Old Bridge Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Old Bridge, New Jersey)
Jump to: navigation, search
Old Bridge Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Old Bridge
Map of Old Bridge Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Old Bridge Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Old Bridge Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Old Bridge Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°24′17″N 74°18′31″W / 40.404632°N 74.308537°W / 40.404632; -74.308537Coordinates: 40°24′17″N 74°18′31″W / 40.404632°N 74.308537°W / 40.404632; -74.308537[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated March 2, 1869 as Madison Township
Renamed November 5, 1975 as Old Bridge Township
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act Mayor-Council
 • Mayor Owen Henry (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Christopher R. Marion[4]
 • Clerk Stella Ward[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 40.783 sq mi (105.627 km2)
 • Land 38.060 sq mi (98.575 km2)
 • Water 2.723 sq mi (7.052 km2)  6.68%
Area rank 52nd of 566 in state
3rd of 25 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 65,375
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 66,179
 • Rank 18th of 566 in state
3rd of 25 in county[12]
 • Density 1,717.7/sq mi (663.2/km2)
 • Density rank 312th of 566 in state
22nd of 25 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08857 - Old Bridge[13]
08859 - Parlin[14]
08879 - Laurence Harbor[15]
07721 - Cliffwood Beach[16]
Area code(s) 732/848
FIPS code 3402354705[17][2][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882158[19][2]
Website www.oldbridge.com

Old Bridge Township is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 65,375,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 4,919 (+8.1%) from the 60,456 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,981 (+7.0%) from the 56,475 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] As of the 2010 Census, the township was the state's 18th largest municipality, after being the state's 21st most-populous municipality in 2000.[21] Old Bridge is a bedroom suburb of New York City located across the Raritan Bay from Staten Island, and it is about 25 miles (40 km) from Manhattan,[22] and about 30 miles (48 km) south of Newark.[23]

It was named as a contender for the title of one of the best places to live in the United States by Money magazine in both 2005 and 2007.[24][25]

What is now Old Bridge Township was originally incorporated as Madison Township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 2, 1869, from portions of South Amboy Township (now City of South Amboy).[26] In a referendum held on November 5, 1975, voters approved changing the township's name to Old Bridge Township by a margin of 7,150 votes to 4,888.[27][28] The township's name was changed to avoid confusion with the borough of Madison in Morris County.[27][29] Use of the name Old Bridge for a location "on the Camden and Amboy Railroad, about eight miles (13 km) beyond South Amboy" or "about seven miles (11 km) from South Amboy" goes back, however, to at least 1853.[30] Initially, the township was made up of farms and the population grew slowly. In 1880, the population was 1,662 and in 1950 it had reached only 7,365. Then the building boom started and farms gave way to developments. In 1960, the population was 22,772. The 1980 census cited 51,406 people. A lot of the town changed with the extension of Route 18 to the shore.

Geography[edit]

Old Bridge Township is located at 40°24′17″N 74°18′31″W / 40.404632°N 74.308537°W / 40.404632; -74.308537 (40.404632,-74.308537). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 40.783 square miles (105.627 km2), of which, 38.060 square miles (98.575 km2) of it is land and 2.723 square miles (7.052 km2) of it (6.68%) is water.[1][2]

Brownville (2010 population of 2,383[31]), Laurence Harbor (2010 population of 6,536[32]), Madison Park (2010 population of 7,144[33]) and Old Bridge CDP (2010 population of 23,753[34]) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within Old Bridge Township.[35][36]

Major streams/rivers[edit]

  • Raritan Bay
  • South River
  • Matchaponix Brook
  • Deep Run
  • Tennets Brook
  • Barclay Brook
  • Cheesequake Creek

History[edit]

The first inhabitants of the area known as Old Bridge, were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans. Those who settled in Old Bridge were known as the Unami, or "people down the river."[28] They, like many people today, migrated to the shore along the Raritan each summer from their hunting grounds in the north. When the English gained control from the Dutch in 1664, the state was divided into two provinces, East Jersey and West Jersey. In 1683, the general assembly of East Jersey defined the boundaries of Middlesex County and the three other original counties (Bergen, Essex and Monmouth) as containing all plantations on both sides of the Raritan River, as far as Cheesequake Harbor to the east, then southwest to the Provincial line, with the southwest line being the border of Monmouth and Middlesex Counties and the Township's southern border.[37]

Thomas Warne, one of the original 24 proprietors of East Jersey, was listed as a landowner of this area, and his son is said to have been the earliest white resident residing in the Cheesequake area in 1683. John and Susannah Brown were granted a 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) land grant from the King of England in 1737. They called the area Brownville, and today this part of town is now known as Browntown.[28] Other important proprietors of Old Bridge were the Bowne, Morgan, Letts, Brown, Tone, Herbert and Cottrell families, who date back as some of the first landowners of Old Bridge.

