North Texas Conference

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The North Texas Conference is an Annual Conference (a regional episcopal area of the United Methodist Church). This conference encompasses a triangle-shaped northern portion of the state of Texas that spans from Dallas to Wichita Falls to Paris. The conference includes a small geographic area relative to most annual conferences. The North Texas Conference comprises 300 churches, 160,000 members, 4 districts and 20 counties.[1]

Administrative offices are located in Plano, Texas. It is part of the South Central Jurisdictional Conference. On September 1, 2012, Bishop Michael McKee began leading the conference.[2]

North Texas Conference UMC Ministry Center

North Texas Conference Ministry Center

Districts[edit]

The North Texas Annual Conference is further subdivided into four smaller regions, called "districts", which provide further administrative functions for the operation of local churches in cooperation with each other. Each district has a District Superintendent who has a vital role in determining the appointments of clergy to local churches. The districts that are comprised by the North Texas Conference are:[3][4]

  • Metro District. The Metro District comprises most of Dallas County. The 80 churches and fellowships in the Metro District share a mission field that is the most economically, ethnically, and culturally diverse part of the North Texas Conference. Persons living in the Metro District face unique struggles and challenges. Likewise, the churches that comprise the Metro District have unique ways of assessing their needs, reaching new persons, and responding to their neighbors. The Metro District allows the District Superintendent to oversee the pastors and laity of these 80 congregations to dream dreams and implement measurable and creative ways of reaching the neighbors and neighborhoods in the Metro area. Over the next 10 years it is expected that the Metro District will increase in population by 9%. District Superintendent is Reverend Camlle Gaston.[5]
  • East District. The East District is made up of 92 churches on the eastern side of the North Texas Conference. It stretches from Greenville on the West to Mt. Vernon on the East, Bonham to Avery on the north and Aley to Winnsboro on the South. Sixty two pastors serve with over 12,000 professing members to minister the grace of Christ to more than 116,000 households in this broad mission field. Through congregations that are county seat, town and county, family chapels, college campuses, and even a 'cowboy' church the East District is alive and active, making disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. The District Superintendent is Reverend Victor Casad.[7]
  • Northwest District. The Northwest District is comprised of rural, town and country, and county seat congregations in the North Texas Conference. The 66 churches and fellowships in the Northwest District can anticipate 6% population growth over the next decade. Relating, reaching and responding to the lifestyles and mindset of those who live in our rural town and country settings take a different set of skills for the District Superintendent, pastors and churches to connect, grow and send forth disciples who will transform the world for Christ.The District Superintendent is Reverend L. Marvin Guier, III.[8]

Centers[edit]

  • Center for Missional Outreach. The Center for Missional Outreach works to understand and combat the causes of poverty through connectionalism. The Center’s goal is to facilitate this process by promoting best practices and helping churches that need a little extra assistance and mentoring. The Center’s belief is that ministry with the poor begins by listening to and learning from those affected by poverty, those with firsthand knowledge of circumstances and potential solutions. The Center Director is Reverend Dr. Larry George.[10]
  • Center for Connectional Resources. The Center for Connectional Resources provides administrative services for the churches of The North Texas Conference. These services include the central treasury, pensions, health insurance, property and liability insurance, and others. The Center Director is Reverend Jodi Smith.[12]

Institutions (owned by or with a strong relationship with the North Texas Conference)[edit]

Statistics[edit]

  • 2013 Membership: 160,000
  • 2013 Number of Churches in Conference: 300
  • 2013 Number of Counties: 20[13]

2016 General Conference and Jurisdictional Conference Delegates[edit]

The following delegates were elected at the 2014 North Texas Annual Conference held in June 2014 for the 2016 General Conference on May 10–20, 2016, in Portland, Oregon,[14] and the 2016 South Central Jurisdictional Conference on July 13–16, 2016, in Wichita, Kansas.[15]

Clergy Delegates to General Conference[16]

Lay Delegates to General Conference[17]

Clergy Delegates to Jurisdictional Conference[18]

Lay Delegates to Jurisdictional Conference[19]

Alternates[20]

Clergy:

Lay:

Key Conference Leaders[edit]

Bishop Michael McKee

Bishop Michael McKee

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "North Texas UMC". North Texas UMC. North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "Office of the Bishop". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2008-04-23. 
  3. ^ "Districts". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2011-06-03. 
  4. ^ "Strategic Plan". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2011-06-03. 
  5. ^ "Metro District". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  6. ^ "North Central District". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  7. ^ "East District". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  8. ^ "Northwest District". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  9. ^ "Center for Leadership Development". Center for Leadership Development of The North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  10. ^ "Center for Missional Outreach". Center for Missional Outreach of The North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  11. ^ "Center for New Church Development and Congregational Transformation". Center for New Church Development and Congregational Transformation of The North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  12. ^ "Center for Connectional Resources". Center for Connectional Resources of The North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  13. ^ "North Texas Conference News Page". North Texas Conference of the UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  14. ^ "General Conference of the UMC 2016". United Methodist Church. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  15. ^ "2016 South Central Jurisdictional Conference". South Central Jurisdiction of the UMC 2016. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  16. ^ "2016 North Texas Conference Delegates". North Texas Conference of UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  17. ^ "2016 North Texas Conference Delegates". North Texas Conference of UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  18. ^ "2016 North Texas Conference Delegates". North Texas Conference of UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  19. ^ "2016 North Texas Conference Delegates". North Texas Conference of UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  20. ^ "2016 North Texas Conference Delegates". North Texas Conference of UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  21. ^ "Office of the Bishop of the North Texas Conference of the UMC". North Texas Conference UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  22. ^ "Cabinet of the North Texas Conference of the UMC". North Texas Conference UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 
  23. ^ "Lay Leader of The North Texas Conference of the UMC". North Texas Conference UMC. Retrieved 2014-06-13. 

External links[edit]