North Manchester General Hospital

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North Manchester General Hospital
The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust
Geography
Location Crumpsall, Manchester, England, United Kingdom
Organisation
Care system Public NHS
Hospital type District General
Services
Emergency department Yes Accident & Emergency
Beds 800
History
Founded 1904
Links
Website http://www.pat.nhs.uk/
Lists Hospitals in England

North Manchester General Hospital is a large NHS hospital located in Crumpsall in the north of the English city of Manchester. It is operated as part of the Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust. There is an accident and emergency unit, together with a maternity unit, high dependency unit and a mental health wing.

The hospital has undergone extensive work regarding its size and layout. The main entrance is in the newly built "Phase 1" part of the building, whereas most of the wards are in the old part of the building. A&E is in the new building, along with infectious diseases and tropical medicine.

History[edit]

The extensive hospital site was originally three separate hospitals, namely Crumpsall Hospital, Springfield Hospital and Delaunays Hospital which included specialist mental health services which are new included in the new hospital

The hospital is now the only hospital in the North Manchester area, with Ancoats Hospital, Victoria Memorial Jewish Hospital, Monsall Hospital and Northern Hospital having closed in the latter part of the 20th century. The modern hospital has wings named Monsall Wing, Ancoats Wing and Jewish Victoria Wing, in memory of these former hospitals.

The Victoria Memorial Jewish Hospital was opened in 1904 with 16 beds. By 1928 the number of beds had increased to 62 and at that time a new block containing about 28 beds was being planned. The staff consisted of two resident house surgeons and 12 honorary medical and surgical staff.[1]

The Northern Hospital for Women and Children was founded in 1856 as a dispensary in Stevenson Square, Manchester. In 1867 it moved to a site in the northern suburbs and during the next 70 years expanded progressively until in 1928 it has 22 beds for women patients and 51 cots for children. Further expansion was then planned and Sir Edward Holt, Bart., donated a site at Alms Hill, Cheetham, intended for the construction of a new and larger hospital.[2]

Crumpsall Infirmary had 1,440 beds in 1928 with a further 600 in the attached mental department. The patients included both chronic and acute cases and both acute cases and the work of the obstetric and gynaecological department had been increasing. The hospital had a bacteriological and pathological laboratory and was a registered training school for nurses both in general medical and surgical work and in midwifery.[3]

Hospital radio[edit]

The Cotton Famine Window, North Manchester General Hospital, taken from a convalescent home in Southport

The hospital has its own radio station, Northern Air hospital radio, that has been broadcasting for over 50 years.[when?]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Book of Manchester and Salford..for the..annual meeting of the British Medical Association...1929. Manchester: George Falkner & Sons, 1929; p. 135
  2. ^ The Book of Manchester and Salford..for the..annual meeting of the British Medical Association...1929. Manchester: George Falkner & Sons, 1929; p. 128-29
  3. ^ The Book of Manchester and Salford..for the..annual meeting of the British Medical Association...1929. Manchester: George Falkner & Sons, 1929; p. 138-39

Coordinates: 53°31′N 2°14′W / 53.52°N 2.23°W / 53.52; -2.23