In 1684, South Amboy Township was formed. At that time, it covered an area that now consists of the Townships of Monroe and Old Bridge, the Borough of Sayreville and the City of South Amboy. The Township covers 42 square miles (110 km2) that separated from South Amboy on March 2, 1869, and was called Madison Township.[38] In 1975, the name was changed by referendum to the Township of Old Bridge. The purpose of doing this was to formulate just one postal designations and ZIP code for the township and to differentiate the township from the Borough of Madison in Morris County.[39][40] Old Bridge derives its name from the fact that the first bridge spanning the South River was built there, and as other bridges were built across the river the first one became known as "the Old Bridge." Prior to that, it was known as South River Bridge."[41]

Economic enterprises[edit]

The old mill streams[edit]

Madison Township had many mill streams that were used to generate water power. The Warne family owned fulling mills in the area. Fulling was used as a finishing process used on woolen cloth that would remove the dirt and grease and to compact the wool fibers. The mill is said to have been run behind Old Bridge High School and flows east into the Matawan Creek. The area of Old Bridge was also known for their numerous snuff mills. The Washington Snuff mill (later renamed the Dill Snuff Mill) was established in 1801 and was located on Mount Pleasant and Old Bridge Turnpike (now Route 516). Snuff is a scented tobacco product that was used by men and women during that time period.[42]

Clay industry[edit]

The clay soil in the area surrounding Old Bridge was used for pottery and bricks way before the first European settlers. "Fine clay had surrounded Cheesequake Creek when the Lenni Lenape Native Americans lived there. The early discoveries of clay along the banks opened the clay industry to Middlesex County as well as the state of New Jersey. By the 1800s clay was a major industry. The clay deposits found along Cheesequake Creek are reported to be some of the finest stoneware clays in the United States."[39] The clay supplied local potters as well as those in Hudson Valley, Norwalk, Connecticut, other New England states, and parts of Canada. The earliest use of clay from this area was used by Captain James Morgan before the Revolution. The Perrine clay pit was located near U.S. Route 9 and Ernston Road.[42]

Apple farms[edit]

The Cottrell homestead is a landmark in Old Bridge. It was built in 1831 and still stands today on the northeast corner of County Route 516 and Cottrell Road. The Cottrells owned a 150 acres (0.61 km2) apple orchard that was located across the street from their home. Apples that could not be used because of their size or quality did not go to waste. Across from the cold-storage building on the southwest corner of Cottrell Road and Route 516 (where Rite Aid is now located), the family built the New Jersey Apple Growers Inc. distillery. It was at this distillery that they pressed the apples into cider and distilled the brandy in large vats. The brandy would age in barrels in a government warehouse that was located on the Cottrells' property. The Cottrells produced apple brandy for twenty years on the farm and sold it wholesale to distributors under the name Browntown.[39]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,870
1880 1,662 −11.1%
1890 1,520 −8.5%
1900 1,671 9.9%
1910 1,621 −3.0%
1920 1,808 11.5%
1930 2,566 41.9%
1940 3,803 48.2%
1950 7,366 93.7%
1960 22,772 209.2%
1970 48,715 113.9%
1980 51,515 5.7%
1990 56,475 9.6%
2000 60,456 7.0%
2010 65,375 8.1%
Est. 2012 66,179 [11] 1.2%
Population sources: 1870-1920[43]
1870[44][45] 1880-1890[46]
1890-1910[47] 1910-1930[48]
1930-1990[49] 2000[50][51] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 65,375 people, 23,777 households, and 17,333 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,717.7 per square mile (663.2 /km2). There were 24,638 housing units at an average density of 647.3 per square mile (249.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 74.06% (48,418) White, 6.21% (4,063) Black or African American, 0.20% (129) Native American, 14.34% (9,374) Asian, 0.02% (10) Pacific Islander, 2.72% (1,780) from other races, and 2.45% (1,601) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 10.81% (7,064) of the population.[8]

