OU Campus

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OU Campus logo.png

OU Campus is a web content management system (CMS) for colleges, universities, and other higher education institutions.[1]

OU Campus was launched in 1999 using the cloud computing, software as a service (SaaS) product delivery model.[2] It was developed by OmniUpdate, a privately owned company headquartered in Camarillo, CA. OmniUpdate was started by software developers Tom Nalevanko, Lance Merker, and Yves Lempereur (developer of BinHex 4.0).

Technology[edit]

The product uses a push technology. OU Campus can be accessed via the cloud - also known as software as a service (SaaS). The underlying platform of OU Campus is developed in Java, and uses XSLT 3.0 for template transformation.[3] OU Campus uses open standards, including XML, HTML, and CSS and is extensible through APIs. As a decoupled system, OU Campus works with any server-side technology (e.g., PHP, ASP, .NET, ColdFusion) and for templates uses XHTML/HTML5 and CSS, as well as XML/XSL.[4][5] The templates are customizable so that developers can create sites using popular web development techniques including Responsive web design to adapt to all screen sizes and devices. OU Campus does not store page content in a database; rather, each page is stored as an XML file on the CMS server. It is compatible with Internet Explorer, Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari. OU Campus' push technology architecture requires a separate database for some applications that use interactive content such as forms and surveys. These applications can be handled through the Live Delivery Platform (LDP), which provides a server-side module for plug-in application architecture. LDP is accessed and managed through OU Campus.[6]

Features[edit]

  • Custom WYSIWYG toolbars
  • Source code editing
  • Instant publishing (no queues)
  • Multi-channel output (e.g., HTML, XML, PDF, text, mobile)
  • Content repurposing[7] -- OU Campus allows users to repurpose content through Assets. Changes made to an asset are automatically changed on every page where that asset resides.
  • Accessibility check
  • Multi-browser preview
  • Asset management[8]
  • Facebook and Twitter integration[9]
  • Global find and replace
  • Updates made to web pages can be simultaneously made to mobile pages
  • OU Campus separates content from design, so users can style their content without breaking the page layout and design

Known customers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fienen, Michael. "Results: Higher Ed CMA Usage Survey, 2011". Retrieved 7 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Merker, Lance (11/09/2009). "Considering Enterprise Software as a Service?". University Business. Retrieved 7 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Merker, Lance. "OmniUpdate Releases Version 9". 
  4. ^ Merker, Lance. "Learning to Leverage XML for Higher Ed Web CMS". 
  5. ^ Schaffhauser, Dian. "9 Best Practices for Implementing a CMS". 
  6. ^ Spick, Geoff. "Digital Asset Management Takes Front Seat for Higher Education Web CMS". CMS Wire. Retrieved 7 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Berthiaume, Dan. "OmniUpdate Enhances Content Reuse in OUCampus Update". 
  8. ^ Spick, Geoff. "Digital Asset Management Takes Front Seat for Higher Education Web CMS". 
  9. ^ Guseva, Irina. "OmniUpdate Adds Social Features to Web CMS". 
  10. ^ "Content Management System". 
  11. ^ "University Technology Services". 
  12. ^ "Submit an Announcement". 
  13. ^ Mosinskis, Peter; Daniel Martinez. "Web Accessibility for Your Entire Organization with California State University Channel Islands". OmniUpdate. WebEx. Retrieved 17 October 2013. 
  14. ^ "Western Kentucky University using OU Campus". Retrieved 17 October 2013. 
  15. ^ "XSLT Platform Change". 
  16. ^ "Can a CMS make your job easier?". 
  17. ^ "CMS Training". 
  18. ^ Gerber, Nathan. "Working In The Clouds". CMS Wire. 
  19. ^ Gatewood, Justin. "How Victor Valley College is Using OmniUpdate's OU Campus". .eduGuru. 

External links[edit]