Nuclear Tipping Point

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Nuclear Tipping Point
Nuclear Tipping Point (film).jpg
Directed by Ben Goddard
Produced by Nuclear Threat Initiative
Written by Ben Goddard
Starring Henry Kissinger
George Shultz
Sam Nunn
William Perry
Colin Powell
Narrated by Michael Douglas
Music by Pete Kneser
Cinematography Bill Harrison
Edited by Aaron Goddard
Release date(s)
  • January 27, 2010 (2010-01-27)
Running time 56 minutes

Nuclear Tipping Point is a 2010 documentary film produced by the Nuclear Threat Initiative. It features interviews with four American government officials who were in office during the Cold War period, but are now advocating for the elimination of nuclear weapons. They are: Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, Sam Nunn, and William Perry.[1]

These "Four Cold Warriors", who each contributed in important ways to the nuclear arms race, built on classical deterrence theory, now argue that we must eliminate all nuclear weapons or face disaster on an enormous scale. Former Secretary Kissinger puts the new danger this way: "The classical notion of deterrence was that there was some consequences before which aggressors and evildoers would recoil. In a world of suicide bombers, that calculation doesn’t operate in any comparable way".[2] Shultz has said, "If you think of the people who are doing suicide attacks, and people like that get a nuclear weapon, they are almost by definition not deterrable".[3]

The film was screened at the White House on April 6, 2010.[4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Documentary Advances Nuclear Free Movement". NPR. Retrieved 2010-06-10. 
  2. ^ Ben Goddard (2010-01-27). "Cold Warriors say no nukes". The Hill. 
  3. ^ Hugh Gusterson (30 March 2012). "The new abolitionists". Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 
  4. ^ "White House to Host Screening Tonight of Nuclear Tipping Point". PRNewswire-USNewswire. Retrieved 2010-07-09. 
  5. ^ "White House to Host Screening Tonight of Nuclear Tipping Point". FOX Business. Retrieved 2010-06-10. [dead link]

External links[edit]