Office of Population Affairs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Office of Population Affairs (OPA), a part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services within the Office of Public Health and Science, serves as the focal point to advise the Secretary and the Assistant Secretary for Health on a wide range of reproductive health topics, including adolescent pregnancy, family planning,[1] and sterilization, as well as other population issues. Created by an Act of Congress in 1970 (Public Law 91-572, 84 Stat. 1504, Dec. 24. 1970), the Office of Population Affairs, under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Population Affairs (DASPA), has three component offices responsible for the oversight of program functions: Office of Family Planning, Office of Adolescent Pregnancy Programs, and Office of Research and Evaluation.

Office of Family Planning[edit]

The Title X Family Planning program "Population Research and Voluntary Family Planning Programs" (Pub.L. 91–572), was enacted in 1970 as Title X of the Public Health Service Act. Title X is the only federal grant program dedicated solely to providing individuals with comprehensive family planning and related preventive health services. The Title X program is designed to provide access to contraceptive services, supplies and information to all who want and need them. By law, priority is given to persons from low-income families.

The Title X Family Planning program is administered within the Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Population Affairs (OPA) by the Office of Family Planning (OFP). In fiscal year 2008, Congress appropriated approximately $299 million for family planning activities supported under Title X. At least 90 percent of the appropriation is used for clinical family planning services as described in the statute and regulations (45 CFR Part 59).

In fiscal year 2008, 88 Title X grantees provided family planning services to approximately five million women and men through a network of more than 4,400 community-based clinics that include State and local health departments, tribal organizations, hospitals, university health centers, independent clinics, community health centers, faith-based organizations, and other public and private nonprofit agencies. In approximately 75% of U.S. counties, there is at least one clinic that receives Title X funds and provides services as required under the Title X statute.

Since inception, Title X family planning clinics have played a critical role in ensuring access to a broad range of family planning and related preventive health services for millions of low-income or uninsured individuals and others. In addition to contraceptive services and related counseling, Title X-supported clinics provide a number of related preventive health services such as: patient education and counseling; breast and pelvic examinations; breast and cervical cancer screening according to nationally recognized standards of care; sexually transmitted disease (STD) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention education, counseling, testing and referral; and pregnancy diagnosis and counseling. By law, Title X funds may not be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning.

The Title X program also supports three key functions, authorized under the Title X statute aimed at improving the quality of family planning services and assisting clinics with responding to client needs. These functions include: (1) training for family planning clinic personnel through ten regional general training programs and three national training programs that focus on clinical training, enhancing quality family planning services for males, and/or coordination of training activities on the national level; (2) data collection and family planning research aimed at improving the delivery of family planning services; and, (3) information dissemination and community based education and outreach activities. These functions help to ensure that family planning services are evidence-based and of high quality. The Title X family planning program is intended to assist individuals in determining the number and spacing of their children. This promotes positive birth outcomes and healthy families. The education, counseling, and medical services available in Title X-funded clinic settings assist couples in achieving these goals.


Research and Evaluation[edit]

Within the Office of Population Affairs (OPA), the Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) oversees research and evaluation activities supported by the Title X Family Planning program and the Title XX Adolescent Family Life program. Each program has legislative authority to conduct research; program implementation and related research in the case of Title X and research on the causes and consequences of adolescent premarital sexual relations and pregnancy in the case of Title XX. The Title XX statute also requires an independent evaluation of all funded demonstration projects and these evaluations are overseen by ORE staff, as are other research and evaluation activities undertaken by OPA in collaboration with other Federal agencies.

Budget[edit]

Family Planning Program In fiscal year 2008, Congress appropriated approximately $299 million for family planning activities supported under Title X. At least 90 percent of the appropriation is used for clinical family planning services as described in the statute and regulations (45 CFR Part 59).

Adolescent Family Life Program In fiscal year 2008, Congress appropriated $29.8 million for the program. To view the 2008 HHS Budget plan, please visit [1]. For additional HHS budget information, please visit the HHS Office of Budget.

References[edit]

External links[edit]