Notre Dame School of Architecture

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Notre Dame School of Architecture
Bond Hall, University of Notre Dame School of Architecture
Bond Hall
Established 1898 (1898)
Type Private
Dean Michael Lykoudis
Academic staff 41
Undergraduates 200 - B.Arch
Postgraduates 30 - M.Arch, M.ADU
Location Notre Dame, Indiana, USA
41°42′4.97″N 86°14′30.11″W / 41.7013806°N 86.2416972°W / 41.7013806; -86.2416972Coordinates: 41°42′4.97″N 86°14′30.11″W / 41.7013806°N 86.2416972°W / 41.7013806; -86.2416972
Website architecture.nd.edu

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture was the first Catholic university in America to offer a degree in architecture, beginning in 1898. The School now runs undergraduate and post-graduate architecture programs.

The School of Architecture has approximately 200 undergraduate students and 30 graduate students. The School has its own library, which includes a rare book collection dedicated to the history of the study and practice of architecture in the United States. The School of Architecture is the smallest of the six major program divisions of the University (the others being the Mendoza College of Business, the College of Arts and Letters, the College of Engineering, the College of Science, and the Law School).

The School of Architecture is located in Bond Hall on the Notre Dame campus. In addition to the library, it holds offices, studios, classrooms, and a small eatery called Café Poche.

The School is known for teaching (pre-modernist) traditional architecture and urban planning (e.g. following the principles of New Urbanism and New Classical Architecture).[1] It also awards the annual Driehaus Architecture Prize for achievements in classical and traditional architecture and sustainable urbanism.

History of the School[edit]

The University of Notre Dame, founded in 1842 by the Congregation of Holy Cross, is an independent, national Catholic university located in Notre Dame, Indiana. Architecture as a discipline was taught at the University as early as 1869, but it was not until 1898 that the faculty was organized into its own School apart from the other Colleges.

Admissions[edit]

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. Any student admitted as an undergraduate to the University of Notre Dame may declare an architecture major. Freshmen are encouraged to enter the five-year program to begin the challenging curriculum as early as possible. Applicants to the architecture graduate program apply directly to the School of Architecture.

Degree programs[edit]

Bachelor of Architecture[edit]

All undergraduate students take a five-year program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) degree.[2] There are typically between 45 and 50 students in each graduating BArch class. Notre Dame's five-year program is as follows:

  • First Year - An introduction to architecture and drawing skills in addition to the university's first-year requirements.
  • Second Year - Permanence, long-term function, accessibility, and aesthetics of buildings are examined from social and environmental viewpoints. Students study Italian in preparation for their third year in Rome, Italy.
  • Third Year - The Rome Studies Program offers students the opportunity to study sustainable architecture and urbanism through the experience of living in Rome.
  • Fourth Year - Principles studied in Rome are applied to American cities with particular emphasis placed on vernacular architecture and supporting regional characteristics.
  • Fifth Year - Students spend the first semester continuing their studies and in a professor-led studio. Second semester is focused on professional practice and other courses; in studio, they complete a thesis project of their choosing.

Master of Architecture[edit]

The School's graduate program offers three programs: a two-year, post-professional degree for students who have already completed an undergraduate or graduate professional degree, leading to a Master of Architectural Design and Urbanism (Path A); a two-year program leading to a Master in Architecture (M.Arch) for students who studied architecture or a related field as undergraduates (Path B); and a three-year program leading to a Master in Architecture (M.Arch) for students who already have degrees in other, unrelated programs (Path C). The latter program for non-majors was started in 2005. In recent years, there have been about 10 graduate students receiving degrees each May, although this number is climbing.[3] All three programs spend a required semester abroad in Rome.

