Norwegian continued prohibition referendum, 1926

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A consultative and facultative referendum on continuing with prohibition was held in Norway on 18 October 1926.[1] Partial prohibition had been effective since 1917, and following a 1919 referendum, spirits and dessert wine had also been banned.

Partially caused by pressure from France, who saw their export of alcoholic beverages drop, a referendum was organised to decide whether prohibition should be continued. Popular support for prohibition fell in all counties. It was overwhelmingly rejected in and around Oslo, as well as in other urban areas like Bergen. As a result, the law was abolished and prohibition brought to an end.

Results[edit]

Choice Votes %
For 423,031 44.3
Against 531,084 55.7
Invalid/blank votes 6,467
Total 960,582 100
Registered voters/turnout 1,482,724 64.8
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

By county[edit]

County Continue
prohibition
votes (%)
County Continue
prohibition
votes (%)
Østfold 42.8 Akershus 17.1
Oslo 13.0 Hedmark 24.0
Oppland 39.9 Buskerud 26.4
Vestfold 28.3 Telemark 53.4
Aust-Agder 66.0 Vest-Agder 69.0
Rogaland 73.1 Hordaland 70.9
Bergen 32.8 Sogn og Fjordane 71.3
Møre og Romsdal 77.2 Sør-Trøndelag 48.1
Nord-Trøndelag 59.0 Nordland 50.6
Troms 56.7 Finnmark 52.0

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1438 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7

External links[edit]