Old Tappan, New Jersey

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Old Tappan, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Old Tappan
Map highlighting Old Tappan's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Old Tappan's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Old Tappan, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Old Tappan, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°01′49″N 73°59′09″W / 41.030312°N 73.985919°W / 41.030312; -73.985919Coordinates: 41°01′49″N 73°59′09″W / 41.030312°N 73.985919°W / 41.030312; -73.985919[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated October 18, 1894
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Victor M. Polce (R, term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Patrick O'Brien[4]
 • Clerk Jean M. Donch[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 4.197 sq mi (10.870 km2)
 • Land 3.332 sq mi (8.629 km2)
 • Water 0.865 sq mi (2.241 km2)  20.62%
Area rank 292nd of 566 in state
19th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 5,750
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 5,874
 • