Oh Lonesome Me

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For the Don Gibson album, see Oh Lonesome Me (album).
"Oh Lonesome Me"
Single by Don Gibson
from the album Oh Lonesome Me
B-side "I Can't Stop Loving You"
Released December 1957
Format 7" single
Genre Country
Length 2:26
Label RCA Victor 7133
Writer(s) Don Gibson
Producer(s) Chet Atkins
Don Gibson singles chronology
"Sweet Dreams"
(1956)
"Oh Lonesome Me"
(1958)
"Blue Blue Day"
(1958)
"Oh Lonesome Me"
Single by The Kentucky Headhunters
from the album Pickin' on Nashville
B-side "My Daddy Was a Milkman"
Released 1990
Format 7" single
Genre Country/Southern rock
Length 3:12
Label Mercury 450-7
Producer(s) The Kentucky Headhunters
The Kentucky Headhunters singles chronology
"Dumas Walker"
(1990)
"Oh Lonesome Me"
(1990)
"Rock 'n' Roll Angel"
(1990)

"Oh Lonesome Me" is a popular song written and recorded in December 1957 by Don Gibson with Chet Atkins[1] producing for RCA Victor in Nashville. Released in 1958, the song topped the country chart for eight non-consecutive weeks in addition to reaching No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2] Its B-side was "I Can't Stop Loving You", which peaked at #7 on the C&W Jockey charts and became a standard song about unrequited love.[3] The vocal backing on both songs were provided by the Jordanaires.

The Kentucky Headhunters version[edit]

The song was covered by The Kentucky Headhunters in 1990. Their version went to number 8, which was the band's highest-peaking single.[4]

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1990) Peak
position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[5] 19
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[6] 8

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1990) Position
US Country Songs (Billboard)[7] 73

Cover versions[edit]

Several other artists have covered the song for their albums as a "filler" or "album cut". A group of child singers who record under the name The Countdown Kids covered the song for a children's country music CD, which sounds very similar to Gibson's original recording.

Former The Brady Bunch child star Maureen McCormick performed the song in the Barbara Mandrell TV biopic Get To The Heart: The Barbara Mandrell Story.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gilliland, John (1969). "Show 10 - Tennessee Firebird: American country music before and after Elvis. [Part 2]" (audio). Pop Chronicles. Digital.library.unt.edu. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 157. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  3. ^ Gillett, Charlie (1996). The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll ((2nd Ed.) ed.). New York, N.Y.: Da Capo Press. pp. 108–109. ISBN 0-306-80683-5. 
  4. ^ Whitburn, p. 223
  5. ^ "Top RPM Country Tracks: Issue 7997." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. August 18, 1990. Retrieved August 23, 2013.
  6. ^ "The Kentucky Headhunters Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for The Kentucky Headhunters.
  7. ^ "Best of 1990: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1990. Retrieved August 23, 2013. 
  8. ^ Whitburn, p. 84
  9. ^ Chart Stats - Images - Singles - 3279.jpg
  10. ^ Chart Stats - Craig Douglas - Og Lonesome Me
  11. ^ Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music Volume Two
  12. ^ Trío Los Panchos, Letras Retrieved March 17, 2012.
  13. ^ Whitburn, p. 203
  14. ^ We Five, Catch the Wind Retrieved March 2, 2012.
  15. ^ Whitburn, p. 243

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Ballad of a Teenage Queen" by Johnny Cash
C&W Best Sellers in Stores
number one single

April 14, 1958 - May 26, 1958
June 16, 1958
Succeeded by
"All I Have to Do Is Dream" by The Everly Brothers
"Guess Things Happen That Way" by Johnny Cash
Preceded by
"Gone"
by Ferlin Husky
Billboard C&W Best Sellers in Stores
number-one single of the year

1958
Succeeded by
"The Battle of New Orleans"
by Johnny Horton