Northgate, Seattle

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Northgate
Seattle Neighborhood
The skyline of central Northgate from North Seattle College
The skyline of central Northgate from North Seattle College
General area of Northgate (inexact)
General area of Northgate (inexact)

Northgate is an informal district of neighborhoods in north urban Seattle, Washington named for and surrounding Northgate Mall, the first covered mall in the United States.[1] Its east-west principal arterials are NE Northgate Way and 130th Street, and its north-south principal arterials are Roosevelt Way NE and Aurora Avenue N (SR 99). Minor arterials are College Way-Meridian Avenue N, 1st, 5th, and 15th avenues NE.[2] Interstate 5 runs through the district. Besides the eponymous mall, the most characteristic distinctions of the area are North Seattle Community College (NSCC), the south fork of the Thornton Creek watershed, and the Sheikh Abdul Kadir Idriss Mosque, also known as "Sheikh Idriss Mosque" or "Islamic Idriss Mosque".

History[edit]

Prehistory[edit]

What is now Northgate has been inhabited since the end of the last glacial period (c. 8,000 BCE—10,000 years ago). The Dkhw’Duw’Absh, People of the Inside and Xacuabš, People of the Large Lake, Lushootseed (Skagit-Nisqually) Coast Salish native people had used the Liq'tid Springs area as a spiritual health spa. They harvested cranberries from the Slo’q `qed (SLOQ-qed, bald head), an 85 acre (34 ha) marsh and bog at what is now the NSCC car park, Interstate 5 interchange, and Northgate Mall. Large open areas for game habitat and foraging (anthropogenic grasslands) were maintained in what are now these neighborhoods by selective burning every few years. Today the Native American descendants are represented by the Duwamish tribe.

Development[edit]

The Northgate area has been subject to a large amount of residential and commercial development in the last few years, and many huge projects are underway. The height limits in the area have been increased to 85' to allow for further population growth.

In 2009 the Northgate Mall was remodeled and added dozens more retail shops. In 2006, a new park, library, and community center opened in the Northgate neighborhood across 5th Ave NE from Northgate Mall. These are part of the city's plan to accelerate development in Northgate.[citation needed]

While there is much commerce in the area, hotel development has been limited with only the Hotel Nexus,[3] previously a Ramada Inn, being the only upscale hotel in the area. The many motels lining Aurora Avenue are further northwest than the Northgate neighborhood.

Neighborhoods[edit]

Northgate, from the Seattle City Clerk's Office Neighborhood Atlas

Northgate neighborhoods are (north to south):[4][5][6]

Mosque[edit]

The Sheihk Idriss Mosque in Pinehurst has architecture unique in Seattle. An octagonal dome and a symbolic minaret, both sheathed in copper and capped with crescent moons, red brick walls banded with buff brick and tall glass-block windows topped with concrete lintels in the shape of Moorish arches distinguish the first mosque in Seattle (1981) and the first mosque west of the Mississippi River to be built in a Middle Eastern design.[7]

Mall[edit]

The north entrance of the Northgate Mall before removal of the totem pole

The Northgate Mall, opened in 1950, is the first regional shopping center called a mall, though there are 3 other shopping centers in the United States which predate it.[1] At the time of its opening, it was located outside of the Seattle city limits, though this is no longer the case. It is located in the Maple Leaf neighborhood of Northgate.[8]

Surrounding Northgate Mall are many strip malls and the "Northgate North" shopping center which features a Best Buy and a two-story Target.

Further reading[edit]

