Nuclear micro-battery

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The new generation of swarm and communicating devices will explore new approaches: supplying information using power supplies generated from the world of living organisms or ATP molecules (similar to living things), micro-internal combustion engines, or even nuclear micro-batteries which are far removed from conventional batteries.[1]

Nuclear engineers at the University of Wisconsin, Madison have explored the possibilities of producing minuscule batteries which exploit the decrease in the number of radioactive nuclei of substances such as polonium or curium to produce electric energy. As an example of an integrated, self-powered application, the researchers have created an oscillating cantilever beam that is capable of consistent, periodic oscillations over very long time periods without the need for refueling. Ongoing work demonstrate that this cantilever is capable of radio frequency transmission, allowing MEMS devices to communicate with one another wirelessly.

These micro-batteries are very light and deliver enough energy to function as power supply for use in MEMS devices and further for supply for nanodevices.[2]

The energy released through the decrease in the number of radioactive nuclei is transformed into electric energy, which is restricted to the area of the device that contains the processor and the micro-battery that supplies it with energy.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Waldner, Jean-Baptiste (2008). Nanocomputers and Swarm Intelligence. London: ISTE John Wiley & Sons. pp. p9. ISBN 1-84704-002-0. 
  2. ^ Waldner, Jean-Baptiste (2007). Inventer l'Ordinateur du XXIème Siècle [1]. London: Hermes Science. pp. p172. ISBN 2-7462-1516-0. 
  3. ^ Waldner, Jean-Baptiste (2008). Nanocomputers and Swarm Intelligence. London: ISTE John Wiley & Sons. pp. p180–181. ISBN 1-84704-002-0.