O. C. Fisher

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Ovie Clark "O.C." Fisher
O. C. Fisher.jpg
Member of the
U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's 21st district
In office
January 3, 1943 – December 31, 1974
Preceded by Charles L. South
Succeeded by Bob Krueger
District attorney
Texas 51st Judicial District
In office
1937–1943
Member
Texas House of Representatives
53rd District
In office
1935–1937
County Attorney
Tom Green County
In office
1931–1935
Personal details
Born (1903-11-12)November 12, 1903
Junction, Texas
Died December 9, 1994(1994-12-09) (aged 91)
Junction, Texas
Resting place Junction Cemetery
Junction, Texas
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Marian E. De Walsh
Children Rhoda
Residence San Angelo, Texas
Alma mater University of Texas at Austin

Baylor Law School

Profession Attorney

Ovie Clark Fisher (November 22, 1903 – December 9, 1994) was an attorney and author who served his country for 32 years as United States Congressman from the 21st District of Texas.

Biography[edit]

O.C. Fisher was born Ovie Clark Fisher in Junction, Kimble County, Texas to[1]Jobe Bazilee and Rhoda Catherine Clark Fisher. He married Marian E. De Walsh on September 11, 1927. A daughter named Rhoda was the couple's only child.

Fisher attended University of Texas at Austin, University of Colorado, and Baylor University[2] where he received his LL.B. He was admitted to the bar in 1929. Fisher practiced law in San Angelo for two years[3] and in 1931 was elected County Attorney in Tom Green County, Texas.

Clark Fisher served the 53rd District of Texas in the Texas House of Representatives[4] 1935–1937. 1937–1943, Fisher was District Attorney for the[5]51st Judicial District of Texas.

In 1942, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives[6] as a Democrat and served in the 78th United States Congress[7] through the 93rd United States Congress. After heart surgery[8] in 1973, Fisher announced that he would not be standing for re-election[9] in 1974.

O.C. Fisher died[10] December 9, 1994.

Baylor University is the repository for[11] the O.C. Fisher Papers.

Fraternal memberships[edit]

O.C. Fisher had membership[12] in the following organizations:

O.C. Fisher Reservoir[edit]

In 1975, San Angelo Lake, a reservoir managed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, was renamed O.C. Fisher Reservoir[13] in his honor. San Angelo State Park[14] is on the shores of the reservoir.

O.C. Fisher bibliography[edit]

  • Fisher, O.C. (1937). It Occurred in Kimble The Story of a Texas County. Anson Jones Press. ASIN: B001KCW7DU. 
  • Members of the Potomac Corral of the Westerners, (O.C. Fisher) (1960). Great Western Indian Fights. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0-585-32514-6. 
  • Fisher, O.C. (1963). The Texas Heritage of the Fishers and the Clarks. Anson Jones Press. ASIN: B0007E8BS2. 
  • Fisher, O.C.; Dykes, J.C. (1967). King Fisher: His Life and Times. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-0711-1. 
  • Fisher, O.C. (1978). Cactus Jack : A Biography of John Nance Garner. Texian Press. ISBN 978-0-87244-066-1. 
  • Fisher, O.C. (1980). From New Deal to Watergate. Texian Press. ASIN: B0006XMO1O. 
  • Fisher, O.C. (1980). Political Miscellany. Texian Press. ASIN: B0006E26IO. 
  • Fisher, O.C.; Pope, Jack; Anderson, Gertrude; Gillman, Geneva (1988). John Berry and His Children. Jack Pope. ISBN 978-0-9621053-0-2. 
  • O.C., Fisher (1985). The Speaker of Nubbin Ridge: The Story of the Modern Angora Goat. Talley Press. ASIN: B000712VUO. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Leatherwood, Art: Ovie Clark Fisher from the Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved June 19, 2010. Texas State Historical Association
  2. ^ "About O. C. Fisher". Baylor University Waco, Texas. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Fisher, Ovie Clark". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  4. ^ Kestenbaum, Lawrence. "Texas: State House of Representatives, 1930s". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Fisher Biographical Chronology". Baylor University Waco. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  6. ^ Kestenbaum, Lawrence. "Texas: U.S. Representatives, 1940s". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Committees Served-O.C. Fisher". Baylor University Waco. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  8. ^ "What the Politicians Say". Texas Monthly. 1973 September: 55. 
  9. ^ Brigance, Jim (April 25, 1974). "Contest Looms for U.S. House Seats". The Victoria Advocate. 
  10. ^ "Ex-Rep O.C. Fisher of Texas, Who Served 32 Years in Congress, Dies at 91". The Dallas Morning News. December 11, 1994. 
  11. ^ "O. C. Fisher Papers". Baylor University Waco. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  12. ^ Kestenbaum, Lawrence. "Kimble Co-The Political Graveyard". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  13. ^ "O.C. Fisher Reservoir". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  14. ^ "San Angelo State Park". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 

Source[edit]