There were 23,777 households, of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.5% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.25.[8]

In the township, 22.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 95.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,640 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,053) and the median family income was $98,634 (+/- $2,857). Males had a median income of $67,487 (+/- $3,364) versus $48,856 (+/- $3,104) for females. The per capita income for the township was $35,666 (+/- $1,152). About 3.1% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[52]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 60,456 people, 21,438 households, and 15,949 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,587.4 people per square mile (612.8/km²). There were 21,896 housing units at an average density of 574.9 per square mile (222.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 79.48% White, 10.82% Asian, 5.30% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.87% from other races and 2.32% from two or more races. 7.57% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[50][51]

There were 21,438 households out of which 37.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.2% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.30.[50][51]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.[50][51]

The median income for a household in the township was $64,707, and the median income for a family was $74,045. Males had a median income of $51,978 versus $35,462 for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,814. About 3.0% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.0% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[50][51]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Old Bridge Township is governed under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government.[6][53][54]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Old Bridge Township is Owen Henry, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. The Township Council consists of nine members, with six elected to represent wards and three elected at-large from the Township as a whole. The members of the Township Council are Joe Mollis (Ward 1), Mary Sohor (Ward 2), Reginald Butler (Ward 3), Alan Rosencranz (Ward 4), Richard Greene (Ward 5), Lucille Panos (Council Vice President: Ward 6), Brian J. Cahill (At-Large), Dr. James Anderson (At-Large) and Eleanor "Debbie" Walker (Council President: At-Large).[55]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Old Bridge Township is split between the 6th and 12th Congressional Districts[56] and is part of New Jersey's 12th state legislative district.[9][57][58] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Old Bridge Township had been in the 13th state legislative district.[59] Prior to the 2010 Census, Old Bridge Township had also been split between the 6th and 12th Congressional Districts, though with different boundaries, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[59] The split that took effect in 2013 placed 22,050 residents in the township's northern and eastern portions in the 6th District, while 43,325 residents in the in western and southern area of the township were placed in the 12th District.[56][60]

New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[61] New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Rush D. Holt, Jr. (D, Hopewell Township).[62] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[63][64] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[65][66]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 12th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Samuel D. Thompson (R, Old Bridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Robert D. Clifton (R, Matawan) and Ronald S. Dancer (R, Plumsted Township).[67] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[68] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[69]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2014, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with committee chairmanship, party affiliation, residence and term-end year listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (Ex-officio on all committees - D, term ends December 31, 2015; Carteret),[70] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (County Administration - D, 2014; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township),[71] Kenneth Armwood (Business Development and Education - D, 2016; Piscataway),[72] Charles Kenny (Finance - D, 2016; Woodbridge Township),[73] H. James Polos (Public Safety and Health - D, 2015; Highland Park),[74] Charles E. Tomaro (Infrastructure Management - D, 2014; Edison)[75] and Blanquita B. Valenti (Community Services - D, 2016; New Brunswick).[76][77][78][79][80] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D; Old Bridge Township),[81] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016; Piscataway)[82] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[77][83]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 38,907 registered voters in Old Bridge Township, of which 10,946 (28.1%) were registered as Democrats, 6,363 (16.4%) were registered as Republicans and 21,577 (55.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 21 voters registered to other parties.[84]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.0% of the vote here (14,001 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 47.4% (13,019 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (274 votes), among the 27,464 ballots cast by the township's 39,454 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.6%.[85] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 51.0% of the vote here (12,722 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 47.7% (11,884 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (237 votes), among the 24,931 ballots cast by the township's 36,428 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.4.[86]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 57.8% of the vote here (9,511 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 35.9% (5,898 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (976 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (168 votes), among the 16,444 ballots cast by the township's 38,430 registered voters, yielding a 42.8% turnout.[87]

Education[edit]