Path A: The 2-year Master of Architectural Design and Urbanism (M.ADU) post-professional degree is intended for students who already hold an accredited professional degree and are seeking to further develop their design skills and critical thinking in the disciplines of classical architecture and traditional urban design.[4]

Path B: Notre Dame's two-year Master of Architecture degree is intended for students entering the University of Notre Dame with a four-year, pre-professional degree with a major in architecture or a related field (i.e. civil engineering, etc.) who are seeking a professional graduate degree that focuses upon classical architecture and traditional urban design. Studio course work is identical to that of Path A (M.ADU), with a foundational first semester spent in South Bend, followed by two semesters of studio work (one in Rome) in the student’s selected concentration, followed by a terminal design project in the student’s fourth semester. Required studio and seminar courses are supplemented by other courses needed to meet the NAAB’s substantive curricular requirements for accredited professional architecture degree programs, which will vary from student to student depending upon their undergraduate architectural education. A minimum of 54 credit-hours are required for graduation, and the normal course load for Path B (two-year, M.Arch) students is 15 credit-hours per semester.

Path C: Path C is a three-year Master of Architecture (M. Arch) professional degree designed for students entering the School with a four-year undergraduate degree in a field other than architecture. Students begin with an intensive three-term foundational sequence of studio, history, theory and technology courses in preparation for the final three terms. The final three-terms are focused on concentration and terminal design projects. Required studio and seminar courses are supplemented by other courses to meet the NAAB standards. Students must earn 90 credit hours (96 max) over six semesters, including a normal load of 18 credit hours for the first three terms, in order to graduate. Advanced standing may be given to students who have completed some portion of their non-studio course work prior to admission, but the six-semester studio sequence is required of all Path C candidates.

Master of Architectural Design and Urbanism[edit]

The School offers a second type of Master's degree. The Master of Architectural Design and Urbanism (M.ADU) is a post-professional degree intended for students who already hold an accredited professional degree and are seeking to further develop their design skills and critical thinking in the disciplines of classical architecture and traditional urban design (Path A). The studio course work consists of a foundational first semester spent in South Bend introducing students to classical architectural design, urban principles and history, and the history of Rome; followed by two semesters of studio work (one in Rome) in the student’s selected concentration, followed by an independent terminal design project in the student’s fourth semester. 42 credit-hours are required for graduation, and M.ADU students are limited to 12 credit-hours maximum in any semester (except in Rome). M.ADU students also serve as Teaching Assistants in undergraduate courses in their three semesters in South Bend, for which they receive a stipend.

Rome Studies Program[edit]

The Rome Studies Program was founded in 1969 as a required third-year study abroad program by Francesco "Frank" Montana, Department Chair from 1950 to 1972.

The program consists of four courses per semester including design studio, hand drawing and watercolor, architectural theory, and architectural history. The curriculum focuses on classical architecture and the design of contemporary buildings in a classical manner following the precedents of Vitruvius, Palladio and Vignola.

Throughout the year, students take field trips to various parts of Italy including Umbria and the Marche, Tuscany, the Veneto, the Campania and Sicily. These trips involve visits to historic sites with presentations by faculty members, time for sketching, and free time to explore the cities. Students analyze the country's historical models of buildings and cities to use as resources in creating architecture in the 21st century.[5]

Concentrations[edit]

The School of Architecture offers four concentrations: Furniture Design, Preservation and Restoration, Architectural Practice and Enterprise, and Building Arts. Each concentration includes four to five classes across the fourth and fifth year of study.[6]

Furniture Design[edit]

Since 1992, the School has also offered a concentration in Furniture Design under the direction of Professor Robert Brandt. Students are required to construct furniture of original design while maintaining a high level of craftsmanship. The two-year program consists of four furniture studio classes and one additional class that explores the history of design. The goal of the concentration is to expose architecture students to an ethic in craft, as it trains them to think in three dimensions to resolve design issues of assembly, fit, and finish.

Preservation and Restoration[edit]

Students take courses in the research and documentation of historical buildings which provide a detailed reference to the recording methods and techniques that are fundamental tools for examining an existing structure. The concentration also includes information on recent technological advances such as laser scanning, new case studies, and material on the documentation of historic monuments. Student teams conduct research projects on historic buildings and sites. Special attention is also paid to the history of American architecture.

