Oceanport, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Oceanport, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Oceanport
Map of Oceanport in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Oceanport in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Oceanport, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Oceanport, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°18′58″N 74°01′14″W / 40.316012°N 74.020479°W / 40.316012; -74.020479Coordinates: 40°18′58″N 74°01′14″W / 40.316012°N 74.020479°W / 40.316012; -74.020479[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated May 11, 1920
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Michael Mahon (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Kimberly A. Jungfer[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 3.798 sq mi (9.838 km2)
 • Land 3.180 sq mi (8.237 km2)
 • Water 0.618 sq mi (1.600 km2)  16.27%
Area rank 305th of 566 in state
21st of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 5,832
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 5,816
 • Rank 353rd of 566 in state
30th of 53 in county[11]
 • Density 1,833.7/sq mi (708.0/km2)
 • Density rank 303rd of 566 in state
37th of 53 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07757[12][13]
Area code(s) 732[14]
FIPS code 3402554570[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885334[1][17]
Website oceanportboro.com

Oceanport is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,832,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 25 (+0.4%) from the 5,807 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 339 (-5.5%) from the 6,146 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Oceanport was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 6, 1920, from portions of Eatontown Township (now Eatontown), based on the results of a referendum held on May 11, 1920.[19]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Oceanport as its 4th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[20]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.798 square miles (9.838 km2), of which, 3.180 square miles (8.237 km2) of it was land and 0.618 square miles (1.600 km2) of it (16.27%) of it was water.[1][2]

The borough borders Little Silver to the northwest, Long Branch to the east, Eatontown to the southwest, and West Long Branch to the southeast. It also shares a water border to the northeast with Monmouth Beach and forms a peninsula, jutting into the Shrewsbury River.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,872
1940 3,159 68.8%
1950 7,588 140.2%
1960 4,937 −34.9%
1970 7,503 52.0%
1980 5,888 −21.5%
1990 6,146 4.4%
2000 5,807 −5.5%
2010 5,832 0.4%
Est. 2013 5,816 [10][21] −0.3%
Population sources:1930[22]
1930-1990[23] 2000[24][25] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,832 people, 2,227 households, and 1,597 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,833.7 per square mile (708.0/km2). There were 2,390 housing units at an average density of 751.5 per square mile (290.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.36% (5,445) White, 3.00% (175) Black or African American, 0.05% (3) Native American, 1.59% (93) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.67% (39) from other races, and 1.32% (77) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.05% (236) of the population.[7]

There were 2,227 households, of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.7% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.3% were non-families. 24.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.12.[7]

In the borough, 23.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.4 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $89,208 (with a margin of error of +/- $18,245) and the median family income was $108,958 (+/- $21,795). Males had a median income of $60,038 (+/- $12,383) versus $49,415 (+/- $5,095) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $52,252 (+/- $9,172). About 3.1% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.2% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[26]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 5,807 people, 2,043 households, and 1,554 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,802.1 people per square mile (696.3/km2). There were 2,114 housing units at an average density of 656.0 per square mile (253.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.71% White, 1.96% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.79% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.55% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.07% of the population.[24][25]

There were 2,043 households out of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.0% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.9% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.18.[24][25]

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 98.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.[24][25]

The median income for a household in the borough was $71,458, and the median income for a family was $85,038. Males had a median income of $57,955 versus $39,718 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,356. About 1.8% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[24][25]

Telephone service[edit]

The community is in area codes 732 and 848 for landlines, Oceanport is served by the 222, 389, 229, 544 and 542 exchanges . Mobile service is through area codes 732/848 and area code 908.[14]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Oceanport is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Oceanport, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[27][28]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Oceanport Borough is Republican Michael J. Mahon, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[29] Members of the Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chairmanship in parentheses) are Council President Ellynn M. Kahle (R, 2014; Health and Human Services), Jerry R. Bertekap (2015; Parks and Recreation), Richard A. Gallo (2014; Public Works), Joseph A. Irace (R, 2016; Public Safety), Robert D. Lynch (R, 2016; Finance and Administration) and Christopher Paglia (R, 2015 - serving an unexpired term; Planning and Development).[30][31][32][33][34]

Christopher Paglia was selected by the borough council from among three candidates offered by the Republican committee and appointed in November 2013 to fill the vacant seat of William Johnson, who had resigned to take a position with Monmouth County.[35]

Oceanport is a participating municipality in an initiative to study regionalization of their municipal police force with one or more municipalities. The borough received a grant from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs in the amount of $40,950 along with the Boroughs of Fair Haven, Little Silver, Shrewsbury and Rumson to hire professional consultants to conduct the study on their behalf. A report delivered in July 2008 recommended that Fair Haven, Little Silver and Rumson should consider a network of shared police services, with consideration of inclusion of Oceanport and Shrewsbury deferred to a second phase.[36]

Federal, State and County Representation[edit]