The Old Bridge Township Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[88]) are twelve K-5 elementary schools — M. Scott Carpenter Elementary School[89] (285 students), Cheesequake Elementary School[90] (315), Leroy Gordon Cooper Elementary School[91] (272), Virgil I. Grissom Elementary School[92] (234), James A. McDivitt Elementary School[93] (532), Madison Park Elementary School[94] (316), Memorial Elementary School[95] (432), William A. Miller Elementary School[96] (337), Walter M. Schirra Elementary School[97] (374), Alan B. Shepard Elementary School[98] (290), Southwood Elementary School[99] (316) and Raymond E. Voorhees Elementary School[100] (413) — both Jonas Salk Middle School[101] (985) and Carl Sandburg Middle School[102] (1,250) for grades 6-8 and Old Bridge High School[103] for grades 9-12 (3,052).[104][105]

Transportation[edit]

Map of Cheesequake State Park in Old Bridge

The Garden State Parkway passes through Old Bridge for about 1.9 miles (3.1 km) miles and houses Interchange 120. Other routes, such as U.S. 9, Route 18, Route 34 and Route 35 also pass through the township. Old Bridge Airport is located 5 miles (8.0 km) south of the central business district. Some major county routes that pass through are County Route 516, County Route 520, County Route 527 and County Route 615.

The New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) is minutes north along Route 18 outside the township in bordering East Brunswick Township (Exit 9) and not too far also in bordering Monroe Township (Exit 8A).

Old Bridge also borders Matawan Borough on Route 34, and the Aberdeen-Matawan (NJT station). There is a large New Jersey Transit bus terminal along Route 9 northbound, close to Ernston Road. New Jersey Transit Bus Operations provides route 131, 133, 134, 135, 138, and 139 to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, service to Newark on the 67, on the 68 to Jersey City and local service on the 817 and 818 routes.[106]

Emergency services[edit]

Police Department[edit]

Old Bridge maintains a full-time police department consisting of over 81 sworn personnel divided into multiple bureaus.[107] The police department handles approximately 50,000 to 55,000 calls for service each year.

  • Administration Bureau: Chief of Police. Police radio, computer, 9-1-1, and dispatch operations. Training, scheduling etc.
  • Patrol Bureau: First responders for calls of service, motor vehicle crash investigators, motor vehicle and criminal law enforcement, road construction, special operations.
  • Traffic Safety Bureau: All traffic enforcement, road construction planning, commuter lot parking enforcement, state funded grants (i.e.:seatbelt enforcement, mobile phone enforcement, child seat, pedestrian etc.) serious and fatal motor vehicle crash investigations, large scale lane closings for events or crashes, road striping, traffic sign replacement and repair, ATV details, special events. Security of impounded vehicles.
  • Detective Bureau: Investigates all serious offenses and crimes, serious and fatal motor vehicle crash investigations, plain clothes operations. Works closely with FBI, United States Secret Service, Alcohol Beverage Control and other federal agencies.
  • Identification Bureau: Works in conjunction with the detective bureau, documents all serious crime scenes, photography for crime scenes and fatal/serious motor vehicle crashes, fingerprinting, evidence collection,processing and storing, civilian background checks, Megans Law enforcement, firearms application investigating and processing.
  • Narcotics Bureau: All drug- and alcohol-related investigations, undercover operations, surveillance, liaisons with Prosecutors office, special operations, raids. Keeps a close relationship with the DEA.
  • Fire Arms Unit: Officers trained in qualifying and training all police personnel in weapons systems. This unit repairs and maintains firearms, gear and schedules all state mandated firearms training for the officers. Orders ammunition and supplies related to officer gear.
  • Special Operations: Department of Homeland Security liaisons, Laurence Harbor and Cliffwood Beach boardwalk and beachfront details, anti-terrorism and counter-terrorism training, covert operations.
  • Police Garage: Mechanics trained in police vehicle repair, wiring, maintenance, storage of impounded vehicles.
  • Auxiliary Police: Patrol in marked cars and uniform. They augment the regular officers while on patrol. Auxiliary officers provide additional security for events and details, parade traffic assistance, township fairs, carnivals, benefit functions etc. These officers fall under the Office of Emergency Management section of the township and are all volunteers, receiving no paychecks for their services.
  • Special police officers: Most of these "specials" employees are classified as Class I officers. They provide security at parks and recreation areas, conduct crowd control and are frequently used on court days to handle prisoners. They also serve as another set of "eyes and ears" for the patrol bureau. Class II officers are also employed in the township. They do the same as the Class I officers, however, not many remain.

