Nyala, Sudan

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Nyala
Nyala is located in Sudan
Nyala
Nyala
Location in Sudan
Coordinates: 12°2′11″N 24°52′37″E / 12.03639°N 24.87694°E / 12.03639; 24.87694
Country Flag of Sudan.svg Sudan
State South Darfur
Elevation [1] 2,208 ft (673 m)
Population (2007)
 • Total 565,734

Nyala (Daju: "the place of chatting or a theatre") is the capital of South Darfur state in the south-west of Sudan.

History[edit]

Nyala was the capital of the Daju Empire, which was established around Jebel Um-Kurdós.

When the United Kingdom conquered the present-day Sudan, the British commander-in-chief met Sultan Adam Suleiman in 1932, seeking his advice for his knowledge of the best places in terms of availability of water sources and land topography in order to establish the British Administration Headquarters in Darfur. Sultan Adam Suleiman had chosen Nyala for that purpose. However, many sites of ancient antiquities, pottery, engraved pictures of battles, horses, animals and hunting are still awaiting for further scientific archaeological work at Jebel Daju.[2] The most important archaeological sites undiscovered yet are Nari, Kedingnyir, Dobo, Simiat Hills, Jebel Keima, Kalokitting, Jebel Wara, and Jebel Marra itself.

During the ongoing Darfur conflict, thousands of internally displaced persons have gathered near the city in the hopes of protection. The refugee camp in the southern portion of Nyala is Kalma. Around 90,000 people reside in the camp.[3][4]

Economy[edit]

Local industries produce textiles, as well as processed food, and leather goods. Nyala has terminus ends for both road and railway, and also has a domestic airport, Nyala Airport. Nyala serves as a trading place for gum arabic and has branches of the Agricultural Bank of Sudan and the People's Cooperative Bank.[1] Nyala is home to Nyala University, a public university.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Nyala
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 31
(87)
33
(91)
36
(96)
38
(100)
38
(100)
36
(96)
32
(89)
31
(87)
33
(91)
35
(95)
33
(91)
31
(87)
33.9
(92.5)
Average low °C (°F) 15
(59)
17
(62)
20
(68)
22
(71)
23
(73)
23
(73)
22
(71)
21
(69)
21
(69)
21
(69)
19
(66)
16
(60)
20
(67.5)
Precipitation cm (inches) 0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.3
(0.1)
2.3
(0.9)
5
(2)
12.4
(4.9)
14.5
(5.7)
8
(3)
1.5
(0.6)
0
(0)
0
(0)
44
(17.2)
Source: Weatherbase [5]

The Amel Center[edit]

Run by Mossaad Mohamed Ali Mossaad and former Secretary-General of the United Nations Kofi Annan, the Amel Center is a treatment and rehabilitation center for victims of torture in Nyala. The center has earned Mossaad and Annan the Olof Palme Prize.[6] Mohammed Ahmed Abdallah served as director of the center until 2007, earning the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award for his work.[7]

Nyala in western Sudan (bottom left)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chauhan, Yamini (15 March 2013). "Nyala (Sudan)". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Arkell, A. J. (June 1951). "The History of Darfur 1200-1700 A.D.". Sudan Notes and Records (University of Khartoum) 32 (1): pp. 37–70. JSTOR 41724725.  edit
  3. ^ Steele, Jonathan (27 October 2007). "Violence flares in Darfur's Kalma refugee camp as a new cycle of persecution begins". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "Sudan 'kills refugees in Darfur'". BBC News Online. 26 August 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2014. 
  5. ^ "Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Nyala, Sudan". Weatherbase. 2011.  Retrieved on November 24, 2011.
  6. ^ Savage, James (30 January 2007). "Annan honoured with Olof Palme Prize". The Local (Stockholm). Retrieved 2 February 2014. 
  7. ^ "Mohammed Ahmed Abdallah, Sudan". Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights. Retrieved 2 July 2012. 

References[edit]

  • Arckell, A.J., History of Darfur 1200-1700 A.D. SNR.
  • UNESCO General History of Africa, Vol. IV, Abridged Edition: Africa from the Twelfth to the Sixteenth Century (UNESCO General History of Africa) by Joseph Ki-Zerbo and DjiBril Tamsir Niane (Paperback - May 10, 1998) – Abridged.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 12°03′N 24°53′E / 12.050°N 24.883°E / 12.050; 24.883