Northwestern University Dance Marathon

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Northwestern University
Dance Marathon
Abbreviation NUDM
Formation 1975
Purpose Philanthropy
Location Evanston, IL
Executive Co-Chairs

David Ryan

Ander Aretakis
Volunteers 1,500
Website http://nudm.org/

The Northwestern University Dance Marathon, commonly known as NUDM, is a philanthropic dance marathon held every March at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Currently in its 40th year, NUDM is one of the nation’s largest entirely student-run philanthropies. Last year, NUDM raised $1,214,632 for The Danny Did Foundation, a Chicago-based organization that raises epilepsy awareness and combats sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.[1] In 2011, it was named The Most Influential College Organization at the 2011 Stay Classy Awards.[2][3] For its 40th year, NUDM supported Team Joseph, which funds research to find a treatment or cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy . The Evanston Community Foundation is NUDM’s secondary beneficiary. The event raised a record $1,385,273 during the weekend of March 7–9, 2014.

History[edit]

Forty years ago, Dance Marathon, the philanthropic child of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity and the Associated Student Government, was born on the Northwestern University campus.

The Dance Marathon was inspired by NU's participation in the University of Illinois dance marathon in 1974. After representing NU at UI, Jan Jacobowitz approached Tim Rivelli, Associated Student Government Vice President, with the idea of starting a dance marathon at Northwestern. Tim and Jan met with representatives of the American Epilepsy Foundation and the Dance Marathon was born. Tim's fraternity, ATO, took charge of the operation and ran the dance marathon.

Twenty-one couples danced for NUDM in 1975. It was called the "Dance to Give Them a Chance" marathon then, and it benefited the American Epilepsy Foundation and the National Association for Retarded Citizens. Fifteen couples made it through the fifty-two hour marathon, raising $9,105 at Blomquist Memorial Gymnasium. The winning couple, Donna Miller and Tony Krileff, was sponsored by Bobb Hall and a local liquor store.[4]

NUDM 1976 saw a new venue as the dancing was moved to Patten Gym and the dancing time was lessened to twenty-six hours. When the sponsor decided to discontinue the event after two years, Triangle Fraternity picked up the mantle and looked for a venue where other fund-raising events were possible. In 1977, NUDM found its current home: the Norris University Center, where students have been dancing for thirty hours at a time ever since. To institutionalize the event for the long haul and ensure a continuing flow of good ideas from students, organizers turned it into a campus-wide charitable event.[5]

Special events to raise extra money for the cause were added over the years, like the NUDM Spa, where manicures and haircuts are given in Norris during the weekend of NUDM. Other events take place to keep the rest of the campus involved while the dancers are busy, such as a DDR tournament and performances by on-campus groups.

Chicago's The Second City comedy troupe paid a visit in 1984. Since that time, popular bands and performers have been a highlight of the weekend of. NUDM has attracted the attention of celebrities such Barack Obama, George and Barbara Bush, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Adam Sandler, the cast of Modern Family,[6] and NU alumni David Schwimmer, Seth Meyers, and Mike Greenberg. Chicago celebrities, like former mayor Jane Byrne and Chicago Bears players Mike Tomczak, Keith Van Horne and Trace Armstrong, have also danced.[7]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Northwestern University Dance Marathon Raises Over $1 Million For Charity (PHOTOS)". The Huffington Post (TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc.). 2012-03-05. 
  2. ^ "The 10 Biggest College Fundraisers". thebestcolleges (The Best Colleges). 2012-12-20. 
  3. ^ "Northwestern University Dance Marathon Raises Over $1 Million For Charity (PHOTOS)". The Huffington Post (TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc.). 2012-03-05. 
  4. ^ NUDM. "About". http://nudm.org/about/
  5. ^ NUDM. "About". http://nudm.org/about/
  6. ^ https://vimeo.com/61693936
  7. ^ NUDM. "About". http://nudm.org/about/

External links[edit]