Cape May County, New Jersey

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Cape May County, New Jersey
Cape may.jpg
Sunset on the Cape May Peninsula
Map of New Jersey highlighting Cape May County
Location in the state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location in the U.S.
Founded 1685
Seat Cape May Court House[1]
Largest city Lower Township (population)
Middle Township (area)
Area
 • Total 620.42 sq mi (1,607 km2)
 • Land 251.42 sq mi (651 km2)
 • Water 368.99 sq mi (956 km2), 59.47%
Population
 • (2010) 97,265[2]
 • Density 382/sq mi (147.3/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Website www.co.cape-may.nj.us
Wildwood at night.

Cape May County is the southernmost county in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 97,265,[2] decreasing by 5,061 (-4.9%) from the 102,326 counted in the 2000 Census,[3] retaining its position as the state's second-least populous county; One of only two counties to lose population in the decade since 2000, the decline was the largest percentage decrease of any county statewide and the second-largest in absolute terms.[4][5] A consistently popular summer destination with 30 miles (48 km) of beaches, Cape May attracts vacationers from New Jersey and surrounding states, with the summer population exceeding 800,000. Tourism generates annual revenues of $5.3 billion, making it the county's single largest industry, with leisure and hospitality being the Cape May's largest employment category.[6]

The county is part of the Ocean City Metropolitan Statistical Area[7] as well as the Delaware Valley Combined Statistical Area.[8] Its county seat is the Cape May Court House section of Middle Township.[9][1]

Geography[edit]

Most of the county lies on a peninsula that juts into Delaware Bay. It is flat and coastal. Sea level is the lowest point; the highest elevation is found at three areas in Belleplain State Forest in the county's northern corner which are approximately 60 feet (18 m) above sea level.[10]

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 620.42 square miles (1,606.9 km2), of which 251.42 square miles (651.2 km2) of it (40.5%) of it was land and 368.99 square miles (955.7 km2) of it (59.5%) was water.[11]

Adjacent counties[edit]

¹ across Delaware Bay; no land border

National protected area[edit]

Climate[edit]

Given its maritime influence and southernmost location within New Jersey, Cape May County has relatively mild wintertime temperatures. Conversely, the county witnesses lower summertime temperatures than most places in the state, making it a popular place to escape the heat as well. It is in zone 7a/7b, which is the same as parts of Coastal Virginia, therefore being Humid/Temperate. Its climate is suited to growing traditional Northeastern plants, including English Yew, Boxwoods and Sugar Maples. Because of the warmer wintertime temperatures, Hardy Palms, including Trachycarpus fortunei (Chinese Windmill Palm) and Needle Palms, would work quite well in the landscape, these plants having survived for many years also in other parts of coastal New Jersey, from Sandy Hook to Cape May. Wine grapes also do particularly well, given the long growing season. The wine industry is growing – four vineyards and wineries operate in the county now – three more are planted and on the way. The county had a once-vibrant lima bean industry that covered as much as 5,000 acres (2,000 ha) of land and West Cape May still calls itself the "lima bean capital of the world" and hosts an annual lima bean festival, though wine grapes are quickly becoming more common and many wineries dot the landscape.[12]

According to the Köppen climate classification system, Cape May has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa) typical of New Jersey with warm summers and cold winters.

The average temperatures in the county seat of Cape May Court House range from a low of 22 °F (−6 °C) in January to a high of 85 °F (29 °C) in July, although a record low of −22 °F (−30 °C) was recorded in January 1942 and a record high of 103 °F (39 °C) was recorded in July 1993. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.91 inches (74 mm) in June to 4.68 inches (119 mm) in August.[13]

Cape May Court House, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3.5
 
42
22
 
 
3.1
 
45
24
 
 
4.5
 
53
30
 
 
4
 
64
39
 
 
3.7
 
73
47
 
 
2.9
 
80
58
 
 
4
 
85
64
 
 
4.7
 
82
62
 
 
4
 
77
54
 
 
3.9
 
66
43
 
 
3.6
 
57
34
 
 
3.4
 
46
26
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[13]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,571
1800 3,066 19.3%
1810 3,632 18.5%
1820 4,265 17.4%
1830 4,936 15.7%
1840 5,324 7.9%
1850 6,433 20.8%
1860 7,130 10.8%
1870 8,349 17.1%
1880 9,765 17.0%
1890 11,268 15.4%
1900 13,201 17.2%
1910 19,745 49.6%
1920 19,460 −1.4%
1930 29,486 51.5%
1940 28,919 −1.9%
1950 37,131 28.4%
1960 48,555 30.8%
1970 59,554 22.7%
1980 82,266 38.1%
1990 95,089 15.6%
2000 102,326 7.6%
2010 97,265 −4.9%
Est. 2012 96,304 [14][15] −1.0%
Historical sources: 1790-1990[16]
1970-2010[5] 2000[3] 2010[2]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 97,265 people, 40,812 households, and 25,956 families residing in the county. The population density was 386.9 per square mile (149.4 /km2). There were 98,309 housing units at an average density of 391 per square mile (151 /km2). The racial makeup of the county was 89.83% (87,369) White, 4.69% (4,565) Black or African American, 0.21% (205) Native American, 0.86% (834) Asian, 0.04% (36) Pacific Islander, 2.47% (2,399) from other races, and 1.91% (1,857) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.22% (6,054) of the population.[2]

