Ogden Hoffman

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Ogden Hoffman

Ogden Hoffman (October 13, 1794 – May 1, 1856) was an American lawyer and politician.

Life[edit]

Hoffman was born on October 13, 1794, the son of New York Attorney General Josiah Ogden Hoffman (1766–1837) and Mary (Colden) Hoffman. He pursued classical studies and graduated from Columbia College in 1812. He served for three years in the Navy and was warranted a midshipman in 1814.

He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1818, and commenced practice in Goshen, New York. On June 27, 1819, he married Emily Burrall, and they had two children, among them Federal Judge in California Ogden Hoffman, Jr. (1822–1891). He was District Attorney of Orange County from May 1823 to January 1826; and a member of the New York State Assembly (Orange Co.) in 1826. Then he returned to New York City and there practiced law in partnership with Hugh Maxwell, at the time D.A. of New York County.

Hoffman was again a member of the State Assembly (New York Co.) in 1828; and was D.A. of New York County from 1829 to 1835. After the removal of the federal deposits from the Second Bank of the United States in 1833, he abandoned Tammany Hall and the Democratic Party, and joined the Whigs. In 1836, Hoffman defended Richard P. Robinson at his trial for the murder of Helen Jewett, and got his client acquitted. In November 1838, he married Virginia Southard (died 1886), and they had three children.

Hoffman was elected as a Whig to the 25th and 26th United States Congresses, holding office from March 4, 1837, to March 3, 1841. He was United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York from 1841 to 1845; and was New York Attorney General from 1854 to 1855, elected on the Whig ticket at the New York state election, 1853.

He died on May 1, 1856, at his home at Ninth Street in New York City, of "congestion of the lungs", and was buried in the St. Mark's Church vault. His son in the newly admitted state of California.

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Hugh Maxwell
New York County District Attorney
1829–1835
Succeeded by
Thomas Phoenix
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Churchill C. Cambreleng,
Gideon Lee,
Ely Moore,
John McKeon
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd congressional district

1837–1841
with Churchill C. Cambreleng 1837–39, Ely Moore 1837–39, Edward Curtis 1837–41, James Monroe 1839–41 and Moses H. Grinnell 1839–41
Succeeded by
Charles G. Ferris,
Fernando Wood,
James I. Roosevelt,
John McKeon
Legal offices
Preceded by
Benjamin F. Butler
U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York
1841–1845
Succeeded by
Benjamin F. Butler
Preceded by
Gardner Stow
New York Attorney General
1854–1855
Succeeded by
Stephen B. Cushing