Enniskillen, Ontario

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Oil City, Ontario)
Jump to: navigation, search

[:For the unincorporated namesake community in the municipality of Clarington, see Enniskillen, Ontario (Hamlet).

Enniskillen
Township (lower-tier)
Township of Enniskillen
Oil City
Oil City
Enniskillen is located in Ontario
Enniskillen
Enniskillen
Coordinates: 42°49′N 82°7.5′W / 42.817°N 82.1250°W / 42.817; -82.1250Coordinates: 42°49′N 82°7.5′W / 42.817°N 82.1250°W / 42.817; -82.1250
Country  Canada
Province  Ontario
County Lambton
Settled 1830s
Incorporated 1855
Government
 • Mayor Kevin Marriott
 • Federal riding Sarnia—Lambton
 • Prov. riding Sarnia—Lambton
Area[1]
 • Land 338.18 km2 (130.57 sq mi)
Population (2011)[1]
 • Total 2,930
 • Density 8.7/km2 (23/sq mi)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Postal Code FSA N0N
Area code(s) 519 and 226
Website www.enniskillen.ca

Enniskillen is a township in the Canadian province of Ontario, within Lambton County. It is located at the intersection of Highway 21 (Oil Heritage Road) and Rokeby Line. The economy of the township is based on agriculture. It was named after Sir Galbraith Lowry Cole’s father who was the Earl of Enniskillen, Northern Ireland.

Communities[edit]

The township comprises the communities of Oil City, Glen Rae and Marthaville, and surrounds but does not include the independent municipalities of Petrolia and Oil Springs.

Demographics[edit]

Population trend:[5]

  • Population in 2011: 2930
  • Population in 2006: 3122
  • Population in 2001: 3259
  • Population in 1996: 3288
  • Population in 1991: 3167

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Enniskillen census profile". 2011 Census of Population. Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2012-02-09. 
  2. ^ "2011 Community Profiles". Canada 2011 Census. Statistics Canada. July 5, 2013. Retrieved 2012-02-09. 
  3. ^ "2006 Community Profiles". Canada 2006 Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-22. 
  4. ^ "2001 Community Profiles". Canada 2001 Census. Statistics Canada. February 17, 2012. Retrieved 2011-02-22. 
  5. ^ Statistics Canada: 1996, 2001, 2006 census