There were 40,812 households, of which 21.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 11% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.4% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 15.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.89.[2]

In the county, 18.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 8% from 18 to 24, 20.1% from 25 to 44, 31.6% from 45 to 64, and 21.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.1 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.[2]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 102,326 people in 27,354 families and 42,148 households residing in the county. The population density was 401 people per square mile (155/km²). There were 91,047 housing units at an average density of 357 per square mile (138/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 91.57% White, 5.06% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.35% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. 3.30% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[3][18] Among those residents listing their ancestry, 28.2% were Irish, 21.7% German, 17.1% Italian, 13.2% English, 5.2% Polish and 4.9% American ancestry.[18][19]

There were 42,148 households out of which 26.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.50% were married couples living together, 10.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.10% were non-families. 30.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.94.[3]

In the county, the population age structure was spread out, with 22.3% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 20.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.[3]

The median income for a household in the county was $41,591, and the median income for a family was $51,402. Males had a median income of $39,340 versus $27,621 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,172. About 6.4% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.7% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.[18][20]

Government[edit]

Cape May County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members elected at large in partisan elections to serve staggered three-year terms in office. As of 2013, Cape May County's freeholders (all Republicans) are:[6][21]

  • Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton - Director of Administration, Revenue & Finance and Emergency Management (term expires December 31, 2013, resident of Cape May Court House in Middle Township)[22]
  • Freeholder Vice-Director Leonard C. Desiderio - Director of Public Safety (2015, Sea Isle City)[23]
  • Freehholder Kristine Gabor - Director of Health and Human Services (2014, Upper Township)[24]
  • Freehholder E. Marie Hayes - Director of Tourism and Public Offices (2013, Ocean City; took office in February 2013, serving the unexpired term of M. Susan Sheppard)[25]
  • Freehholder Will Morey - Director of Planning, Economic Development, Education and Transportation Infrastructure (2014, Wildwood Crest)[26]

Cape May County is also served by three Constitutional Officers, County Clerk Rita Marie Fulginiti (R, 2013, Ocean City),[27] Sheriff Gary G. Schafer (R, 2014, Cape May Court House / Middle Township),[28] Surrogate M. Susan Sheppard (R, 2017, Ocean City).[6][29]

The 2nd Congressional District covers all of Cape May County.[30][31] New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[32]

The county is part of the 1st District in the New Jersey Legislature.[33]

Politics[edit]

Though New Jersey is generally a blue state, Cape May County is a red county. In the 2008 U.S. Presidential election, John McCain carried the county by an 8.6% margin over Barack Obama, with Obama winning statewide by 15.5% over McCain.[34] The county lies entirely within the 1st Legislative District,[35] which is represented for the 2012-2013 Session by State Senator Jeff Van Drew and Assemblymen Nelson T. Albano and Bob Andrzejczak, all Democrats.[36]

Industry[edit]

The majority of Cape May County's industry is tourism, due to its beaches and location between the Delaware Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer season (which traditionally ranges from Memorial Day to Labor Day), tourists often outnumber "locals" 9 to 1. As of 2010, the tourism industry in the county is worth $5 billion. As of that year, the largest markets for tourism in Cape May County are Greater Philadelphia, North Jersey, New York, and the Canadian province of Quebec.[37]

Canadian tourists typically visit Cape May County over the summer. In 1991 Canadian tourism into Cape May County remained strong despite an economic recession occurring in Canada.[38] As of 1993, most Canadian tourists to the county were Francophones, who typically began their visits during the final two weeks of the month of July, when many Canadians working in the construction and garment sectors received two-week paid time off around that period.[39] Cape May County established a tourism office in Montreal, along St. Catherine's Street.[40] It was the sole international branch of the county tourism authority.[41] Around 1995, it closed due to budget cuts. By 2010 the tourism office of Cape May County established a French language coupon booklet.[42] In 2009, the tourism director of Cape May County, Diane Wieland, said that the Canadian market remained strong despite the Great Recession.[41] In 2010 Wieland said that 13% of visitors to the New Jersey cape originate from Quebec. Mark Di Ionno of The Star-Ledger concluded that out of the $5 billion the county tourism industry is worth, "basic math says French Canadians spend about $650 million."[37]

The commercial fishing industry is also important in Cape May County. In 2005, Cape May County ranked fifth nationally in commercial fishing landings, generating $68.1 million. By 2009, the total value of the catch landed at Cape May was $73.7 million paid to fishermen, with a market value over $440 million, good enough to be the fourth-most-valuable fishing port in the United States. The 2007 harvest was the largest in over 30 years, with more than three quarters of the value coming from scallops, which have increased in value based on federal fishing restrictions intended to allow stocks to recover.[43]

Municipalities[edit]

The following municipalities are located in Cape May County. The municipality type is listed in parentheses after the name, except where the type is included as part of the name. Census-designated places and other unincorporated communities are listed under their municipalities.

