Novoselytsia Raion

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Novoselytsia Raion
Новоселицький район
Raionul Noua Suliță
Raion
Flag of Novoselytsia Raion
Flag
Coat of arms of Novoselytsia Raion
Coat of arms
Novoselytskyi-Raion.png
Country  Ukraine
Province Chernivtsi Oblast
Established 1940
Admin. center Novoselytsia
Subdivisions
Government
 • Administration N/A
Area
 • Total 734 km2 (283 sq mi)
Population
 • Total 87,461
 • Density 120/km2 (310/sq mi)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Postal index 604XX
Area code 380-3733X
Website [?]

Novoselytsia Raion (Ukrainian: Новоселицький район, Romanian: Raionul Noua Suliță pronounced [raˈjonul ˈnowa ˈsulit͡sə]) is a raion (administrative district) in Chernivtsi Oblast, (province) in the west of Ukraine. The center of the raion is the town of Novoselytsia.

History and population[edit]

From 1775 to 1918, Bukovina was an administrative division of the Habsburg Monarchy, and a province of Austria–Hungary (Austrian half).[1] After World War I, Bucovina became part of Romania. In 1940, the northern half of Bucovina was annexed by the Soviet Union.

Austrian stamp cancelled around 1874 in the Bukovina province

According to the 2001 Ukrainian Census, the raion's population was 87,241. The ethnical composition was as follows:

Total Ukrainians Russians Romanians Moldovans Other
87,461 29,703 1,235 5,904 50,329 290

Sofia Rotaru was born in Marshintsy, one of the Romanian speaking villages of Novoselytskyi Raion.

Tarasivtsi village in the raion is notable as the only place in Ukraine where the Moldovan (Romanian) language has been designated as a regional language. This occurred after Ukraine permitted regional languages to be designated in August 2012 .[2]

Administrative divisions[edit]

Novoselytsia Raion has 1 town and 30 communes:

Of these, Boiany, Chornivka, Mahala, Sloboda, Pripruttia, Toporivtsi and Zelenyi Hai are in the historical region of Bukovina, while the remainder are in Bessarabia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Die postalischen Abstempelungen auf den österreichischen Postwertzeichen-Ausgaben 1867, 1883 und 1890, Wilhelm KLEIN, 1967
  2. ^ "Popov: No bilingualism in Kyiv", Kyiv Post, September 19, 2012

External links[edit]