Norwegian parliamentary election, 1961

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Norwegian parliamentary election, 1961
Norway
1957 ←
1961
→ 1965

All 150 seats in the Norwegian Parliament
76 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Einar Gerhardsen 1945.jpeg Alv Kjøs.PNG PMPer Borten.jpg
Leader Einar Gerhardsen Alv Kjøs Per Borten
Party Labour Conservative Centre
Last election 78 seats, 48.3% 29 seats, 21.7% 15 seats, 9.9%
Seats won 74 29 16
Seat change Decrease4 Steady0 Increase1
Popular vote 860,526 37,3778[b] 201,465[a]
Percentage 46.8% 20.4%[b] 10.9%[a]

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Bent Røiseland.png
Leader Einar Hareide Bent Røiseland Knut Løfsnes
Party Christian Democratic Liberal Socialist People's
Last election 12 seats, 10.2% 15 seats, 10.5% New
Seats won 15 14 2
Seat change Increase3 Decrease1 Increase2
Popular vote 190,860[b] 208,251[a] 43,996
Percentage 10.4%[b] 11.3%[a] 2.4%

Prime Minister before election

Einar Gerhardsen
Labour

Prime Minister-designate

Einar Gerhardsen
Labour

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 11 September 1961.[1] The result was a victory for the Labour Party, which won 74 of the 150 seats in the Storting. Although it lost its absolute majority, the Labour Party was able to continue in government.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Labour Party 860,526 46.8 74 –4
Conservative Party 354,369 19.3 29 0
Christian People's Party 171,451 9.3 15 +3
Liberal Party 132,429 7.2 14 –1
Centre Party 125,643 6.8 16 +1
Centrists-Liberals 75,822 4.1 [a]
Communist Party 53,678 2.9 0 –1
Socialist People's Party 43,996 2.4 2 New
Christians-Conservatives 19,409 1.1 [b]
Free Left Electorate's List 2,360 0.1 0 New
Norwegian Social Democratic Party 478 0.0 0 0
Wild votes 64 0.0
Invalid/blank votes 10,323
Total 1,850,548 100 150 0
Registered voters/turnout 2,340,495 79.1
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

a The joint list of the Centre Party and the Liberal Party won eight seats, three taken by the Liberal Party and five by the Centre Party.[2]

b The joint list of the Conservative Party and the Christian People's Party won two seats, with the parties taking one each.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1438 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ a b Nohlen & Stöver, p1459