Oak Ridges—Markham

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the provincial electoral district, see Oak Ridges—Markham (provincial electoral district).
Oak Ridges—Markham
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Oak Ridges-Markham.png
Oak Ridges—Markham is in south-central Ontario, just north of Toronto
Coordinates: 43°55′45″N 79°31′37″W / 43.92917°N 79.52694°W / 43.92917; -79.52694Coordinates: 43°55′45″N 79°31′37″W / 43.92917°N 79.52694°W / 43.92917; -79.52694
Location of the federal district constituency office in King City (as of 26 August 2010)
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Paul Calandra
Conservative
District created 2003
First contested 2004
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 228,997
Electors (2011) 151,584
Area (km²)[1] 679.90
Pop. density (per km²) 336.8
Census divisions York
Census subdivisions Markham, Richmond Hill, Whitchurch–Stouffville, King
Map of Oak Ridges-Markham

Oak Ridges—Markham is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. Its population in 2006 was 169,645.,[2] with 136,755 electors, the highest of any riding in Canada. By 2011, the riding's population had risen to 228,997, the largest population of all ridings in Canada.[3]

The district covers part of the suburbs north of Toronto. It includes the town of Whitchurch–Stouffville, most of the township of King (excepting extreme northeast) the northern portions of the town of Richmond Hill (including all of Oak Ridges), and the northern and eastern portions of the city of Markham.

The electoral district was created in 2004 52.5% from Oak Ridges, 30% from Markham, 13% from Vaughan—King—Aurora, and 4.5% from York North riding.

Demographics[edit]

Communities in Oak Ridges—Markham are the destination for many immigrants to Canada, composing about 41.6% of the population, or about 70,000 of its residents.[2] For 72,440 residents, neither English nor French, the official languages of Canada, is their mother tongue,[2] though most have knowledge of English (148,975), French (160), or both (12,885).[2] Most immigrants become citizens, as 11,155 immigrants were not Canadian citizens as of the Canada 2006 Census.[2]

The primarily urban district has a low proportion of Aboriginal residents compared to other parts of Canada, with just 625 people identifying themselves of such descent.[2] It is also home to 70,070 residents who identify themselves as visible minorities, more than half of which are Chinese Canadians[2] and about 20% are Black Canadians.[2]

At the 2006 census, the participation rate of residents in the work force was 71.3%, and the electoral district unemployment rate was 5%,[2] below the national average of 6.3%.[4]

The district is the second-largest electoral district in Canada by population, next to Brampton West which had 170,422 residents at the 2006 census.[5] It was the 64th largest in 2001, with a population of 111,276,[6] but had the greatest population growth from 2001 to 2006, about 52.5%.[7]

Boundaries[edit]

According to Elections Canada, Oak Ridges—Markham consists of that part of the Regional Municipality of York composed of:

(a) the Town of Whitchurch–Stouffville;

(b) the part of the Township of King south of Highway No. 9;

(c) the part of the Town of Richmond Hill lying north and east of a line drawn from the western town limit east along Gamble Road, south along Yonge Street and east along Elgin Mills Road East to the eastern town limit; and

(d) the part of the City of Markham lying north and east of a line drawn from the western town limit east along 16th Avenue, south along McCowan Road, east along Highway No. 7, and south along 9th Line to the southern town limit.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following member of the Canadian House of Commons:

Parliament Years Member Party
Oak Ridges—Markham
Riding created from Oak Ridges, Markham,
Vaughan—King—Aurora and York North
38th  2004 − 2006     Lui Temelkovski Liberal
39th  2006 − 2008
40th  2008 − 2011     Paul Calandra Conservative
41st  2011 − Present

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Paul Calandra 46,241 51.12 +8.88 $133,192
Liberal Lui Temelkovski 25,561 28.26 -13.26 $108,951
New Democratic Janice Hagan 15,229 16.84 +7.45 $4,650
Green Trifon Haitas 2,349 2.60 -4.23 $0.00
Progressive Canadian John Sicilano 1,080 1.19 $564
Total valid votes/Expense limit 90,460 100.00 $134,351
Total rejected ballots 430 0.47
Turnout 90,890 59.96 +4.30
Eligible voters 151,584
Conservative hold Swing +11.07%
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Paul Calandra 32,028 42.24 +3.77 $112,693
Liberal Lui Temelkovski 31,483 41.52 -5.53 $68,266
New Democratic Andy Arifin 7,126 9.39 -0.49 $2,020
Green Richard Taylor 5,184 6.83 +2.24 $8,063
Total valid votes/Expense limit 75,821 100.00 $120,647
Turnout 76,111 55.66 -11.23
     Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +4.65
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Lui Temelkovski 35,048 47.05 -4.68 $55,610
Conservative Bob Callow 28,695 38.47 +4.96 $92,644
New Democratic Pamela Courtot 7,369 9.88 +1.10 $8,822
Green Steve Armes 3,431 4.59 +0.70 $1,852
Total valid votes/Expense limit 74,543 100.00 $98,012
Turnout 74,834 66.89 +3.51
     Liberal hold Swing -4.82
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Lui Temelkovski 31,964 51.73 -1.34
Conservative Bob Callow 20,712 33.51 -9.10
New Democratic Pamela Courtot 5,430 8.78 +5.94
Green Bernadette Manning 2,406 3.89
Progressive Canadian Jim Conrad 820 1.32
Christian Heritage Maurice Whittle 458 0.74
Total valid votes 61,790 100.00
Turnout 62,145 63.38
     Liberal hold Swing +3.88

2004 change is based on redistributed results. Conservative change is compared to a combination of Canadian Alliance and Progressive Conservative votes.

Future[edit]

As per the seat rearrangement that takes place every 10 years along with the bill to add 30 more seats there is going to be a change for the next election. Due to Oak-Ridges Markham having a population of 115.60% over the Ontario quota (Canada's most populous riding) it is going under substantial change.[8] The current riding will be renamed King—Vaughan and will just be the Township of King south of Highway 9 along with the part of the City of Vaughan north of Major Mackenzie Drive west of Highway 400 and north of Rutherford Road east of Hwy 400.[9]

The part that is the town of Whitchurch–Stouffville and in the City of Markham east of Ontario Highway 48 / Main Street Markham/ York Regional Road 68 will be incorporated into the new Markham—Stouffville riding.[10] The part in the town of Richmond Hill will be part of the new Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill riding.[11] Finally, the part in the city of Markham west of the above mentioned roads will be part of the new Markham—Unionville riding,[12] which will be different from the existing riding with the same name.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Stastistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Federal Electoral District Profile of Oak Ridges — Markham, Ontario (2003 Representation Order), 2006 Census". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  3. ^ Census Canada, Population and dwelling counts, for Canada and federal electoral districts, 2006; National Post, Canada Census 2011: Harper could reap the benefits as census suggests new ridings, February 8, 2012.
  4. ^ "Work — Unemployment Rate". Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  5. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (sorted by 2006 population)". Federal electoral districts (FEDs) – 2003 Representation Order. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  6. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (sorted by 2001 population)". Federal electoral districts (FEDs) – 2003 Representation Order. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  7. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (sorted by population growth)". Federal electoral districts (FEDs) – 2003 Representation Order. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  8. ^ Proposed Boundaries – Ontario
  9. ^ Oak Ridges – Proposed Boundaries
  10. ^ Markham—Stouffville – Proposed Boundaries
  11. ^ Aurora—Richmond Hill – Proposed Boundaries
  12. ^ Markham—Unionville – Proposed Boundaries

References[edit]

Notes[edit]