Oblivion (comics)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Oblivion
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Iceman volume 1 #3 (March, 1985)
Created by J. M. DeMatteis
Alan Kupperberg
In-story information
Notable aliases Lord of the Outer Void
Abilities Nigh infinite cosmic powers
Virtually omniscient and omnipresent

Oblivion is a character in the Marvel Comics universe. His first appearance was in Iceman #3 and he was created by J. M. DeMatteis and Alan Kupperberg. Oblivion is a cosmic entity and another aspect of Death. Oblivion represents non-existence and is a counterforce to the expanding universe.

Fictional character biography[edit]

Oblivion came into existence together with the cosmic entities Eternity, Infinity and Death when the universe was created and these beings see each other as siblings. Another being, known as Galactus, was born later from the ashes of the previous universe and is also seen as a sibling by these beings. Oblivion has a very close relationship with Death and the two may be different aspects of the same being, just as Infinity and Eternity are. Just like Eternity and Death have a strong rivalry, Oblivion has a strong rivalry with Infinity, a rivalry usually fought through avatars. Oblivion usually resides inside a pocket dimension, known as the Outer Void.

Oblivion has a daughter, the being known as Mirage, who assumed the human form of Marge Smith. As Marge Smith, Mirage tried to turn Robert Drake, the superhero Iceman, against her father. In return, Oblivion used three aliens known as White Light, the Idiot and Kali to attack his daughter. He also tried to turn Iceman against Mirage, but in the end Iceman convinced the two to settle their differences peacefully.[volume & issue needed]

In his rivalry with Infinity, Oblivion empowered Maelstrom as his avatar and sent him his agent, Deathurge, to assist him. As Oblivion's agent, Maelstrom tried to destroy the whole universe, but he was stopped by Quasar, the avatar of Eon. Oblivion, Infinity, Death, and Eternity then came to a new agreement.[volume & issue needed]

Maelstrom returned to life later and came into conflict with the Great Lakes Avengers. During this conflict, Deathurge was sent repeatedly to collect the souls of Great Lakes Avengers who died. When he tried to claim the soul of Squirrel Girl's sidekick Monkey Joe, Mr. Immortal used the opportunity to grab Deathurge, now just the size and shape of a squirrel, and defeat him. The recently deceased Doorman encountered Oblivion, who made him his new agent, telling him that Deathurge had failed him. At Christmas, Deathurge tried to regain his position, but failed the test Oblivion gave him.[volume & issue needed]

When Drax and Quasar are temporarily 'killed' by Mentor as a way to get Moondragon back, the two end up in the realm of Oblivion. The events that ensue, which involve Drax and Phylla fighting Maelstrom and the Dragon of the Moon alongside Wendell Vaughn, have resulted in Phylla being transformed into the new "Avatar of Death" that Oblivion seems to be planning to use in the upcoming War of Kings.[volume & issue needed]

Oblivion is seen observing events between Galactus, Scrier, Silver Surfer, Thor and The Other. He reveals that the Chaos King was but an aspect of himself.[1]

Powers and abilities[edit]

Oblivion possesses vast cosmic powers which he can use for various effects. As an abstract cosmic entity it has nigh infinite power, is virtually omniscient and omnipresent, and cannot be truly destroyed without devastating consequences for the universe since the concept of Oblivion is a necessary and fundamental aspect of existence.

Originally Oblivion only had dominance over creatures who did not die, but were wiped out from existence (due to a time paradox or being hit by the Ultimate Nullifier for example), while his counterpart Death was set over the actual dead. In his recent appearances though, Oblivion has used Deathurge and Doorman as "Angels of Death", sending them to bring him the souls of creatures who have actually died.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Mighty Thor Annual #1

External links[edit]