Okinawa Prefectural Assembly

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Okinawa Prefectural Assembly
沖縄県議会
Okinawa-kengikai
The Prefectural Assembly Building within the Okinawa Metropolitan Government Building complex in Naha
Type
Type
History
Founded 1909 (1909) in the Empire[1]
1972 (1972) after end of U.S. military rule
Leadership
President (gichō)
Masaharu Kina, Independent
Vice President (fuku-gichō)
Ishō Urasaki, Liberal Democratic Party
Seats 48 assembly members
Elections
Last election
2012

The Okinawa Prefectural Assembly (沖縄県議会 Okinawa-kengikai?) is the prefectural parliament of Okinawa.

Its 48 members are elected every four years in 14 districts by single non-transferable vote (SNTV). 13 electoral districts are multi-member district, one district is a single-member district where SNTV becomes equivalent to First-past-the-post voting.

The assembly is responsible for enacting and amending prefectural ordinances, approving the budget and voting on important administrative appointments made by the governor including the vice-governors.

Unlike most mainland prefectural assemblies (Hokkaidō is another exception) the Okinawa Prefectural Assembly was not in existence continuously since 1878. After the Battle of Okinawa, the United States military governed the prefecture. The civilian branch of the military government was the United States Civil Administration of the Ryukyu Islands; a Legislature of the Government of the Ryukyu Islands (立法院?) was created in 1952. After Okinawa's return to the mainland in 1972, the Prefectural Assembly was restored. Since then, it had been one of three prefectures in the country that do not elect their assemblies in unified local elections (last round: 2011), the other two being Ibaraki and Tokyo (In 2011, another three prefectures hit by the Great East Japan Earthquake postponed their elections).

Current composition[edit]

In the 2012 election on June 10, 2012, governor Hirokazu Nakaima's centre-right supporters (Liberal Democratic Party, Kōmeitō and independents) failed to win a majority. As of 2012, the assembly was composed as follows:[2]

Composition of the Okinawa Prefectural Assembly
Parliamentary group Seats
Liberal Democratic Party 15
Social Democratic Party/Kengo network ("Network to protect the constitution") 8
Kenmin Net ("Prefectural citizens' network") 7
Japanese Communist Party 5
Kōmei kenmin mushozoku ("Justice prefectural citizens independents") 5
Kaikaku no Kai ("Reform assembly" of Sōzō ("Creation") and independents; in August 2012, Sōzō merged with the People's New Party's Okinawa prefectural federation[3]) 3
Socialist Mass Party 2
Independents 3
Total (including vacant seats) 48

Electoral districts[edit]

Most electoral districts in Okinawa correspond to current cities or former counties (the counties, abolished as administrative unit in 1921, had initially by definition served as electoral districts for prefectural assemblies in the Empire).

Electoral districts[4]
District Municipalities Magnitude
Nago City Nago City 2
Uruma City Uruma City 4
Okinawa City Okinawa City 5
Ginowan City Ginowan City 3
Urasoe City Urasoe City 4
Naha City Naha City 11
Tomigusuku City Tomigusuku City 2
Itoman City Itoman City 2
Nanjō City Nanjō City 1
Miyakojima City Miyakojima City
Tarama Village
2
Ishigaki City Ishigaki City
Taketomi Town
Yonaguni Town
2
Kunigami County Kunigami Village
Ōgimi Village
Higashi Village
Nakijin Village
Motobu Town
Onna Village
Ginoza Village
Kin Town
Ie Village
Izena Village
Iheya Village
2
Nakagami County Yomitan Village
Kadena Town
Chatan Town
North Nakagusuku Village
Nakagusuku Village
Nishihara Town
5
Shimajiri County Yaese Town
Yonabaru Town
Haebaru Town
Kumejima Town
Tokashiki Village
Zamami Village
Aguni Village
Tonaki Village
South Daitō Village
North Daitō Village
3

References[edit]

  1. ^ Okinawa Prefectural Assembly: History
  2. ^ Assembly members by parliamentary group(Japanese)
  3. ^ Ryūkyū Shimpō, August 12, 2012: 政党そうぞう、国民新県連と一本化 新代表に下地氏
  4. ^ Okinawa Prefectural Assembly: Organizational structure and electoral districts

External links[edit]