Fire departments[edit]

Old Bridge is divided into four fire districts:[108]

  • Fire District 1: Laurence Harbor Fire Department, established in 1924 and operating out of two stations.[109]
  • Fire District 2: Cheesequake Volunteer Fire Company, with Station 1 at 113 Route 34, Station 2 at 4290 Route 516 and Station 3 at 3080 Route 516.[110]
  • Fire District 3: South Old Bridge Volunteer Fire Company, established in 1947 and operating out of three stations, with Engine Company 1 located at 958 Englishtown Road, Engine Company 2 at 14 Throckmorton Lane and Engine Company 3 at 1599 Englishtown Road.[111][112]
  • Fire District 4: Madison Park Volunteer Fire Company

Each of the above have several different fire houses with adequate equipment and trucks to handle any and all situations that arise within the township or surrounding towns. Old Bridge is equipped for:

  • HAZMAT
  • Tower rescue
  • Water rescue/ice rescue
  • Heavy Duty rescue
  • General search and rescue
  • Wildland firefighting
  • Trench rescue

Medical/first aid services[edit]

Old Bridge is divided into five districts each with a volunteer first aid squad. Numerous ambulances are in service for the community. A paid squad is employed between the hours of 6am to 6pm.

  • Cheesequake Volunteer First Aid Squad
  • Madison Park Volunteer First Aid Squad
  • Laurence Harbor Volunteer First Aid Squad
  • Old Bridge First Aid and Rescue (nicknamed "Red & White" due to the color of their ambulances)
  • Old Bridge Volunteer Emergency Medical Services (nicknamed "Green & White" due to the color of their ambulances)

Old Bridge Township Emergency Medical Services (OBTEMS) is an all-paid squad which is not affiliated with any of the five volunteer organizations or the Township itself.[113]

Advanced Life support or "ALS" for short, also known as medics, are paid personnel dispatched to all township calls based on the requirements of assistance. Medics respond to all life/death situations due to a tramatic injury, industrial accident, heart problems, strokes, serious vehicle crashes, etc. The medics are housed by Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, St. Peters University Hospital and Raritan Bay Medical Center. Each are assigned their own ambulance.

The Old Bridge Division is located at the intersection of New Jersey Route 18 and Ferry Road. This hospital handles all but trauma cases. Most trauma cases are handled by Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in close-by New Brunswick.

Old Bridge also has many long term care facilities and nursing homes.

Township attractions[edit]

Community and historical information[edit]

