Nozomi Hiroyama

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Nozomi Hiroyama
Personal information
Full name Nozomi Hiroyama
Date of birth (1977-05-06) May 6, 1977 (age 37)
Place of birth Sodegaura, Chiba, Japan
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Playing position Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1996–2000 JEF United Ichihara 120 (12)
2001 Cerro Porteño 29 (3)
2002 Sport Recife 0 (0)
2002–2003 Braga 8 (0)
2003–2004 Montpellier 7 (0)
2004–2008 Tokyo Verdy 79 (11)
2005 Cerezo Osaka (loan) 15 (0)
2009–2010 Thespa Kusatsu 73 (3)
2011–2012 Richmond Kickers 39 (0)
Total 370 (29)
National team
1997 Japan U20 4 (1)
2001[1] Japan 2 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 18:08, 16 November 2012 (UTC).

† Appearances (Goals).

‡ National team caps and goals correct as of December 31, 2010

Nozomi Hiroyama (廣山 望 Hiroyama Nozomi?, born May 6, 1977 in Sodegaura, Chiba) is a retired Japanese footballer who was active from 1996 until 2012.

Hiroyama played over 400 games during his career which included spells in Japan, France, Portugal, Paraguay, Brazil and United States, as well as earning two caps with the Japanese national team.

Career[edit]

Japan[edit]

Hiroyama began his career with his hometown team, JEF United Ichihara, in the Japanese J-League, helping his team to the final of the J. League Cup in 1998, and making 120 appearances and scoring 20 goals in total in his four years with the team.

South America[edit]

Hiroyama signed for Paraguayan side Cerro Porteño in 2001, and during his time in South America became the first Japanese footballer to play and score in the Copa Libertadores.[2] He moved to Brazilian side Recife prior to the 2002 season, but never managed to find a way into the team, and left for Europe halfway through the season without making a senior appearance.

Europe[edit]

Hiroyama signed for Portuguese team Braga in the winter of 2002, but made just 8 appearances for the team before moving on to French side Montpellier;[3] again, Hiroyama was unable to cement a place in the first team, and returned home to Japan prior to the beginning of the 2004 J-League season.

Japan, Part II[edit]

Hiroyama quickly established himself at Tokyo Verdy, helping his team win the Emperor's Cup in 2004, and playing in the 2006 AFC Champions League, but was unable to prevent his side being relegated into J2 that same year. He had a brief spell on loan at Cerezo Osaka in 2005, before moving on to J2 side Thespa Kusatsu in 2009,m having made 79 league appearances and scored 11 goals for Tokyo.

United States[edit]

Hiroyama signed with Richmond Kickers of the USL Professional Division on March 16, 2011,[4] and made his debut for his new team on April 9, in a game against the Pittsburgh Riverhounds[5]

On August 17, 2012, Hiroyama announced his retirement from professional football.[6]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Club Season League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
JEF Ichihara 1996 21 1 1 0 8 1 - 30 2
1997 30 1 4 2 6 1 40 4
1998 30 7 1 0 4 2 35 9
1999 30 2 3 0 0 0 33 2
2000 9 1 3 0 0 0 12 1
Cerro Porteño 2001 29 3 7 2 36 5
Sport Recife 2002 0 0 0 0
Braga 2002-03 8 0 0 0 1 0 9 0
Montpellier 2003-04 7 0 7 0
Tokyo Verdy 2004 4 0 1 0 1 0 6 0
Cerezo Osaka 2005 15 0 0 0 3 0 18 0
Tokyo Verdy 2006 27 4 1 0 2 0 30 4
2007 32 7 1 0 33 7
2008 16 0 1 0 4 1 21 1
Thespa Kusatsu 2009 44 3 2 0 46 3
2010 29 0 0 0 29 0
Richmond Kickers 2011 20 0 3 1 23 1
2012 19 0 1 0 20 0
Career total 370 29 22 3 27 5 9 2 428 39

International[edit]

Japan national team
Year Apps Goals
2001 2 0
Total 2 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ "HIROYAMA Nozomi". Japan National Football Team Database. 
  2. ^ "Copa Toyota Libertadores: Boca Juniors primer clasificado". CONMEBOL. 2001-03-23. Retrieved 2009-05-13. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Hiroyama makes history again". UEFA. 24 July 2003. Retrieved 26 December 2012. 
  4. ^ http://www.oursportscentral.com/services/releases/?id=4166994
  5. ^ http://www.uslsoccer.com/stats/2011/2175584.html
  6. ^ "17 years". nozomi-web. 17 August 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 

External links[edit]