Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's lacrosse

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Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's lacrosse
NotreDameFightingIrish.svg
Founded 1981 (varsity)
University University of Notre Dame
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Location Notre Dame, Indiana
Coach Kevin Corrigan (since 1988)
Stadium Arlotta Stadium
(capacity: 2,500)
Nickname Fighting Irish
Colors Gold and Blue
         
NCAA Tournament Runner-Up
2010, 2014
NCAA Tournament Final Fours
2001, 2010, 2012, 2014
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
1995, 2000, 2001, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
NCAA Tournament Appearances
(19) - 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Conference Tournament Champions
2008 (GWLL), 2009 (GWLL), 2014 (ACC)
Conference Regular Season Champions
1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2015

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's lacrosse team represents the University of Notre Dame in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's college lacrosse. Notre Dame competes as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference and plays its home games at Arlotta Stadium, or occasionally the indoor Loftus Sports Center, in Notre Dame, Indiana.

History[edit]

Notre Dame men's lacrosse was a club sport until it became a varsity program in the 1981 season. Current Notre Dame Athletic Director Jack Swarbrick was a midfielder on Notre Dame's club lacrosse team during his undergraduate years (1972-'76)[1] before the team acquired varsity status. From 1981 to 1993, Notre Dame competed in the Midwest Lacrosse Association. From 1994 to 2009, it was then a member of the Great Western Lacrosse League. In 2010, it became a member of the newly established Big East men's lacrosse conference.[2] In 2012, Notre Dame announced that it would be joining the Atlantic Coast Conference.[3] From 1981 to 1988, the program was led by head coach Rich O'Leary, who established a career record of 64-42 (.604),[4] after which Kevin Corrigan took over as head coach, beginning in 1989. Within ten years as a varsity program, the Fighting Irish made its first appearance in the NCAA championship tournament in 1990, and since then has regularly appeared there. In 2001, the fifth-seeded Irish reached the semi-final round (Final Four) for the first time after defeating Bucknell 12-7 and fourth-seeded Johns Hopkins 13-9 in earlier rounds, and finished the season with a 14-2 record and a #4 ranking in the nation.

More recently, Notre Dame has made the NCAA championship tournament every year since 2006. In 2009, the Irish went undefeated in the regular season, reaching #2 in national polls, and finished with an overall record of 15-1, with five players receiving All-America honors. In the fall of 2009, Notre Dame opened its new lacrosse-specific outdoor stadium, Arlotta Stadium, with 2,500 seats, an artificial turf field, locker rooms, restrooms, and concession areas.[5] In 2010, the Irish began play in the new Big East men's lacrosse conference and went 7-6 in the regular season before advancing to the NCAA tournament as an unseeded selection, where it upset higher seeds Princeton, Maryland, and Cornell before being defeated by fifth-seeded Duke, 6-5 in overtime of the championship game. In 2011, Notre Dame went 10-2 in the regular season, reaching #1 in national polls,[6] and advanced to the quarterfinal round of the NCAA tournament before losing to Duke, 7-5. In 2012, the Irish went 13-3, defeating ranked opponents Duke, Denver, Syracuse, and defending national champion Virginia before losing to the number one seed and eventual national champion Loyola 7-5 in the semi-final round of the NCAA Tournament. In 2013, the Irish finished with an 11-5 record and advanced to the quarterfinal round of the tournament, losing to eventual champion Duke, 12-11.

In the history of the program, Notre Dame has produced numerous All-Americans: Mike Iorio (1993, 1994, 1995); Randy Colley (1994, 1995); Todd Rassas (1996, 1997, 1998); Alex Cade (1996); Jimmy Keenan (1996, 1997, 1998); Chris Dusseau (1999); Tom Glatzel (2000, 2001); David Ulrich (2000, 2001); Kirk Howell (2001); Steve Bishko (2001); Mike Adams (2001); AJ Wright (2002); Pat Walsh (2003, 2004, 2005); DJ Driscoll (2005, 2006); Joey Kemp (2006, 2007, 2008); Brian Hubschmann (2007); Sean Dougherty (2007, 2008); Michael Podgajny (2007, 2008); Will Yeatman (2007); Ryan Hoff (2008, 2009); Regis McDermott (2009); Sam Barnes (2009); Grant Krebs (2009, 2010); Scott Rodgers (2009, 2010); Zach Brenneman (2010, 2011); David Earl (2010, 2011); Kevin Ridgway (2010, 2011); Sam Barnes (2011), Andrew Irving (2011), John Kemp (2011, 2012, 2013), Kevin Randall (2012), Jim Marlatt (2012, 2013), Matt Miller (2012, 2013), and Matt Kavanagh (2013, 2014).

In addition, several Notre Dame players have been Tewaaraton Trophy nominees: Tom Glatzel (2001), David Ulrich (2001), Pat Walsh (2004, 2005), Joey Kemp (2008), Scott Rodgers (2009, 2010), Grant Krebs (2010), David Earl (2011), Kevin Ridgway (2011), and John Kemp (2012, 2013).

Under current coach Kevin Corrigan, the Irish have an overall record of 241-114 (.679) through the 2013 season.[7] The program has a 100% graduation rate since it was started in 1981.[8] Corrigan has been selected as the GWLL Coach of the Year fives times, including in 2009, which was the conference's final season before the establishment of the Big East men's lacrosse conference.

At the beginning of its games, the Irish team is traditionally led onto the playing field by a teammate playing the bagpipes, a tradition that was begun during the 1996 season by then-freshman Sean Meehan and has since been passed down to other players including Chad DeBolt, Daniel Hickey, Regis McDermott, Colt Power, Ryan Mix, and Edwin Glazener.

Annual Record Men's Lacrosse[edit]

Year Wins Losses Percent Conference Playoffs National Rank RPI SOS Power Rating (1)
2014 12 6 .667 4th NCAA Finals (2) 5 3 1 4
2013 11 5 .690 3rd NCAA Quarterfinals (3) 7 7 9 15
2012 13 3 .810 1st NCAA Semifinals (4) 5 2 5 8
2011 11 3 .790 2nd NCAA Quarterfinals (5) 5 5 6 6
2010 10 7 .590 4th NCAA Finals (6) 20 10 7 7
2009 15 1 .940 1st NCAA 1st Round (7) 2 7 33 6
2008 14 3 .820 2nd NCAA Quarterfinals (8) 5 5 20 4
2007 11 4 .730 1st NCAA 1st Round (9) 11 12 16 3
(1) Laxpower Power Rating
(2) Won NCAA 1st round 13-5 over Harvard. Won quarterfinal 14-13 over Albany. Won semifinal 11-6 over Maryland. Lost National Championship game to Duke 11-9.
(3) Won NCAA 1st round 9-7 over Detroit Mercy. Lost quarterfinal 12-11 to Duke.
(4) Won NCAA 1st round 13-7 over Yale. Won quarterfinal 12-10 over Virginia. Lost semifinal 7-5 to Loyola.
(5) Won NCAA 1st round 13-6 over Penn. Lost quarterfinal 7-5 to Duke.
(6) Won NCAA 1st round 8-5 over Princeton. Won quarterfinal 7-5 over Maryland. Won semifinal 12-7 over Cornell. Lost National Championship game to Duke 6-5.
(7) Lost NCAA 1st round 7-3 to Maryland.
(8) Won NCAA 1st round 8-7 over Colgate. Lost quarterfinal 11-9 to Syracuse.
(9) Lost NCAA 1st round 11-10 to Johns Hopkins.

External links[edit]

References[edit]