Oceanport is located in the 6th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[8][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Oceanport had been in the 12th state legislative district.[40] Prior to the 2010 Census, Oceanport had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[40]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[44][45]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 13th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph M. Kyrillos (R, Middletown Township) and in the General Assembly by Amy Handlin (R, Middletown Township) and Declan O'Scanlon (R, Little Silver).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[49] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[50] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[51] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[52] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[53] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[54][55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[56] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[57] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,331 registered voters in Oceanport, of which 990 (22.9%) were registered as Democrats, 1,219 (28.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,122 (49.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 56.9% of the vote here (1,982 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.4% (1,408 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (40 votes), among the 3,481 ballots cast by the borough's 4,475 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.8%.[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.5% of the vote here (2,078 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 38.3% (1,316 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (28 votes), among the 3,433 ballots cast by the borough's 4,317 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 79.5.[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.9% of the vote here (1,615 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 26.2% (641 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.5% (159 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (17 votes), among the 2,450 ballots cast by the borough's 4,401 registered voters, yielding a 55.7% turnout.[62]

Education[edit]

Students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade in public school are educated by the Oceanport School District, which also serves students from Sea Bright, non-operating school district.[63] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 649 students and 54.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.93:1.[64] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Wolf Hill Elementary School[66] with 364 students in pre-Kindergarten through 4th grade and Maple Place Middle School[67] with 285 students in grades 5 - 8.[68][69]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Shore Regional High School, a regional high school that serves students from the constituent districts of Monmouth Beach, Oceanport, Sea Bright and West Long Branch.[70][71] The high school is located in West Long Branch and is part of the Shore Regional High School District.

Monmouth Park[edit]

The famed Monmouth Park, a thoroughbred horse race track, is home to the annual Haskell Invitational Handicap. The choice to put the track in this small community in 1946 was made because of its prime location at the shore and its accessibility for New Yorkers and North Jersey folk who make up the majority of the track crowd.[72] The Haskell Invitational Stakes, which next to the Triple Crown is horse racing's biggest event, takes place each year in August. In October 2007, Oceanport's Monmouth Park hosted the Breeders' Cup, attracting nearly 70,000 fans over the two days of the event.[73] Monmouth Park implemented a stormwater collection system in 2010, after the track had been repeatedly fined by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection for polluting the Branchport Creek section of the Shrewsbury River with fecal contamination that washed off from the areas surrounding the track after rainstorms.[74] As of Summer 2014, parts of the Shrewsbury River in Oceanport remain posted by the Monmouth County Health Department with "Polluted Water - Avoid Contact" signs due to continued release of horse waste by Monmouth Park Racetrack.

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, Oceanport had a total of 31.26 miles (50.31 km) of roadways, of which 25.47 miles (40.99 km) were maintained by the borough, 5.46 miles (8.79 km) by Monmouth County and 0.33 miles (0.53 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[75]

