Oklahoma's congressional districts

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Oklahoma's congressional districts since 2013

As of the 2010 census, there are five Oklahoma United States congressional districts. Oklahoma was one of the states that was able to keep the same number of congressional districts from the previous census. Oklahoma in the past had as many as nine House of Representatives seats.

Congressional district 1[edit]

Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District

Oklahoma's First Congressional District is in the northeastern corner of the state and borders Kansas. It includes part of the Tulsa metropolitan area (as well as all of Tulsa County). It also includes Washington County, Wagoner County, and parts of Rogers County and Creek County.

Some of the principal cities in the district (other than Tulsa) include Bartlesville, Broken Arrow, Bixby, Jenks, Sand Springs, and Wagoner.

The district is 89.63 percent urban, 20.18 percent non-white, and has a population that is 5.32 percent Latino and 4.70 percent foreign-born.[1]

Republican John Sullivan was elected in 2006 and represented the district for three terms, until he was defeated in the 2012 Republican primary by Jim Bridenstine. Bridenstine, whose victory was considered one of the biggest upsets of the 2012 cycle, went on to win the general election.

Congressional district 2[edit]

Oklahoma's 2nd Congressional District

Oklahoma's Second Congressional District is in the eastern part of the state. The district borders Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas, and Texas (along the Red River). The district includes (in whole or in part) 24 counties. The northern half of the district includes most of the area of Oklahoma referred to as Green Country, while the southern half of the district includes a part of Oklahoma often referred to as Little Dixie.

Principal cities in the district include Miami, Claremore, Muskogee, Tahlequah, Okmulgee, McAlester, and Durant.

The district is 35.51 percent urban, 23.95 percent non-white, and has a population that is 2.40 percent Latino and 1.36 percent foreign-born.[2]

As of 2013, the district is represented by Republican Markwayne Mullin.

Congressional district 3[edit]

Oklahoma's 3rd Congressional District

Oklahoma's Third Congressional District is the largest congressional district in the state, covering an area of 34,088.49 square miles. It borders New Mexico, Colorado and Kansas, and the Texas panhandle. Altogether, the district includes (in whole or in part) 32 counties.

Principal cities in the district include Guymon, Ponca City, Enid, Stillwater, Mustang, Yukon, Guthrie, Sapulpa and Altus. It also includes portions of Oklahoma City and Tulsa.

The district is 50.71 percent urban, 14.02 percent non-white, and has a population that is 5.19 percent Latino and 2.77 percent foreign-born.[3]

As of 2006, the district is represented by Republican Frank Lucas.

Congressional district 4[edit]

Oklahoma's 4th Congressional District

Oklahoma's Fourth Congressional District is located in south-central Oklahoma and borders Texas (along the Red River). The district covers (in whole or in part) a total of 15 counties. To the north, the district includes a small square-shaped portion of south-central Oklahoma County.

Principal cities in the district include Midwest City, Norman, Moore, Ada, Duncan, Lawton/Ft. Sill, and Ardmore.

The district is 63.29 percent urban, 16.91 percent non-white, and has a population that is 4.81 percent Latino and 3.50 percent foreign-born.[4]

As of 2006, the district is represented by Republican Tom Cole.

Congressional district 5[edit]

Oklahoma's 5th Congressional District

Oklahoma's Fifth Congressional District includes most of Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie County, and Seminole County.

Principal cities in the district include Oklahoma City (the state capital), Edmond, Shawnee, and Seminole.

The district is 87.53 percent urban, 26.17 percent non-white, and has a population that is 8.26 percent Latino and 6.76 percent foreign-born.[5]

The district has been held by a Republican since January 23, 1975, when Democrat John Jarman changed political parties.[6] Before Jarman, the seat had leaned Democratic since 1931.

Ernest J. Istook ran for governor of Oklahoma, and former Lieutenant Governor Mary Fallin won the 5th district seat on November 7, 2006. Representative Mary Fallin, a Republican, took office on January 4, 2007 and served until 2011 when she was elected Governor of Oklahoma. James Lankford, a Republican, was elected to fill the seat.

Historical district boundaries[edit]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rep. Sullivan: District Demographics, That's My Congress (accessed May 11, 2010).
  2. ^ Representative Dan Boren: District Demographics, That's My Congress (accessed May 11, 2010).
  3. ^ Rep. Frank Lucas: District Demographics, That's My Congress (accessed May 11, 2010).
  4. ^ Rep. Tom Cole: District Demographics, That's My Congress (accessed May 11, 2010).
  5. ^ Rep. Mary Fallin: District Demographics, That's My Congress (accessed May 11, 2010).
  6. ^ John Jarman

External links[edit]