  • Old Bridge Township shares a border with New York City, sharing a boundary with the borough of Staten Island separated only by the Raritan Bay. Other borders are East Brunswick Township, Marlboro Township, Manalapan Township, Borough of Matawan, Aberdeen Township, Borough of Sayreville, Borough of Spotswood and Monroe Township.
  • Old Bridge has the 14th worst superfund site in America. That area is fenced off along Waterworks Road, near Cheesequake Road. This area has one chemical plant still operating, Old Bridge Chemical. A former plant, Ciba Chemical closed several years ago and a bulk of the plant was demolished, only the office building remains.
  • Many small ponds in the area are remnants of clay pits dug in the 19th century, as clay was a major industry. The Perrine clay pit was located near Route 9 and Ernston Road.
  • The Runyon coal yards were located off Bordentown Avenue and Cheesequake Road, where Stavola Asphalt Construction Company (formerly Manzos Contracting) currently operates. Rail cars at this yard were used to transport their loads to the South Amboy docks, where the coal was shipped to New York City.
  • Pilings of former docks can be found by foot traversing Steamboat Landing Road, also known as Dock Road, which is the extension of Cottrell road at its intersection with Route 34.
  • The Ochwald Brickworks, now the site of Bridgepointe Development in Laurence Harbor, began operation in 1910 and continued operation into the early 1960s. Behind the Bridgepointe Development and far into the woodline and field, old bricks can still be found.
  • The Kepec Chemical Company in the Genoa section (off County Road) is where the Rosenburgs allegedly contacted Russian spies in 1950. The FBI conducted surveillance of the building at the corner of Biondi Avenue and Gordon Street. Only a few bricks remain to mark this location at the foot of Columbus Avenue. In the past 10 years, this old Genoa section has experienced new houses and the demolition of old.
  • A mass grave in the Ernst Memorial Cemetery off Ernston Road holds the remains of over a dozen unidentified victims of the T. A. Gillespie Company Shell Loading Plant explosion of 1918. This plant exploded in the Morgan section of neighboring Sayreville killing over an estimated 100 persons. Shock waves were felt as far north as Newark.
  • A horse-racing track used to be located where present day Lakeridge development now stands (near the border with Matawan Borough.)
  • A circular car racing track (early 1950s to approximately 1982) used to be located off CR516 where the Whispering Pines Development is now. No visible trace remains.
  • Cheesequake State Park, one of the oldest in the country, opening on June 22, 1940 is located in Old Bridge. With this park near the Garden State Parkway interchange 120, New Jersey Route 34 and New Jersey Route 35 it is often crowded by sunbathers, picnics, concert goers (nearby PNC Arts center) and tourists.
  • A cold war era Nike missile base is located off U.S. Route 9 on Jake Brown Road. Listed in Weird NJ as a haunted site, readers frequent this area and explore the fields where former base worker residences once stood. The actual base was purchased by Old Bridge Township Board of Education and is currently used to store their own supplies and vehicles. The former underground silos and tunnels were purposely flooded and caved in when the base was closed.
  • Old Bridge Township Raceway Park, the world renown racetrack that hosts funny car and drag races, is located off Route 527 (Englishtown Road) near the township's border with Manalapan and Monroe.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Old Bridge Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Staff Directory, Old Bridge Township. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  5. ^ Township Clerk; Staff Directory, Old Bridge Township. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 67.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Old Bridge, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Old Bridge township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Old Bridge township, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Old Bridge, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Parlin, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Laurence Harbor, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cliffwood, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  21. ^ The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  22. ^ Mulvihill, Geoff; and Cortez, Julio. "Official: 3 dead in NJ supermarket shooting"." Houston Chronicle, from the Denver Post, August 31, 2012. Accessed August 31, 2012. "Old Bridge is a bedroom suburb of about 23,000 about 25 miles from Manhattan but just across the Raritan Bay from Staten Island."
  23. ^ Ariosto, David. "Gunman kills two, then himself, at New Jersey supermarket, authorities say." CNN. August 31, 2012. Retrieved on August 31, 2012.
  24. ^ MONEY Magazine Best places to live 2007, Money (magazine).
  25. ^ Best Places to Live 2005, Money (magazine).
  26. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 170. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  27. ^ a b "New Names Voted for 2 Communities", The New York Times, November 6, 1975. p. 88
  28. ^ a b c History, Old Bridge Township. Accessed January 30, 2012.
  29. ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living in: Old Bridge", The New York Times, April 21, 1991. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  30. ^ Staff. "ANOTHER RAILROAD TRAGEDY.; Collision on the Camden and Amboy Railroad. Five Persons Killed---Others Dying,---Twenty or Thirty Injured. Indignation Meeting of the Passengers--Speeches and Resolutions. Particulars from an Eye-Witness. Other Accounts by Various Passengers given to our Reporters. Another Account. Meeting of the Passengers--Speeches, Resolutions, &c., delivered and drawn up at the Scene of the Calamity. ANOTHER RAILROAD TRAGEDY. By Telegraph.", The New York Times, August 10, 1853. Accessed January 30, 2012.