Under the direction of Professor Krupali Uplekar, past projects have included:
- Analysis and Documentation of Copshaholm, the Oliver Mansion, a historically significant building located in downtown South Bend, Indiana.
- Documentation for the Revitalization of Downtown South Bend, Indiana.
- Analysis and Documentation of St. Paul’s Memorial United Methodist Church, a historic landmark located in downtown South Bend, Indiana.

Architectural Practice and Enterprise[edit]

Up to eight architecture students per year may take courses in accounting, management, statistics, and corporate finance through Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business. The goal of this concentration is to expose architecture students to the workings of the business world for application within the field of architecture.

Architecture and the Building Arts[edit]

The Architecture and the Building Arts concentration focuses on designing and constructing architectural details and architectural models. Under the direction of Professor Kevin Buccellato (AIA, NCARB), it is a four-course sequence designed to develop a keen sense of detail and foundational understanding of methods of assembly. In the first two semesters, students research an historically significant building to produce authoritative drawings and build a detailed model at an appropriate scale. In the third and fourth semesters, the team designs and builds a traditional architectural element at full scale. All courses involve team projects.

Projects completed include:
- Pennsylvania Station Model   Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”, Material - Basswood
- Corner Condition of the Parthenon Study Model   Scale: ¾” = 1’-0”, Material - Poplar - Corner Condition of the Parthenon Scale Model   Scale: 3” = 1’-0”, Material - Poplar (Completed model stands 16ft tall in the foyer of Bond Hall)

Projects currently under construction include:
- Grant Park (Soldier Field) Model   Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”, Material - Basswood
- Traditional Wood-framed Wall Section w/ Double-Hung Window   Scale: Full Size, Material - Contemporary Building Materials

Facilities[edit]

The Front of Bond Hall, playing host to the University band

The School of Architecture is housed primarily in Bond Hall, a large building on the Notre Dame campus formerly known as the Lemonnier Library. The building served as the principal library of the entire campus from its construction in 1917 until Hesburgh Memorial Library was constructed in 1964. Bond Hall can be distinguished on campus by its white Indiana limestone exterior, classical Ionic archway, and round-arched windows. The building was renovated and expanded to become Bond Hall between 1995 and 1997 under the guidance of Thomas Gordon Smith, the Department Chair from 1989 to 1998 and current faculty member.

Bond Hall contains studio space for both undergraduate and students, several classrooms, and an auditorium that seats approximately 100 people. There is a gallery space that contains the School's stone cast collection and serves as the School's exhibition and project review space. The basement contains a computer lab for students who complete projects in Revit, AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop, and SketchUp. There are offices for the administration and the faculty of the School and a small eatery called Café Poche.

The center of the building (the former courtyard of the Lemonnier Library) houses the Architecture Library, which is part of the University of Notre Dame's Hesburgh Libraries. The collection, comprising approximately 32,000 volumes, over 80 current journals, and various other media, supports the research and instructional needs of the School of Architecture. There are three main components to the Architecture Library—the primary Architecture Library located in Bond Hall, the Jim R. Ryan Rare Book Room located in the main Architecture Library, and the Rome Architecture Reference Library located in the School of Architecture’s Rome Studies Center. In addition there are several special collections including the Furniture Collection, the Essential Texts for Students of Classical Architecture and Traditional Building, and the historic lantern slide collection available on Flickr.[7]

West Lake Hall, which opened in the fall of 2012, is located on the Western edge of campus and holds the School's wood shop. Classes for the Furniture Design and Architecture and the Building Arts Concentrations are held there. The building contains a second shop and studio area for the Industrial Design section of the Department of Art, Art History, & Design at the University of Notre Dame.

The freshman studio was located close by in Brownson Hall but was relocated to Bond Hall in the fall of 2012.

