Oklahoma State University Medical Center

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Oklahoma State University Medical Center
Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences
Oklahoma state medical center.png
Image of Oklahoma State University Medical Center
Geography
Location Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States
Organization
Hospital type Teaching
Services
Beds 249[1]
History
Founded 1943
Links
Website www.osumc.net
Lists Hospitals in Oklahoma

Oklahoma State University Medical Center (OSU Medical Center) is a teaching hospital with medical clinics located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. OSU medical center operates a large number of osteopathic residency and fellowship programs. The hospital is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program.[2]

The emergency room at OSUMC receives about 45,000 visits per year.[3]

Oklahoma legislators have appropriated $40 million in funding towards improving the hospital's technology and facilities. Among the expected improvements are an expansion of the intensive care unit and renovations to the women's health and neonatal intensive care unit programs. The hospital is the largest osteopathic teaching center in the United States, training 126 resident physicians in primary and sub-specialty care each year.

History[edit]

The OSU Medical Center began as the Oklahoma Osteopathic Hospital, which was created in 1943 by a group of osteopathic physicians. At that time, osteopaths (now known as osteopathic physicians) were barred from obtaining staff positions in conventional hospitals. That situation did not change until the 1990s. The hospital name was later changed to Tulsa Regional Medical Center. In 1996, the non-profit hospital was bought by Columbia/HCA of Nashville, Tennessee.[4] The company later became the target of a federal fraud investigation, which eventually pleaded guilty and paid $1.7 billion in fines. The hospital was sold to Tulsa-based Hillcrest Medical Center, another non-profit, which already owned another hospital in Tulsa. The for-profit Ardent Health Services, also of Nashville, bought the Hillcrest system in 2004. In 2009, the city formed a trust to take over the hospital, which was threatened with closure by lack of funds.[5]

Being affiliated with OSU, the name of the hospital changed from Tulsa Regional Medical Center to Oklahoma State University Medical Center November 2, 2006. The name change was part of a fifty-year academic affiliation agreement between Tulsa Regional Medical Center and the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine signed in the spring of 2006 in order to create a permanent teaching hospital for Oklahoma State University medical students.

Services[edit]

OSU Medical Center has a partnership with OSU Center for Health Sciences and Diagnostic Imaging Associates to provide medical care to rural communities in Oklahoma with a telemedicine program. This program currently includes 35 regional hospital and clinic partners, and is one of the largest state-wide telemedicine programs in the United States.

OSU Medical Center also provides cutting edge cardiology care, comprehensive wound care, and child, adolescent, and geriatric psychiatric care. OSU Medical Center recently expanded its cardiology services and uses Cardiology of Tulsa to oversee its cardiology fellowship program.

Graduate medical education[edit]

OSU Medical Center operates a large number of osteopathic medical residency programs. Training programs include internal medicine,[6] pediatrics,[7] emergency medicine,[8] anesthesiology,[9] diagnostic radiology,[10] general surgery,[11] obstetrics and gynecology,[12] orthopedic surgery.[13] and ophthalmology.[14]

Fellowship programs include cardiology (heart),[15] oncology (cancer),[16] and nephrology (kidney).[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center". 
  2. ^ "Acute Care Hospitals". Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program. 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Adame, Jamie (June 19, 2013). "OSU Medical Center embracing organizational change". Urban Tulsa Weekly. 
  4. ^ "A History of Tulsa Hospitals – 1900-1968". Tulsa County Medical Society. 
  5. ^ Archer, Kim. Tulsa World. "Hospital turns 65 after a year of tension." December 17, 2009.[1]
  6. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Internal Medicine Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  7. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Pediatrics Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  8. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Emergency Medicine Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  9. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Anesthesiology Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  10. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Diagnostic Radiology Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  11. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Surgery-General Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  12. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Obstetrics & Gynecology Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  13. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Orthopedic Surgery Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  14. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Ophthalmology Residency". American Osteopathic Association. 
  15. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Cardiology Fellowship". American Osteopathic Association. 
  16. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Oncology Fellowship". American Osteopathic Association. 
  17. ^ "Oklahoma State University Medical Center - Nephrology Fellowship". American Osteopathic Association. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°08′48″N 96°00′00″W / 36.14667°N 96.00000°W / 36.14667; -96.00000