BART to Oakland International Airport Automated Guideway Transit

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BART to Oakland International Airport Automated Guideway Transit
Oakland International Airport AGT station in background.
Oakland International Airport AGT station
in background.
Overview
Owner BART
Locale Oakland, California, USA
Transit type Automated guideway transit (AGT)
Number of lines 1
Number of stations 2
Operation
Operation will start Fall 2014
Operator(s) BART
Character Mostly elevated, with at-grade and underground sections
Number of vehicles 4 trains
Train length 3-cars
Headway 4 minutes
Technical
System length 3.2 mi (5.1 km)
System map
BART Oakland Airport Connector
Richmond–Fremont / Fremont–Daly City
Dublin/Pleasanton–Daly City
Coliseum/Oakland Airport 2014
Amtrak
I‑880
Doolittle planned
SR 61 (Doolittle Dr.)
Oakland Int'l Airport Oakland International Airport 2014

The BART to Oakland International Airport Automated Guideway Transit (AGT) system is an under-construction 3.2-mile (5.1 km) people mover line that will run from BART's existing Oakland Coliseum Station to its other terminus, the Oakland International Airport station in the vicinity of Oakland International Airport's terminal buildings. This system will be integrated into BART's existing fare system, and is scheduled to open for public service in fall 2014. It was previously known as the Oakland Airport Connector project.

Overview[edit]

The BART to Oakland International Airport Automated Guideway Transit (AGT) system will initially have two termini stations, with a third intermediate station (Doolittle Station) to be built at a later date, when funding permits.

When completed, it will replace the current AirBART shuttle bus service. The project is expected to cost approximately $484 million and is currently scheduled to open for public service in fall 2014.[1]

Fares[edit]

On June 12, 2014, the BART Board of Directors voted to set the base fare for travel on the BART to Oakland International Airport AGT system at $6.[2] The Board left open the possibility that temporary promotional fares could be introduced in the future. In addition, seniors, people with disabilities, and children age 12 and under will be eligible for BART’s 62.5% discount. Subject to approval, BART staff planned to recommend at a later Board meeting that airport employees continue to pay a discounted fare of $2.00 for the trip on the new service.[2]

Operations[edit]

The BART to Oakland International Airport AGT system will be operated by BART and will be integrated into BART's existing fare system.

However, as an AGT system as opposed to a rapid transit one, it will not utilize existing BART rolling stock and it will not be physically connected with existing BART tracks. Instead it will have its own fleet of automated guideway transit (AGT) vehicles that will operate on fixed guideways. The cable-drawn vehicles will be manufactured by DCC Doppelmayr Cable Car and can form trains of up to 4 cars. The line is designed to have an approximate headway of 4.5 minutes and to complete a one-way trip in approximately 8 minutes, with an on-time performance of more than 99.5%.[3][4]

Initially there will be four 3-car trains (113 passengers each),[2] but the system can accommodate an expansion to four 4-car trains (148 passengers each).[5]

The 3.2-mile (5.1 km) AGT route between Oakland Coliseum Station and the airport is mostly elevated, largely in the median of Hegenberger Road, with one underground section as it passes under Doolittle Drive, and one at-grade section just west of that point, before the AGT enters the airport itself once again on an elevated guideway.[1]

The OAC's connection to the existing BART system at Coliseum/Oakland Airport station will resemble the AirTrain JFK and AirTrain Newark airport people movers' existing off-airport connections to other rail transit lines. In this case however, both the airport people mover and connecting rail transit will be operated by BART and share the same fare system. The OAC's platforms at Coliseum/Oakland Airport station will be connected to the south ends of the existing BART platforms via an aerial walkway.[1]

Funding[edit]

The $484 million for funding the project came from local government funds ($275 million, 57%), state funds ($79 million, 16%), federal funds ($25 million, 5%), and BART deficit spending ($106 million, 22%).[1]

In late 2009 just prior to the award of the contract to construct the system, the project lost $70 million of federal stimulus funding because the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) found that BART was out of conformance with Title VI. Among other non-OAC considerations, the FTA cited that BART did not complete the necessary analysis to determine if the future change in service will disproportionately impact low-income or minority communities. The FTA forced the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to reallocate the funding.[6]

By September 2010, all necessary Federal and state funding for the OAC had been re-established, and a groundbreaking ceremony was held on October 20.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "BART to Oakland International Airport". Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART). June 20, 2013. Retrieved 2014-08-17. 
  2. ^ a b c "BART Board sets fares for BART to Oakland International Airport service". Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART). June 12, 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-17. 
  3. ^ "BART Board awards Oakland Airport Connector contract in historic vote". Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART). December 10, 2009. Retrieved 2014-08-17. 
  4. ^ "Oakland Airport Connector BART Special Board Meeting" (pdf). Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART). December 10, 2009. Retrieved 2014-08-17. 
  5. ^ "Oakland Airport Connector". Doppelmayr Cable Car GmbH & Co KG. Retrieved 2014-07-15. 
  6. ^ Mie, Ayako (February 21, 2010). "$70 million for airport connector project to be diverted to regional transit agencies". Oakland North. Retrieved 2014-07-15. 
  7. ^ "BART breaks ground Wednesday on Oakland Airport Connector". Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART). October 20, 2010. Retrieved 2014-07-15. 

External links[edit]