The School also maintains a campus in Rome, Italy, in the Centro Storico. Purchased in 1986 and located on Via Monterone, the building houses the Rome Studies Program, and consists of parts of two Roman palazzi. Facilities include studio space for approximately 50-55 students, offices for faculty and staff, an auditorium/meeting room, a small library, a computer cluster, and a student kitchen and dining area. Students live nearby in a hotel just off of Campo de' Fiori.[8] The year-long Rome program was founded in 1969 by the late Frank Montana and is now a requirement for all third-year architecture students.

The Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame[edit]

Since 2003, Richard H. Driehaus and the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture have together awarded the annual Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame for a lifetime of achievement in classical and traditional architecture and sustainable urbanism. The Driehaus Prize has been presented to architects representing various classical traditions, whose artistic impact reflects their commitment to cultural and environmental conservation. Past winners include Léon Krier, Allan Greenberg, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Andres Duany, Abdel-Wahed El-Wakil, and Robert A.M. Stern. Their work spans cultures and continents, establishing the Driehaus Prize as a forum for dialogue about the diversity of architectural tradition, but it is all part of a continuum that connects communities and sustains the social fabric that ties us all together. As Michael Lykoudis, Driehaus Prize Jury Chair and Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture, says: “Within the bodies of work of the Driehaus Prize winners, these ideas form an even larger and more important truth about the human experience—that the growth of a culture or community does not need to happen at the expense of its history and established value.”

Center for Building Communities[edit]

The Center for Building Communities is an initiative to address architectural and urban design needs around the country. Led by Professors Sallie Hood and Ron Sakal, the Center for Building Communities represents a transformation of the South Bend Downtown Design Center, which Notre Dame architecture students have worked with since 1995, broadening its scope to serve a national constituency.

The Center for Building Communities leads studios focusing on sustainable urban design and architectural development, paying particular attention to the local and regional characteristics of the communities the projects serve. Emphasis is placed on modular building technology and the ways it can facilitate the strengthening of communities through a blend of affordable and market-rate housing, civic, commercial and mixed-use buildings.

Champion Enterprises, Inc., known for factory-built construction throughout North America and the United Kingdom, underwrote the first two design studios affiliated with the Center. The first looked at urban infill in Elkhart, Indiana. The students designed single-family homes and mixed-use commercial and residential buildings for Elkhart’s downtown, using Champion’s wood and steel technologies. Another design studio used the same technologies to develop a master plan for the historic downtown of Conway, Arkansas. This collaboration further enhances students’ experiences through exposure to a wider range of architectural styles, and the technological, economic and environmental issues specific to different regions of the country.[9]

Summer Programs[edit]

The School often sponsors summer programs to introduce students to international traditional and classical architecture and urbanism. Previous programs have traveled to China, Japan, Cuba, Portugal, Greece, Italy, and the United Kingdom. The programs explore each country’s best practices in urban development, sustainable architecture and environmental planning.

The China and Japan programs, typically conducted every other year, look at Asia’s architectural traditions and its influence on high-quality modern urban living. The program examines how architects and planners have responded to evolving social demands compared to their counterparts in the West. New construction is also studied to learn how the country reflects that heritage even as it evolves.[10]

The School of Architecture also provides high school students with the opportunity to study architecture at Notre Dame for two weeks in the summer. The Career Discovery program is intended to help participants decide whether or not they want to pursue architecture in college, and if so, how they should prepare during their junior and senior years of high school.[11]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ School of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame "Twenty years ago the curriculum was reformed to focus on traditional and classical architecture and urbanism."
  2. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Undergraduate Program". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  3. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Graduate Program". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  4. ^ http://architecture.nd.edu/academics/graduate-program/
  5. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Rome Studies Program". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  6. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Concentrations". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  7. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Library". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  8. ^ Devine, Jane A. (1999). 100 Years of Architecture at Notre Dame: A History of the School of Architecture, 1898-1998. Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. pp. 25–35. ISBN 096705480X. 
  9. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Center for Building Communities". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  10. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Summer Programs". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 
  11. ^ University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. "Career Discovery for High School Students". Retrieved 14 April 2013. 

External links[edit]