Index map of Cape May County Municipalities (click to see index key)

Education[edit]

Atlantic Cape Community College, founded in 1964 with campuses in Mays Landing and Cape May Court House, serves students from both Atlantic County and Cape May County.[44] Rutgers University has a partnership with Atlantic Cape Community College which offers Bachelor degree completion programs at Atlantic Cape's Mays Landing campus.[45]

Wineries[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cape May County, NJ, National Association of Counties. Accessed January 20, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d e f DP1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 21, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000; Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 21, 2013.
  4. ^ NJ Labor Market Views, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, March 15, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  5. ^ a b New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, p. 6, CPH-2-32. United States Census Bureau, August 2012, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 31, 2013. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c The 2013 Official 2013 Cape May County Directory, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  7. ^ May 2012 Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Definitions, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Accessed May 29, 2013.
  8. ^ Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas, Office of Management and Budget, February 28, 2013. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  9. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  10. ^ New Jersey County High Points, Peakbagger.com. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  11. ^ Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Counties, United States Census Bureau, Backed up by the Internet Archive as of June 11, 2012. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  12. ^ Levin, Eric. "Happy HarvestsIn October, the Garden State’s food and wine festivals invite you to put your month where your mouth is.", New Jersey Monthly, September 14, 2009. Accessed October 3, 2013. "Back when as many as 5,000 acres of rural Cape May County were planted in lima beans, West Cape May billed itself as the lima bean capital of the world, or at least of the country.... The bounty gave rise to an annual Lima Bean Festival, complete with lima bean cookoff and lima bean king and queen."
  13. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Cape May Court House, New Jersey". The Weather Channel. Retrieved October 13, 2012. 
  14. ^ PEPANNRES: Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  15. ^ State & County QuickFacts for Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  16. ^ Forstall, Richard L. Population of states and counties of the United States: 1790 to 1990 from the Twenty-one Decennial Censuses, pp. 108-109. United States Census Bureau, March 1996. ISBN 9780934213486. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  17. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ a b c Tables DP-1 to DP-4 from Census 2000 for Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 18, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  19. ^ DP-2 - Profile of Selected Social Characteristics: 2000 from the Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  20. ^ DP-3 - Profile of Selected Economic Characteristics: 2000 from Census 2000 Summary File 3 (SF 3) - Sample Data for Cape May County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  21. ^ Cape May County Freeholders Home Page, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  22. ^ Gerald M. Thornton, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  23. ^ Leonard C. Desiderio, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  24. ^ Kristine Gabor, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  25. ^ E. Marie Hayes, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  26. ^ Will Morey, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  27. ^ Clerk's Office, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  28. ^ Office of the County Sheriff, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  29. ^ Meet the Surrogate, Cape May County, New Jersey. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  30. ^ 2012 Congressional Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  31. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2011. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  32. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  33. ^ 2011 Legislative Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  34. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results
  35. ^ 2011 Legislative Districts by County, New Jersey Department of State, Division of Elections, June 2011. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  36. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed July 18, 2013.
  37. ^ a b Di Ionni, Mark. "Canadian tourists continue to flock to Wildwoods as vacation destination."New Jersey Star-Ledger. August 3, 2010. Retrieved on August 14, 2013.
  38. ^ Barlas, Thomas. CANADIANS VISITING CAPE DESPITE ECONOMY." Press of Atlantic City, July 24, 1991. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  39. ^ Barlas, Thomas. "Canadian Invasion Spreading / Visitors From Ontario Seeking Info About Cape May, O.C. Vacations", The Press of Atlantic City, July 18, 1993. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  40. ^ Lapusheski, Christine. "Canadian Connection Seeks Warm Reception / New Tourism Head Busy Touting Cape", The Press of Atlantic City, February 28, 1990. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  41. ^ a b Gilfillian, Trudi. "Canadians invade, to county's delight / Cape May County enjoys influx of tourists", The Press of Atlantic City, August 18, 2009. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  42. ^ Staff. "Cape May, N.J., targets Canadian tourists", USA Today, February 9, 2010. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  43. ^ Degener, Richard. "Port of Cape May reels in $73.7M., climbs to fourth in nation", The Press of Atlantic City, July 26, 2009. Accessed October 3, 2013. "Scallop harvests, boosted by federal regulations that close off huge sections of the ocean to let them grow big and plump, helped the port, which includes docks in Lower Township and Wildwood but none actually in Cape May, move from the eighth largest in the country in 2007 to No. 4 in the nation last year."
  44. ^ History, Atlantic Cape Community College. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  45. ^ Atlantic CapeThe power of Rutgers, locally, Rutgers Off Campus - Atlantic Cape. Accessed October 2, 2013.
  46. ^ Dorwart, Jeffrey M. (1992). Cape May County, New Jersey: the Making of an American Resort Community. Rutgers University Press. p. 83. ISBN 0-8135-1784-2. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°05′N 74°52′W / 39.08°N 74.86°W / 39.08; -74.86