Norwegian Sami Association

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NSR Members of the Sami parliament 2005–2009.

The Norwegian Sami Association (Northern Sami: Norgga Sámiid Riikasearvi, Norwegian: Norske Samers Riksforbund), also known as NSR, is the largest Sámi organization in Norway. The association was founded in 1968.[1]

Purpose[edit]

The NSR actively runs cultural, social, and informational work through local groups and Sami associations. In total 24 Sami associations are attached to the NSR. The NSR is also active politically, running for elections in Sametinget (the Sami Parliament of Norway) and sending delegates to the Saami Council.

The NSR was founded in 1968, so it has been contributing to the development of Sami society and culture since before the Sami Parliament was established. The NSR goal is to unite the Sami people across different special interests. As such, the NSR is independent of any outside political parties or religions.

Since the establishment of the Sami Parliament in 1989, the NSR has held the leadership and presidency of the organization. The Sami Parliament presidents have been Ole Henrik Magga from Kautokeino (1989–1997), Sven-Roald Nystø from Tysfjord (1997–2005), and Aili Keskitalo from Kautokeino (2005–2007 and 2013–present).

Presidents[edit]

The following table lists the presidents of the NSR since its founding.[2]

Name Term
Martin Urheim (acting) 2013–present
Aili Keskitalo 2008–2013
Silje Karine Muotka 2006–2008
Martin Urheim (acting) 2005–2006
Aili Keskitalo 2003–2005
Klemet Erland Hætta 2001–2003
Janoš Trosten 1998–2001
Geir Tommy Pedersen (acting) 1997–1998
Sven-Roald Nystø 1995–1997
Nils Thomas Utsi 1991–1995
Ragnhild Lydia Nystad 1985–1991
Ole Henrik Magga 1980–1985
Odd Ivar Solbakk 1979–1980
Peder Andersen 1976–1979
Odd Mathis Hætta 1974–1976
Regnor Solbakk 1971–1974
Johan Mathis Klemetsen 1969–1971

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Om oss" [About us] (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2011-03-07. 
  2. ^ "NSRs ledere gjennom 30 år" [NSRs leaders through 30 years] (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2011-03-07. 

External links[edit]


This article incorporates information from the revision as of 8-11-2007 of the equivalent article on the Norwegian (bokmål) Wikipedia.