Northfield Manor House

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Northfield Manor House
NorthfieldManorHouse.jpg
General information
Town or city Birmingham
Country England
Coordinates 52°25′42″N 1°57′34″W / 52.42827°N 1.959311°W / 52.42827; -1.959311Coordinates: 52°25′42″N 1°57′34″W / 52.42827°N 1.959311°W / 52.42827; -1.959311
Owner Banner Homes

Northfield Manor House is a Manor House, on Bristol Road South, Northfield, Birmingham, England. It was formerly known as Manor Farm, and under that name was home to George and Elizabeth Cadbury.

On 30 July 2014, the building suffered extensive damage caused by a severe fire, confirmed as arson.

History[edit]

The property had belonged to the University of Birmingham since 1953, when it was bought from the Cadbury family. A farm house, part of the Manor of Northfield, belonging to the Jervoise family, was recorded as being on the site circa 1750.[1] In 1809 the estate was purchased by Daniel Ledsam, a London merchant.[1] It is believed that he made alterations to the house and was responsible for the current main building.[1]

George Cadbury bought the house in 1890[1] and the Cadburys moved there from Woodbrooke, in Selly Oak, Birmingham, in 1894. They lived there together until George's death at the house in 1922. Elizabeth continued to reside there until her own death in 1951, aged 93. During the Second World War she invited the Friends' Ambulance Unit to use the grounds as a training centre.

On acquisition by the University, the property was renamed The Manor House and converted for use from 1958 as a hall of residence by H W Hobbiss. Additional wings have since been added. Its use as a hall of residence ceased in 2007, apparently because of prohibitive costs of bringing the property up to current health and safety standards.[citation needed]

Architecturally, it is in Tudor-style stone and brick, with timber-framing, projecting porch and carved bay windows probably by George Gadd who also designed some of the early Cadbury's factory buildings at Bournville. Internally the style is Jacobean with wood panelling, carving and inscriptions.

It is a grade A locally listed building and has been considered for national listing; however English Heritage declined to list it.[1]

2014 fire[edit]

On 30 July 2014, the building suffered extensive damage caused by a severe fire. There were plans to sell the building to Banner Homes for redevelopment [2] if the planning application for conversion to apartments before the city council were successful.[3] A West Midlands Fire Service spokesman said up to 100 firefighters had tackled the blaze.[4] Twenty fire engines, including specialist hydraulic platforms and a high-volume water pump, were deployed.[4] Firefighters said the cause was arson; the second such attack on the building in two days.[4] Much of the main grade A listed building was damaged or destroyed.[2] Three boys, aged 12, 14 and 15, were subsequently arrested and later bailed, on suspicion of starting the fire.[5]

Northfield Manor Farm Park[edit]

Manor Farm Park

Manor Farm Park was once the grounds of Northfield Manor House. It comprises a 50-acre open space with woodlands, meadows and a lake, created by damming Griffins Brook. Merritt's Brook also crosses the park.

There is a wooden picnic barn built for visiting schoolchildren in 1894.

The park opened to the public in 1951.

References[edit]

External links[edit]