Nuclear Age Peace Foundation

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Nuclear Age Peace Foundation
Napflogo.jpg
Formation 1982
Founders David Krieger
Legal status 501(c)3
Official language English
President David Krieger
Website www.wagingpeace.org

The Nuclear Age Peace Foundation was founded in 1982, and is composed of individuals and organizations worldwide who support worldwide efforts to abolish nuclear weapons.[1] The Nuclear Age Peace Foundation is a non-profit, non-partisan international education and advocacy organization. It has consultative status to the United Nations Economic and Social Council and is recognized by the UN as a Peace Messenger Organization.[1][unreliable source?][better source needed]

About[edit]

The main objective of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation is to achieve a world without nuclear weapons. Its mission is “to educate and advocate for peace and a world free of nuclear weapons, and to empower peace leaders.” [1]

NAPF engages in advocacy and education programs. Its educational projects include the Sunflower e-newsletter, which provides monthly information and analysis of nuclear and international security issues, and its Nuclear Files, which chronicles the history of nuclear weapons. NAPF works with elected officials and decision-makers around the world to advocate for nuclear weapons abolition. In addition, NAPF runs Peace Leadership training programs and hosts special events to honor peace leaders and pay tribute to the victims of nuclear weapons and war.

Nuclear Zero[edit]

In 2014, the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation consulted with the Marshall Islands when it filed cases against the nine nuclear-armed countries (United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China, Israel, India, Pakistan, North Korea) in the International Court of Justice and U.S. Federal District Court. The lawsuits make the central claim that these nations have failed to comply with their obligations under international law to pursue negotiations aimed at the complete elimination of their nuclear weapons.

Five of the nuclear-armed countries are parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). Article VI of the NPT requires that parties “pursue negotiations in good faith” aimed at “complete disarmament.” The lawsuits contend that the other four countries, while not bound to the NPT, are obligated by customary international law to pursue nuclear disarmament.

Presenting evidence that all nine nuclear-armed countries continue to update and enhance their nuclear arsenals while failing to take disarmament negotiations seriously, the lawsuits allege that each nuclear-armed country is in breach of its international obligations. The case filed in the U.S. Federal District Court is particularly historic, as it is the first time that the U.S. has been charged in domestic court for violation of an international disarmament treaty. The U.S. government has filed an official “notice of appearance” and has named a legal team to defend it in court. [2]

Members and Support[edit]

The organization is run by a core group of staff based in Santa Barbara, California.

David Krieger is a founder of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, and has served as its President since 1982. He is the author of many studies of peace in the Nuclear Age. He has written or edited 23 books and written hundreds of articles and book chapters. His latest books are ZERO: The Case for Nuclear Weapons Abolition (2013) and Summer Grasses, an Anthology of War Poetry (2014).

Rick Wayman is Director of Programs and Operations at the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Rick is a graduate of Marquette University’s College of Business Administration and has a Master’s Degree in Non-Profit Management and Political Advocacy from the School for International Training. Rick began working full-time on nuclear weapons issues with the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in the UK before moving to California in 2007 to join NAPF.

Paul K. Chappell is the Peace Leadership Director at the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. He is a veteran of the Iraqi War and dedicates his time to teaching and writing about waging peace and ending war. His most recent book, published in 2010, is The End of War: How Waging Peace Can Save Humanity, Our Planet and Our Future. In 2010 was nominated for the NAFRA Peace Award.

Advisory Council[edit]

Members of NAPF’s Advisory Council help spread the organization’s message worldwide. Members of the Advisory Council include:[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]