  • "About the Seattle City Clerk's On-line Information Services". Information Services. Seattle City Clerk's Office. 2006-04-30. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
    See heading, "Note about limitations of these data".
  • Bowditch, Elise; Wang, Man; Wilson, Matthew (2002-01-30). "North Seattle Community College Trail Siting". GEOG461 Urban GIS, Department of Geography. University of Washington. Archived from the original on 2006-09-17. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Elise Bowditch, Teaching Assistant; Man Wang, Teaching Assistant; Matthew W. Wilson, Research Associate.
  • Dailey, Tom. "Duwamish-Seattle". Coast Salish Villages of Puget Sound. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Page links to Village Descriptions Duwamish-Seattle section.
    Dailey referenced "Puget Sound Geography" by T. T. Waterman. Washington DC: National Anthropological Archives, mss. [n.d.] [ref. 2];
    Duwamish et al. vs. United States of America, F-275. Washington DC: US Court of Claims, 1927. [ref. 5];
    "Indian Lake Washington" by David Buerge in the Seattle Weekly, 1–7 August 1984 [ref. 8];
    "Seattle Before Seattle" by David Buerge in the Seattle Weekly, 17–23 December 1980. [ref. 9];
    The Puyallup-Nisqually by Marian W. Smith. New York: Columbia University Press, 1940. [ref. 10].
    Recommended start is "Coast Salish Villages of Puget Sound".
  • Dolan, Maria; True, Kathryn (2003). "North Seattle Community College Wetlands". Nature in the city: Seattle. Seattle: Mountaineers Books. pp. 242–7. ISBN 0-89886-879-3. 
  • Hodson, Jeff (2000-02-16). "Restoration urged for Thornton Creek : Local News". The Seattle Times. Retrieved 2006-04-21. [9]
  • Lakw'alas (2004-07-22). Thomas R. Speer, ed. "Chief Si'ahl" (DOC). Duwamish Tribe. Archived from the original on 2006-06-23. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Includes bibliography.
  • "Map of Licton Springs-North College Park". "Welcome to the Licton Springs Neighborhood". Licton Springs Community Council. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
    Map of Licton Springs-North College Park.
  • "Licton Springs Neighborhood: Local Interest". Licton Springs Community Council. 2000. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • "Northgate". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Office of the Seattle City Clerk. 2002-06-17. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • Shenk, Carol; Pollack, Laurie; Dornfeld, Ernie; Frantilla, Anne; Neman, Chris (2002-06-26, maps .jpg c. 2002-06-15). "About neighborhood maps". Seattle City Clerk's Office Neighborhood Map Atlas. Information Services, Seattle City Clerk's Office. Retrieved 2006-04-21.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
    Sources for this atlas and the neighborhood names used in it include a 1980 neighborhood map produced by the Department of Community Development (relocated to the Department of Neighborhoods and other agencies), Seattle Public Library indexes, a 1984-1986 Neighborhood Profiles feature series in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, numerous parks, land use and transportation planning studies, and records in the Seattle Municipal Archives.
    [Maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] dated 13 June 2002; "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg dated 17 June 2002.]
  • "Restoration Activities: A Few of Our Accomplishments". Thornton Creek Alliance, Seattle Community Network. Retrieved 2006-04-21.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  • Walter, Sunny; local Audubon chapters (2006-02-10). "Sunny Walter's Washington Nature Weekends: Wildlife Viewing Locations - Greater Seattle Area". Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    "with additions by Sunny Walter and local Audubon chapters."
    Viewing locations only; the book has walks, hikes, wildlife, and natural wonders.
    Walter excerpted from
    • Dolan, Maria; True, Kathryn (2003). Nature in the city: Seattle. Seattle: Mountaineers Books. ISBN 0-89886-879-3. 
      "with additions by Sunny Walter and local Audubon chapters." See "Northeast Seattle" section, bullet points "Meadowbrook", "Paramount Park Open Space", "North Seattle Community College Wetlands", and "Sunny Walter -- Twin Ponds".