Route 71[76] and County Route 33 pass through Oceanport.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit has a nearby limited-service stop at the Monmouth Park station[77] for Monmouth Park Racetrack, offering seasonal service from May through October[78] on the North Jersey Coast Line.[79] NJ Transit local bus service is provided on the 831 route.[80]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Oceanport include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Oceanport. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Oceanport, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Oceanport borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Oceanport borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Oceanport, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ a b Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Oceanport, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 184. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  20. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  21. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  22. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  23. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Oceanport borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Oceanport borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  26. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Oceanport borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  27. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  28. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  29. ^ A Message from Our Mayor, Borough of Oceanport. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  30. ^ Our Council, Borough of Oceanport. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  31. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Oceanport. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  32. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 5, 2013, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  33. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  34. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 21, 2013.
  35. ^ Walter, Kenny. "New councilman appointed in Oceanport ", The Hub, December 5, 2013. Accessed November 2, 2014. "The Borough Council has appointed Christopher Paglia as the newest council member, replacing William Johnson... Johnson resigned from the council on Nov. 1 after taking a position as the Monmouth County recycling coordinator."
  36. ^ O'Donnell, Jenna. "Study recommends towns share police services; Consultants: Law enforcement can be regionalized", the hub, July 17, 2008. Accessed July 31, 2012. "A feasibility study of shared police services among Rumson, Fair Haven and Little Silver suggests that the three towns pool resources in six areas, including criminal investigation and communications.The findings of the Two River Regional Police Study Group by Eatontown-based Patriot Consulting Group were presented to officials and residents of the three boroughs during a meeting held at Little Silver Borough Hall on July 9.... The group was founded by the elected officials of the three towns, along with the boroughs of Oceanport and Shrewsbury, in 2007 for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of sharing and possibly regionalizing their five municipal police departments into on regional department, the release states.... O'Scanlon, a Little Silver councilman at the time, said then that the study would proceed with only Little Silver, Fair Haven and Rumson, but that Oceanport and Shrewsbury might join at a later date. "
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  59. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  60. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  61. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  62. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  63. ^ Letter to Sea Bright Borough School District, New Jersey Department of Education, dated June 30, 2009. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  64. ^ District information for Oceanport School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  65. ^ School Data for the Oceanport School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 2, 2014.
  66. ^ Wolf Hill Elementary School, Oceanport School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  67. ^ Maple Place Middle School, Oceanport School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  68. ^ Schools, Oceanport School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  69. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Oceanport School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  70. ^ Shore Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 2, 2014. "Shore Regional High School, located in West Long Branch, Monmouth County New Jersey, is a comprehensive secondary school that proudly serves the communities of Monmouth Beach, Oceanport, Sea Bright, and West Long Branch. The beautiful ten-acre campus is situated on the banks of Franklin Lake in the borough of West Long Branch."
  71. ^ Walter, Kenny. "SRHS $15.7M budget calls for flat tax levy; School taxes decrease for three of four sending towns", The Hub, April 4, 2013. Accessed November 2, 2014. "Three of the four sending districts that comprise the Shore Regional High School District — Oceanport, Monmouth Beach and West Long Branch — will pay less in taxes for the 2013-14 school year. Taxes will increase, however, for property owners in Sea Bright, which will pay a higher percentage of the regional school budget."
  72. ^ About Monmouth Park, Monmouth Park Racetrack. Accessed December 6, 2012. "On June 19, 1946, for the third time and after a 53-year hiatus, Monmouth Park reopened its doors."
  73. ^ Leach, Kyle C. "Monmouth loses bid to host 2013 Breeders Cup", The Star-Ledger, July 27, 2012. Accessed December 6, 2012. "Monmouth was the site of the 2007 Breeders’ Cup, which despite prolonged rain that produced a muddy track, drew 69,584 fans over two days — the first time the Breeders’ Cup was expanded to a two-day event."
  74. ^ Spoto, MaryAnn. "Monmouth Park Racetrack to end stormwater pollution problem with new water collection system", The Star-Ledger, May 21, 2010. Accessed December 6, 2012 "When Monmouth Park opens its season Saturday, the racetrack in Oceanport will have the beginnings of a new stormwater collection system to prevent fecal contamination in the nearby Branchport Creek. The state Department of Environmental Protection said Thursday it had finalized an agreement with the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority to end a pollution problem that has plagued the waterway for decades."
  75. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  76. ^ Route 71 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  77. ^ Monmouth Park station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  78. ^ "Monmouth Park Station: Service to Monmouth Park Resumes through October 6, 2013", New Jersey Transit press release, May 9, 2013. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  79. ^ North Jersey Coast Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  80. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  81. ^ Campaign 2004 Candidate Profile: Philip Bredesen, USA Today. Accessed November 27, 2007.
  82. ^ Staff. "Oceanport judge nominated to board by governor", The Hub, July 25, 2003. Accessed September 30, 2013. "Judge John D’Amico Jr., Oceanport, was recently nominated by Gov. James. E. McGreevey to become chairman of the state Parole Board. The appointment is subject to the advice and consent of the state Senate. "
  83. ^ Via Associated Press. "Faxon leads American charge", The Beaver County Times, July 21, 1995. Accessed September 30, 2013. "The 34 year-old from Oceanport, New Jersey played the difficult holes well, including the infamous No. 17 Road Hole where he negotiated the 461 yards to the green with a well-played iron and almost holed his 20-foot birdie try."
  84. ^ Byrnes, Amy. "Oceanport's Harry Flaherty Signs With Dallas Cowboys; The RBC grad signed earlier this week, according to a report on ESPN.com.", LittleSilver-OceanportPatch, August 17, 2012. Accessed September 30, 2013. "Oceanport's Harry Flaherty, who graduated from Red Bank Catholic High School in 2007, signed with the Dallas Cowboys earlier this week, according to a report on ESPN.com."
  85. ^ "Lewis Hansen, 74, Jersey Politician". The New York Times, November 19, 1965. Accessed September 30, 2013. "He failed to recover from surgery he underwent Oct. 10. He had returned herre in July from his residence in Oceanport, N. J."
  86. ^ Jennifer Nittoso Biography, The Weather Channel.
  87. ^ Horowitz, Jason. "Gov. Paterson's Main Man: Former Jesuit, 'Natural' Politician Charles O'Byrne", The New York Observer, March 15, 2008. Accessed April 3, 2008. "Mr. O'Byrne, 48, spent his first years in Manhattan and Staten Island before moving to Oceanport in New Jersey at the age of five. He attended Red Bank high School, off the Navesink River on the Jersey Shore, and after graduating in 1977, he attended Columbia University, earning his degree in 1981."
  88. ^ Mansnerus, Laura. "Charles Rembar, 85, Dies; Lawyer Fought Censorship", The New York Times, October 26, 2000. Accessed September 30, 2013. "Mr. Rembar was born March 12, 1915, in Oceanport, N.J., and grew up in Long Branch, N.J., where his parents ran a hotel in the summer and a cattle farm in the winter."
  89. ^ Staff. "Kevin Smith, the sequel", Asbury Park Press, July 18, 1999. Accessed June 22, 2011. "Born at 4:57 p.m., Harley Quinn weighed 7 pounds and 8 ounces and will reside with her parents in their new home in Oceanport."
  90. ^ Staff. "Bikini Barbers: A Unique Business Model", Word on the Shore, March 17, 2012. Accessed September 30, 2013. "Mr. Wulkan is a Jersey boy, originally from Oceanport."

External links[edit]

Official website