Northome, Minnesota

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Northome, Minnesota
City
Nickname(s): Big Bear Capitol
Location of the city of Northomewithin Koochiching County, Minnesota
Location of the city of Northome
within Koochiching County, Minnesota
Coordinates: 47°52′23″N 94°16′44″W / 47.87306°N 94.27889°W / 47.87306; -94.27889Coordinates: 47°52′23″N 94°16′44″W / 47.87306°N 94.27889°W / 47.87306; -94.27889
Country United States
State Minnesota
County Koochiching
Area[1]
 • Total 1.90 sq mi (4.92 km2)
 • Land 1.51 sq mi (3.91 km2)
 • Water 0.39 sq mi (1.01 km2)
Elevation 1,440 ft (439 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 200
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 199
 • Density 132.5/sq mi (51.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 56661
Area code(s) 218
FIPS code 27-47122[4]
GNIS feature ID 0657633[5]
Carved wooden Black Bear Statue at Northome

Northome is a city located in the southwestern corner of Koochiching County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 200 at the 2010 census.[6] The county seat is International Falls, about 70 miles (110 km) away.

U.S. Highway 71 and State Highways 1 and 46 meet in Northome.

Fair[edit]

The Northome Fairgrounds hold the annual Koochiching County Fair, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in August 2006.

Fair events include:

  • Demolition derby or ATV race
  • "Scenic Sinkhole Scramble" (since 1982) - runs of a sanctioned 5k race and a 'fun run' of 2 miles (3.2 km) with a stroller category
  • Animal and crafts judging and a related Bear Fest parade in the city of Northome.
  • The fair grounds also has the "Harold Lowe Memorial Arena", a horse arena capable of hosting barrel racing and other equine activities

History[edit]

Northome was founded in 1903 and enjoyed a boom time early in the 20th century as a logging town.[7]

By the 1930s the big white and red pines were gone and pine trees were essentially locally extirpated due to the unsustainable logging practices of the time,[8] and farming gained importance. Many farmers relocated here from the Dust Bowl conditions in the Dakotas at that time.

The Burlington Northern Railroad had a depot in Northome until the 1980s, although passenger service discontinued in 1960.[9] Today the abandoned railroad bed forms the Blue Ox section of a large network of snowmobile trails.[10]

It could be that the name "Northome" is derived from the Norwegian place name "Norheim" which is found in 4 places in Norway. The name literally means north home.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.90 square miles (4.92 km2), of which 1.51 square miles (3.91 km2) is land and 0.39 square miles (1.01 km2) is water.[1]

Northome is located at 47°52′19″N 94°16′48″W / 47.87194°N 94.28000°W / 47.87194; -94.28000 (47.871986, -94.280248).

There are named former townships around Northome (Bridgie, Englewood, Wildwood, etc.) but in Koochiching County all townships are unorganized. Therefore, for Census and other government purposes, the city of Northome also lends its name to the surrounding Unorganized Territory of Northome (approximately 300 square miles (800 km2) of SW Koochiching County, excluding Northome and Mizpah, with 500 people in the 2000 census).

Economy[edit]

Important sources of employment in the area include the Northome School, health care/assisted living facilities, and independent resorts, logging and farming. The local newspaper was the Northome Record, produced from 1905-2007. Shortly after the Northome Record ceased the Northome Area News was created by a local family.

The nearest stop light is 40 miles away in Bemidji, the regional shopping hub.

Wildlife[edit]

The town is on the shores of Bartlett Lake; to the south is Island Lake, popular for fishing and swimming. The lake holds Northern Pike, crappie, perch, and Bull Head. Other smaller lakes are in the area as well, together supporting a variety of fish including walleye and northern pike. Unlike most of the rest of the Lower 48 states, timber wolves (the grey wolf) were never eradicated from this area,[11] and wolves can still be heard at night, though rarely seen. Bald Eagles and black bears are commonly sighted. There have also been occasional reports of cougar sightings. This area is in the southern part of the Taiga, or boreal forest.

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 200 people, 89 households, and 53 families residing in the city. The population density was 132.5 inhabitants per square mile (51.2 /km2). There were 104 housing units at an average density of 68.9 per square mile (26.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.0% White, 1.0% Native American, and 2.0% from two or more races.

There were 89 households of which 23.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.9% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.4% were non-families. 34.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 18% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.83.

The median age in the city was 49.7 years. 22% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 16% were from 25 to 44; 32% were from 45 to 64; and 23.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

Primary occupations in the area are logging timber, farming, healthcare and resorts/tourism. The largest single employer is the Northome School. As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 230 people, 87 households, and 46 families residing in the city. The population density was 151.3 people per square mile (58.4/km²). There were 113 housing units at an average density of 74.4 per square mile (28.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.96% White, 1.74% Native American, and 1.30% from two or more races.

There were 87 households out of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 2.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.1% were non-families. 42.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 32.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.6% under the age of 18, 3.9% from 18 to 24, 19.6% from 25 to 44, 23.5% from 45 to 64, and 30.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 71.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 61.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,417, and the median income for a family was $36,250. Males had a median income of $30,556 versus $20,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,758. About 13.0% of families and 24.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.0% of those under the age of eighteen and 20.8% of those sixty five or over.

Outdoor activities[edit]

Fall brings the deer hunters and in the winter snowmobiling is a growing activity, supporting a small industry with a network of trails leading to nearby communities, including across the Big Bog State Recreation Area to Waskish Township. Winters also support ice-fishing, as cold temperatures occasionally dipping down to −40° (F or C) create ice that can support small snowplows to clear roads on the lakes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census. Retrieved 23 April 2011. 
  7. ^ "Northome History". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  8. ^ "Short Supply—1900". Retrieved 2011-03-11. 
  9. ^ "M&I Railroad History". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Blue Ox Rail to Trail". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "Wolf Range 1978-1998". 

External links[edit]