Nuozhadu Dam

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Nuozhadu Dam
Nuozhadu Dam is located in China
Nuozhadu Dam
Location of Nuozhadu Dam
Location Puer, Yunnan Province
Coordinates 22°39′22″N 100°25′06″E / 22.65611°N 100.41833°E / 22.65611; 100.41833Coordinates: 22°39′22″N 100°25′06″E / 22.65611°N 100.41833°E / 22.65611; 100.41833
Construction began 2004
Opening date 2012
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Embankment, central core, rock-fill
Impounds Lancang (Mekong) River
Height 261.5 m (858 ft)
Length 608 m (1,995 ft)
Width (crest) 18 m (59 ft)
Spillway type Service, controlled side channel chute
Spillway capacity 31,318 m3/s (1,106,000 cu ft/s)
Reservoir
Creates Nuozhadu Reservoir
Total capacity 21,749,000,000 m3 (17,632,000 acre·ft)
Catchment area 140,000 km2 (54,000 sq mi)
Surface area 320 km2 (120 sq mi)
Power station
Commission date 2012-2014
Hydraulic head 187 m (614 ft)
Turbines 9 x 650 MW Francis-type
Installed capacity 5,850 MW

Nuozhadu Dam (simplified Chinese: 糯扎渡大坝; traditional Chinese: 糯扎渡大壩; pinyin: Nuòzhādù Dàbà) is an embankment dam on the Lancang (Mekong) River in Yunnan Province, southwest China. The dam is 261.5 m (858 ft) tall, and creates a reservoir with a normal capacity of 21,749,000,000 m3 (17,632,000 acre·ft) at a level of 812 m (2,664 ft) asl. The purpose of the dam is hydroelectric power production along with flood control and navigation. The dam will support a power station with nine generators, each with generating capacity of 650 MW. The total generating capacity of the project is 5,850 MW.[1] Construction on the project began in 2004; the dam's first generator went online 6 September 2012 and the remaining generators in 2014.[2] The construction and management of the project was implemented by Huaneng Power International Ltd., which has a concession to build, own and operate hydroelectric dams on China's stretch of the Mekong River.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nuozhadu Hydropower Project". Chinese National Committee on Large Dams. Retrieved 6 January 2011. 
  2. ^ "Yunnan's largest hydroelectric dam goes online". Go Kunming. Retrieved 15 May 2013.