  31. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Brownville CDP, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  32. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Laurence Harbor CDP, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  33. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Madison Park CDP, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  34. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Old Bridge CDP, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  35. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  36. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  37. ^ De Angelo, Walter A. History Buff's: The Hitchhiker's Guide to Middlesex County, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed June 15, 2012. "On March 7, 1683, the Assembly of East Jersey established four counties, Middlesex, Bergen, Essex and Monmouth. Middlesex County’s original boundaries ran from the Essex County line eastward as far as Cheesequake Harbour, then southwest to the boundary between the provinces of East and West Jersey, and then northwest to the provincial boundary of East Jersey."
  38. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 165. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c Launay, Michael J. Images of America: Old Bridge. Charleston, SC. Arcadia Publishing, 2002.
  40. ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Old Bridge Township, N.J.; Fast Growing, but With a Rural Ambience", The New York Times, February 20, 2000. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  41. ^ History of East Brunswick, East Brunswick Historical Society. Accessed January 30, 2012.
  42. ^ a b Disbrow Martin, Alvia. At the Headwaters of Cheesequake Creek. South Amboy: Madison Township Historical Society, 1979.
  43. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 246, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed August 6, 2013. "Madison was formed from South Amboy township in 1869, and in 1870 had a population of 1,634. Jacksonville is at the head of Cheesquake creek."
  45. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  46. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  47. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed May 11, 2012.
  48. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  49. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  50. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Old Bridge township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  51. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Old Bridge township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  52. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Old Bridge township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  53. ^ Form of Government: The Faulkner Act, Old Bridge Township. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  54. ^ Form of Government, Old Bridge Township. Accessed March 11, 2012.
  55. ^ Township Council, Old Bridge Township. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  56. ^ a b Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  57. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  58. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  59. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  60. ^ New Jersey Congressional Districts 2012 - 2021: Old Bridge, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  61. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  62. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  63. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  64. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  65. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  66. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  67. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 27, 2014.
  68. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  69. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  70. ^ Ronald G. Rios, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  71. ^ Carol Barrett Bellante, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  72. ^ Kenneth Armwood, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  73. ^ Charles Kenny, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  74. ^ H. James Polos, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  75. ^ Charles E. Tomaro, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  76. ^ Blanquita B. Valenti, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  77. ^ a b Elected County Officials, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  78. ^ 11/5/2013 General Election Unofficial Results, Middlesex County, November 12, 2013. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  79. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2012", NJ.com, November 6, 2012, updated November 13, 2012. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  80. ^ Staff. "Middlesex County election results 2011", The Star-Ledger, November 8, 2011. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  81. ^ County Clerk, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  82. ^ Sheriff, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  83. ^ Surrogate, Middlesex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 14, 2014.
  84. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Middlesex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  85. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  86. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  87. ^ 2009 Governor: Middlesex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  88. ^ School Data for the Old Bridge Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 25, 2012.