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wilma, David (2001-08-02, corrected 2005-02-16, updated on 2005-05-07). "Northgate Shopping Mall opens on April 21, 1950.". HistoryLink.org Essay 3186. Retrieved 2007-05-17.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
    Wilma referenced Walt Crowley with Paul Dorpat (Photography Editor), National Trust Guide: Seattle (New York: John Wiley & Son, Inc., 1998), 209;
    HistoryLink.org Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History, "Northgate Beginnings" (by Jim Douglas), accessed August 2001;
    L. B. Fussell, "Section To Be Known As 'Northgate'", The Seattle Times, February 22, 1948;
    "Features Of Northgate Shopping Area Outlined", Ibid., February 1, 1950; "Polar Bear Cubs And $35,000 Car Vie At Northgate", Ibid., May 23, 1950;
    "Plenty of Parking Space At Northgate", Ibid., May 7, 1950;
    "Carter To Carve Totem Pole For Northgate", Ibid., February 26, 1952;
    "Northgate Stores Fete Completion Of 5-acre (20,000 m2) Area", Ibid., February 15, 1952;
    "Car Show Planned On Northgate Mall", Ibid., April 30, 1953;
    "25 New Stores Opening At Northgate", Ibid., August 17, 1965;
    "Did You Know?" Ibid., March 18, 1965;
    "Northgate's Vast Parking Areas Can Accommodate Up To 50,000 Cars A Day", Ibid., March 21, 1968;
    "Eighteen Stores Pioneered Merchandising History At Northgate", Ibid., April 9, 1975;
    "Northgate An Instant Success", Ibid., April 9, 1975;
    "Northgate Center Will Celebrate 30th Anniversary Next Month", Ibid., March 13, 1980;
    simon.com
    Steve Schoenherr (University of San Diego), "Evolution of the Shopping Center", Steve Schoenherr Home Page accessed on November 4, 2004
  2. ^ "Street Classification Maps". Seattle Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    High-Resolution Version, PDF format, 16.1 MB
    Medium-Resolution Version, PDF format, 1.45 MB 12 January 2004.
    Low-Resolution Version, PDF format, 825 KB 12 January 2004.
    "Planned Arterials Map Legend Definitions", PDF format. 12 January 2004.
    The high resolution version is good for printing, 11 x 17. The low and medium resolution versions are good for quicker online viewing. [Source: "Street Classification Maps, Note on Accessing These PDF Files"]
  3. ^ Time : Seattle, WAAmerica/Los_Angeles. "hotelnexusseattle.com". hotelnexusseattle.com. Retrieved 2014-08-03. 
  4. ^ "Seattle City Clerk's Office Geographic Indexing Atlas". Clerk.ci.seattle.wa.us. Retrieved 2014-08-03. 
  5. ^ "Northgate". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Seattle Parks and Recreation. 2002-06-17. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  6. ^ "About the Seattle City Clerk's On-line Information Services". Information Services. Seattle City Clerk's Office. 2006-04-30. Retrieved 2006-05-21. 
    See heading, "Note about limitations of these data".
    Shenk, Pollack, Dornfeld, Frantilla, & Neman.
    Sources for this atlas and the neighborhood names used in it include a 1980 neighborhood map produced by the Department of Community Development (relocated to the Department of Neighborhoods and other agencies, Seattle Public Library indexes, a 1984-1986 Neighborhood Profiles feature series in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, numerous parks, land use and transportation planning studies, and records in the Seattle Municipal Archives "City Archives". Cityofseattle.net. 
    Maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] dated 13 June 2002; "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg dated 17 June 2002
  7. ^ Long, Priscilla (2001-09-15). "Sheihk Idriss Mosque founded in Seattle's Northgate neighborhood in 1981.". HistoryLink.org Essay 3570. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Long referenced David Buerge and Junius Rochester, Roots and Branches (Seattle: Church Council of Greater Seattle, 1988), 221;
    David Schraer, "Northgate's Mosque: A Monument on the Strip", Arcade (Seattle), Vol. 2, No. 2 (June–July 1981), p. 2;
    John Wolcott, "Muslims in the Northwest", The Progress, Vol. 89, No. 3 (January 16, 1986).
  8. ^ Wilma, David (2001-07-20). "Seattle Neighborhoods: Maple Leaf -- Thumbnail History". HistoryLink.org Essay 3454. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
    Wilma referenced Mimi Sheridan and Carol Tobin, Licton Springs History, (Seattle: Licton Springs Community Council, 2001), 8;
    Don Sherwood, "Sacajawea P.F.", in "Interpretive Essays of the Histories of Seattle's Parks and Playfields", handwritten bound manuscript dated 1977, Seattle Room, Seattle Public Library.
  9. ^ "Living | Stream Salvation | Seattle Times Newspaper". Archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com. 2000-04-16. Retrieved 2014-08-03. 

Coordinates: 47°42′30″N 122°19′42″W / 47.70833°N 122.32833°W / 47.70833; -122.32833