Old Grand-Dad

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Old Grand-Dad
Old Grand Dad.jpg
Type Bourbon whiskey
Manufacturer Beam Suntory
Country of origin Kentucky, United States
Introduced 1840
Alcohol by volume 40%, 43%, 50%, 57%
Proof 80, 86, 100, 114
Related products Jim Beam

Old Grand-Dad is a brand of bourbon whiskey distilled at the Jim Beam Plant in Clermont, Kentucky. The brand was created by Raymond B. Hayden and named after his grandfather Basil Hayden, Sr., a well known distiller during his lifetime who is depicted on the front of each bottle. Today, it is owned and produced by Beam Suntory.

Currently Old Grand-Dad, Old Crow, and Old Overholt are marketed together as The Olds.

History[edit]

The Hayden family's first commercial distillery was created in 1840, and the whiskey has been in production since that time despite several changes of ownership. In 1899, Old Grand-Dad was sold to the Wathen family, whose broad interests in the whiskey business later formed the American Medicinal Spirits Company and the foundations of National Distillers Group. During prohibition, the company produced "medicinal whiskey" for sick, blind, and lame patients. In 1987, National Distillers Group sold the spirits business to the Fortune Brands holding company, which became Beam Inc.

Today, Old Grand-Dad is one of the ten best-selling straight whiskeys.[citation needed] It comes in three different bottling proofs: 80 proof, 100 proof Bottled In Bond, and 114 Barrel Proof in a short-height bottle gift box package. In 2013 the lower proof offering went from 86 proof to 80 proof.

Beam now also markets another brand of Kentucky bourbon, Basil Hayden's, that is named after the same person.

References in Media[edit]

  • Old Grand-Dad is featured prominently in the opening scenes of the film Bad Santa and in the Nick Stefanos novels by George P. Pelecanos, as well as in John Hawkes's classic novel Second Skin.
  • Former Pennsylvania State University football coach Joe Paterno's son suggested that his father enjoyed Old Grand-Dad on the rocks.[1]
  • The fictional character Morgan Kane, from the book series of the same name, always drank Old Grand-Dad if it was available and took a bottle or three with him most of the times he had to venture too far from a liquor store or a bar to his liking.
  • George Thorogood references Old Grand-Dad whiskey in his song "I Drink Alone", in the lyrics "...the only one who will hang out with me is my dear Old Grand-Dad..." Old Grand-Dad is cited in the Lynyrd Skynyrd song "Whiskey Rock-a-Roller" (from the 1975 album Nuthin' Fancy) saying, "She likes to drink Old Grand-Dad, and her shoes do shuffle around".
  • Old Grand-Dad is specified by James Bond in the novel Live and Let Die for his Old Fashioned.
  • It is also mentioned in the Hank Williams, Jr. song "Women I've Never Had": "I like sweet young things and Old Grand-Dad, and I like to have women I've never had".
  • In Cormac McCarthy's Cities of the Plain novel, Old Grand-Dad is the drink of choice for many of the characters.
  • In his book Truman, David G. McCullough writes extensively about President Harry S. Truman's love for bourbon, in which he was joined by his wife Bess. He further writes that the President's preferred drink was Old Grand-Dad on the rocks.
  • In Raymond Chandler's 1953 novel, The Long Goodbye, the main protagonist, detective Philip Marlowe, offers Old Grand-Dad to his friend Terry Lennox after he arrives at Marlowe's apartment despondent and with a gun.
  • The author Charles Bukowski frequently mentioned "Old Grand-Dad" is his stories.
  • In Hank Searls' 1978 novel, Jaws 2, one of the attack victims drinks coffee laced with Old Grand-Dad to calm his nerves before going scuba diving.
  • Kolt "Racer" Raynor, the lead character of Dalton Fury's books Black Site and Tier One Wild, prefers Old Grand-Dad.
  • In the Veronica Mars (film), Cindy "Mac" Mackenzie insists that Veronica bring her a glass of Old Grand-Dad after being dragged to their ten-year high school reunion.

References[edit]

External links[edit]