Ohio State Route 444

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State Route 444 marker

State Route 444
Route of SR 444 highlighted in red; former routing is dashed red
Route information
Maintained by ODOT
Length: 8.43 mi[1] (13.57 km)
Existed: 1959 – present
Major junctions
South end: SR 4 in Dayton
North end: I‑675 near Fairborn
Location
Counties: Montgomery, Greene, Clark
Highway system
SR 435 SR 446

State Route 444 (SR 444, Ohio 444) is an 8.43-mile (13.57 km) state route that runs from Dayton through Fairborn in the US state of Ohio. Most of the north–south signed route is an urban four-lane highway which passes through both commercial and residential properties. For some of its path, SR 444 passes through Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The highway was first signed in 1959 on much the same alignment as today. SR 444 replaced the SR 4 designation of the highway, which dated back to 1927. In 1927, SR 4 replaced SR 52, which was established in 1923. The northern terminus was moved to its current location when a section of Interstate 675 (I–675) opened in 1976. In 2012 a section of the road was rerouted away from the base, using city streets in Fairborn.

Route description[edit]

SR 444 begins at an interchange on SR 4, in Montgomery County. The highway heads southeast as a four-lane divided highway, passing through woodland and entering Greene County. The road passes through Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, then curves northeast, having an interchange with SR 844. SR 444 turns southeast crossing a railroad track, before turning northeast again, as a two-lane highway. The highway heads northeast through Fairborn, passing residential properties, before curving due north and becoming a four-lane undivided highway. As the highway heads north it crosses the railroad track again. The route turns due west towards the base, before turning due north. SR 444 begins a concurrency with SR 235, west of downtown Fairborn. The concurrency heads northeast, passing through commercial properties, before SR 235 turns due north. SR 444 continues northeast, passing through commercial properties, before becoming a two-lane highway. As a two-lane highway SR 444 passes through woodland, before having an interchange with I–675. This interchange is the northern terminus of SR 444.[2][3]

SR 444 is designated "Freedom Memorial Highway", in honor of the 52 U.S. hostages held for 444 days during the 1979-1981 Iran hostage crisis and of the eight service members who died during a 1980 rescue attempt.[4]

The entire length of SR 444 is part of the National Highway System, a system of routes important to the nation's economy, mobility and defense.[5][6] The highway is maintained by the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT).

History[edit]

In 1923 the route that became SR 444 was signed as SR 52.[7][8] SR 52 was changed to SR 4 in 1927.[9][10] SR 444 was originally signed in 1959, from its current southern terminus to Interstate 70, at the time it was U.S. Route 40.[11][12] The northern terminus moved to its current position in 1976, when Interstate 675 was completed and signed along the alignment from SR 444’s current northern terminus north to I–70.[13][14] On October 9, 2012, the portion of route through WPAFB was rerouted through Fairborn for security reasons.[15]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Montgomery Dayton 0.00 0.00 SR 4 / Valley Pike – New Carlisle, Dayton Interchange
Greene Bath Township 0.65 1.05 Springfield Street west Interchange, northbound entrance / southbound exit only
Fairborn 3.16 5.09 SR 844 to I‑675 – Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Interchange
5.79 9.32 SR 235 south (Xenia Drive) Southern end of SR 235 concurrency
6.45 10.38 SR 235 north (Central Avenue) Northern end of SR 235 concurrency
GreeneClark
county line
BathMad River
township line
8.09–
8.43
13.02–
13.57
I‑675 to I‑70 / Dayton-Springfield Road – Cincinnati, Columbus Exit 24 (I-675)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ohio Department of Transportation. "Technical Services Straight Line Diagrams". Retrieved April 30, 2010. 
  2. ^ Google Inc. "Overview of Ohio State Route 444". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=OH-444+N&daddr=39.8068617,-84.0298151+to:39.822291,-84.027662+to:Unknown+road&hl=en&sll=39.848155,-83.992882&sspn=0.002426,0.004823&geocode=FQtSXwIdpK78-g%3BFY1nXwIdic79-iktY5pCwp1AiDECslZTg4ClJw%3BFdOjXwId8tb9-imvJcqu8J1AiDE6KFLaa7_tqg%3BFZ4MYAIdElv--g&mra=dme&mrsp=3&sz=18&via=1,2&t=h&z=18. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  3. ^ Ohio Department of Transportation (2011) (PDF). Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOT. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/maps/11MapFiles/Front-11-PDF.pdf. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  4. ^ Ohio Revised Code (July 5, 1982). "5533.56 Freedom memorial highway". Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  5. ^ Federal Highway Administration (December 2003) (PDF). National Highway System: Dayton, Ohio (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/ohio/dayton_oh.pdf. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  6. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike; Adderly, Kevin (September 26, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved February 26, 2013. 
  7. ^ Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works (1922). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOHPW. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  8. ^ Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works (1923). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOHPW. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  9. ^ Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works (1926). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOHPW. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  10. ^ Ohio Department of Highways (1927). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOH. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  11. ^ Ohio Department of Highways (1958). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOH. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  12. ^ Ohio Department of Highways (1959). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOH. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  13. ^ Ohio Department of Transportation (1975). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOT. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  14. ^ Ohio Department of Transportation (1976). Official Ohio Highway Map (Map). Cartography by ODOT. http://www.dot.state.oh.us/Divisions/Planning/TechServ/TIM/Pages/OfficialTransportationMaps.aspx. Retrieved February 26, 2013.
  15. ^ Matthews, Steven (October 10, 2012). "Wright-Patterson closes portion of Ohio 444 for security reasons". Dayton Daily News. Retrieved October 13, 2012. 

External links[edit]