Numéro

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This article is about a magazine. For other uses, see Numero.
Numéro
Numéro (magazine) 117 October 2010 cover.jpg
Editor-in-chief Elisabeth Djian[1]
Categories Fashion magazine
Frequency Monthly
Publisher Groupe Alain Ayache
Total circulation
(2008)
80,000[2]
Year founded 1998[1]
Country  France
Website www.numero-magazine.com
ISSN 1292-6213

Numéro is an international fashion magazine published by the Groupe Alain Ayache. It has a circulation of 80,000[2] and the French edition reached its 100th issue in February 2009. The magazine covers international fashion, beauty, design, health, architecture and decor, as well as spreads on trendsetting celebrities.

History[edit]

Numéro was founded in 1998 by Elisabeth Djian, the previous fashion director of the obscure Jill magazine, who is now Numéro's editor-in-chief.[1] When asked why she created Numéro, Djian commented, "I was bored with magazines that told me how to seduce a man. I wanted to create this magazine for an intelligent, smart woman who wants to read about art, design, music: not about stupidity – creams that take away wrinkles, you know, which is stupid."[2]

Editions[edit]

Numéro TOKYO[edit]

Launched in April 2007, Numéro Tokyo featured Kate Moss on their debut cover. Other well-known models that have graced past covers include Chloë Sevigny, Abbey Lee Kershaw, Agyness Deyn, Coco Rocha, Devon Aoki, Gisele Bundchen, Stella Tennant, Alexa Chung, and Victoria Beckham.[3] Musicians Lana Del Rey and Sky Ferreira have appeared on the March 2013 and July/August 2013 covers respectively.

Numéro China[edit]

In September 2010, the Numéro China magazine was launched as the third international edition for the market in China.[4]

Numéro Thailand[edit]

Following Numéro China's publication, Numéro Thailand was released in December 2012, the first issue featuring Thai models "Aokbab" and Khunying Mangmoom on the cover photographed by Thananon Thanakornkarn. The magazine reports on art, fashion, design, and culture.

Numéro Russia[edit]

In March 2013, Numéro Russia released their first issue featuring Naomi Campbell on the cover, styled by Ethan Park and photographed by Sebastian Kim. Former Vogue contributor, Andre Leon Talley, also made his debut as Numéro Russia's editor-at-large.[5] In an interview for Woman's Wear Daily, he says that he "... took the job because I love Russia and the salary was something fabulous ... Anna was very sympathetic and understood and she decided we remain on good terms and that I do the digital and the online. And I'm very happy to do it."[6]

Top ranking models Daphne Groeneveld and Ashleigh Good were featured on the magazine's April 2013 and May 2013 covers respectively. Soo Joo Park modeled for Numéro Russia's August 2013 cover.

Numéro Homme[edit]

Numéro Homme premiered in 2007 and is Numéro magazine's separate biannual international publication for men, with Philip Utz as the current editor-at-large.[7] The magazine's content centers on various aspects of the contemporary man's lifestyle, which includes fashion, beauty, travel, business and cars.

Photographers Sebastian Kim, Karl Lagerfeld, Jacob Sutton, Greg Kadel, and Jean Baptiste Mondino have frequently produced work for the publication. The magazine has featured several top male models, including Fernando Cabral, Yuri Pleskun, Arthur Gosse, Florian Van Bael, and Victor Nylander.[8] Jude Law modeled for Numéro Homme's Fall/Winter 2008 cover.

Criticism[edit]

The October 2010 issue of Numéro magazine was criticized for containing a spread shot by Greg Kadel featuring editorial model Constance Jablonski in blackface and wearing an afro.[9]

Two years later, Numéro TOKYO was criticized for having airbrushed model Karlie Kloss' visible ribcage out in a photo of her shot by Greg Kadel for the October 2012 issue.[10] According to The Daily Mail, Numéro hoped to avoid the possibility of controversy over Kloss' thin appearance because of an incident in December 2011 when photos of her shot by Steven Meisel were taken down from Vogue Italia's website because of anorexia concerns.[11]

In March 2013, the magazine came under fire for another blackface incident, this time involving model Ondria Hardin in a spread shot by Sebastian Kim and entitled "African Queen". When The Huffington Post contacted Numéro about the scandal, they responded via email with an apology and a disclaimer, stating that Kim's work "... is in line with his previous photographic creations, which insist on the melting pot and the mix of cultures, the exact opposite of any skin color based discrimination".[12] The photographer emailed The Huffington Post sometime after Numéro did, explaining that his aesthetic vision "... was based on 60's characters of Talitha Getty, Verushka and Marissa Berenson with middle eastern and Moroccan fashion inspiration" and that he did not intend for Hardin to appear black nor for the spread's title to be "African Queen".

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]