Ohio State School for the Blind

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Ohio State School for the Blind
Address
5220 North High Street
Columbus, Ohio, (Franklin County), 43214
United States
Coordinates 40°4′9″N 83°0′43″W / 40.06917°N 83.01194°W / 40.06917; -83.01194Coordinates: 40°4′9″N 83°0′43″W / 40.06917°N 83.01194°W / 40.06917; -83.01194
Information
Type Public, Coeducational high school
Established 1837
Superintendent Cynthia Johnson[1]
Principal Deborah Durham-Miller[1]
Grades 9-12
Color(s) Red and Blue [1]         
Athletics conference North Central Association of Schools for the Blind[1]
Team name Panthers[1][2]
Accreditation North Central Association of Colleges and Schools [3]
Athletic Director Jim Peterfish[1]
Website

Ohio State School for the Blind is a school located in Columbus, Ohio, United States. It is run by the Ohio Department of Education for blind and visually impaired students across Ohio. It was established in 1837, making it the nation's first public school for the visually impaired.

The Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind was originally constructed in 1837 in downtown Columbus on Parsons Ave, it once was the headquarters for the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Now the original location is home to the Columbus Public Health offices. In the early 1900s, the Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind became known as the Ohio State School for the Blind.[4] In the mid-1950s the school moved to its current location at 5220 N. High St on the ground of a defaulted golf course. Over its history, the school has seen a vast change in its population and demographics, originally housing a majority of single disability student to now handling almost 75% multi-handicapped people.

In the basement of the school sits a vast collection of models that were constructed and purchased over time, these models are of various monuments around the United States that blind students may not be able to see with their eyes but instead could examine with their hands. While the majority of the models were constructed of quality material, there are some that have been neglected and damaged over the years.

In recent years, a discussion has gained popularity about combining the school with the Ohio School for the Deaf, creating a single state funded school for both blind and deaf students.[5] Camps from both sides have argued both for and against this idea. Opponents say it will destroy each other's way of life. After several months of research, the state of Ohio decided to keep the Ohio State School for the Blind and the Ohio State School for the Deaf each on their own campus. They will each move into new school buildings on the existing grounds in 2011.

The Ohio State School for the Blind marching band was formed in 2005 to provide music and half-time shows for the Ohio School for the Deaf football program and is the only blind marching band in the country. The Ohio State School for the Blind will make history on January 1, 2010 when they will march in the 2010 Tournament of Roses Parade in California. The group will be the first blind marching band in the event's 121-year history.[6] The marching band was awarded with the National Citation of Excellence from national music fraternity, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia [7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f NCASB. "North Central Association of Schools for the Blind website". Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  2. ^ OSSB. "Ohio State School for the Blind website". Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  3. ^ NCA-CASI. "NCA-Council on Accreditation and School Improvement". Retrieved 2010-02-17. [dead link]
  4. ^ Ohio State School for the Blind
  5. ^ "History of the Joint Campus Concept" Ohio State School for the Blind and Ohio School for the Deaf
  6. ^ Gladden, John. "Hear the Beat" AmericanProfile, December 27, 2009 - January 2, 2010, pp 4-7.
  7. ^ "Ohio State School for the Blind receives National Citation". sinfoniaresonance.org. January 3, 2011. Retrieved 2011-01-05. 

External links[edit]