Nosology

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Nosology (from Ancient Greek νόσος (nosos), meaning "disease", and -λογία (-logia), meaning "study of-") is a branch of medicine that deals with classification of diseases.

Types of classification[edit]

Diseases may be classified by etiology (cause), pathogenesis (mechanism by which the disease is caused), or by symptom(s). Alternatively, diseases may be classified according to the organ system involved, though this is often complicated since many diseases affect more than one organ.

A chief difficulty in nosology is that diseases often cannot be defined and classified clearly, especially when etiology or pathogenesis are unknown. Thus diagnostic terms often only reflect a symptom or set of symptoms (syndrome).

Disease is not a fixed entity but an ever changing process like that of life itself. Disease is an abstraction made by our mental concept;the factual reality is the diseased person. Must read Classification of disease by Dr. Samuel Hahnemann (Father of Homeopathy)

History[edit]

The Ayurveda is a collection of early Indian works about medicine. In China the Huangdi Neijing is another ancient text. In the West, Hippocrates was one of the earliest writers on the subject of disease. The book of Leviticus also includes an early discussion of the treatment of skin diseases. See Metzora (parsha) In the 10th century the Arabian psychologist Najab ud-din Unhammad classified a nosology of nine major categories of mental disorders, which included 30 different mental illnesses in total. Some of the categories he described included obsessive-compulsive disorders, delusional disorders, degenerative diseases, involutional melancholia, and states of abnormal excitement.[1][verification needed]

In the 18th century, the taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus, Francois Boissier de Sauvages, and psychiatrist Philippe Pinel developed an early classification of physical illnesses. Thomas Sydenham's work in the late 17th century might also be considered a nosology. In the 19th century, Emil Kraepelin and then Jacques Bertillon developed their own nosologies. Bertillon's work, classifying causes of death, was a precursor of the modern code system, the International Classification of Diseases.

The early nosological efforts grouped diseases by their symptoms, whereas modern systems (e.g. SNOMED) focus on grouping diseases by the anatomy and etiology involved.

Applications[edit]

  • Nosology is used extensively in public health, to allow epidemiological studies of public health issues. Analysis of death certificates requires nosological coding of causes of death.
  • Nosological classifications are used in medical administration, such as filing of health insurance claims, and patient records, among others

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Millon, Theodore (2004), Masters of the Mind: Exploring the Story of Mental Illness from Ancient Times to the New Millennium, John Wiley & Sons, p. 38, ISBN 978-0-471-46985-8 

External links[edit]

  • Gordon L. Snider, Nosology for Our Day Its Application to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Vol 167. pp. 678–683, (2003). fulltext
  • C. S. Herrman, The Bipolar Spectrum, SSRN (Social Science Research Network, 5 August 2010) [1]
  • Nosology.net: An online resource for nosologic diagnostic systems. This site also demonstrates how the proposed system can be used currently in Neurology and Psychiatry
  • International Classification of Diseases by the World Health Organization. [2]