  89. ^ M. Scott Carpenter Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  90. ^ Cheesequake Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  91. ^ Leroy Gordon Cooper Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  92. ^ Virgil I. Grissom Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  93. ^ James A. McDivitt Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  94. ^ Madison Park Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  95. ^ Memorial Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  96. ^ William A. Miller Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  97. ^ Walter M. Schirra Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  98. ^ Alan B. Shepard Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  99. ^ Southwood Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  100. ^ Raymond E. Voorhees Elementary School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  101. ^ Jonas Salk Middle School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  102. ^ Carl Sandburg Middle School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  103. ^ Old Bridge High School, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  104. ^ Schools, Old Bridge Township Public Schools. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  105. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Old Bridge Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  106. ^ Middlesex County Bus / Rail Connections, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 28, 2011.
  107. ^ Police Department, Old Bridge Township. Accessed January 30, 2012.
  108. ^ About Us, Cheesequake Volunteer Fire Company. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  109. ^ History, Laurence Harbor Fire Department. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  110. ^ Home Page, Cheesequake Volunteer Fire Company. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  111. ^ Department History, South Old Bridge Volunteer Fire Company. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  112. ^ Stations, South Old Bridge Volunteer Fire Company. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  113. ^ Home page, Old Bridge Township Emergency Medical Services. Accessed June 15, 2012.
  114. ^ Staff. "Hurt so good", Home News Tribune, March 14, 2008. Accessed February 7, 2011. "Spatola and Ansley (bass) both grew up in Old Bridge and went to shows and performed at the former Birch Hill Night Club in the township..."
  115. ^ Theodore Frank Appleby, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 30, 2007.
  116. ^ Press Release, United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, October 19, 2000. Accessed February 7, 2011.
  117. ^ Tejada, Miguel Cruz. "Junot Díaz dice “en RD hay muchos quirinos”; escribirá obra inspirada en caso", El Nuevo Diario (Dominican Republic), August 11, 2008. Accessed August 25, 2008. "Hizo el bachillerato en el Cedar Ridge High School de Old Bridge, Nueva Jersey, en 1987, y se licenció en inglés en la Universidad Rutgers (1992), e hizo un Master of Fine Arts en la Universidad de Cornell."
  118. ^ "OFF THE RECORD: A Fine New Jersey 'Colleen'", Irish Voice, May 1, 2001. Accessed August 10, 2007. "COLLEEN Fitzpatrick, a comely lass from Old Bridge, New Jersey, is the media dynamo behind the concept known as Vitamin C."
  119. ^ Celano, Claire Marie. "Young author offers tips to audience at workshop: Caren Lissner says love of writing should be first ingredient toward success", News Transcript, July 30, 2003. Accessed August 25, 2008. "Lissner, 31, grew up in Freehold Township and attended the Laura Donovan School and the Barkalow Middle School.... She later graduated from high school in Old Bridge."
  120. ^ Cahillane, Kevin. "For the Stars of ‘Clerks,’ It’s Take Two", The New York Times, July 14, 2006. Accessed June 8, 2008. "Mr. O’Halloran, a resident of Old Bridge since age 13, has not had to go the McJob route."
  121. ^ "Jodi Lyn O'Keefe about Hallmark Movie Class", Official Site Jodi Lyn O'Keefe. Accessed November 6, 2010.
  122. ^ Mifflin, Lawrie. "Doing a Star Turn for the Home Team, at Last", The New York Times, August 18, 1996. Accessed March 11, 2012. "Giants Stadium is a short trip up the turnpike from Old Bridge, where Mr. Ramos lives with his wife, Amy -- a former North Carolina State University soccer player like her husband -- and their 16-month-old son, Alex. And it's just a few miles from where he grew up, in Harrison and Kearny, towns that have been soccer hotbeds for generations."
  123. ^ Galdden, Michelle. "Show benefits those with ALS, other illnesses", Asbury Park Press, May 7, 2005. Accessed November 3, 2012, "'The idea is that the money is not earmarked just for research,' said George Rizzi of Old Bridge and a member of The Happenings."
  124. ^ Weinraub, Bernard. "Jersey Girl Makes It Big, at Least on TV", The New York Times, June 20, 2000. Accessed November 25, 2012. "After years of struggling as a writer and working as a waitress and bartender in and around the working- and middle-class North Jersey towns North Arlington and East Rutherford, Ms. Ruggiero (ROUGE-ear-oh) has been plucked from obscurity to write and help produce a new autobiographical television comedy series, That's Life, on CBS."
  125. ^ Singerman, Philip. "FIELD OF DREAMS THIS BASEBALL SEASON, THESE THREE MEN SHARE LIFE IN THE MINOR LEAGUES. BUT THEIR SIGHTS ARE SET HIGHER:TWO IN THE FUTURE, ONE IN THE PAST.", Orlando Sentinel, August 11, 1985. Accessed February 15, 2011. "It's always that way for Oujo, 26, a native of Old Bridge N.J. now in his fifth season as a professional umpire... His next door neighbor Ed Sanicki a former major-league player with the Philadelphia Phillies told him that umpiring Little League games would be a much better way to earn extra money than working in a McDonald's..."
  126. ^ Rose, Lisa. "Once 600 pounds, mom from Old Bridge puts down the fork and turns off the webcam", The Star-Ledger, December 18, 2011. Accessed January 30, 2012. "A mother of two from Old Bridge became a tabloid phenomenon last year after saying she was proud of her 600-pound physique, and wouldn’t mind getting bigger. Donna Simpson capitalized on the notoriety that followed, as her internet modeling career took off and traffic increased on her website, where voyeurs could watch her eat on camera for $19 a month."
  127. ^ Smith, Jessica. "TV news reporter recalls how her career took off: OBHS grad became first helicopter reporter to win national Emmy", Old Bridge Suburban, July 3, 2008. Accessed February 7, 2011. "OLD BRIDGE - Though Emmy Award-winning television reporter Shannon Sohn always has a "Plan B" in case things do not go her way, everything seems to have fallen into place quite nicely for her."
  128. ^ William Halstead Sutphin, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 30, 2007.

External links[edit]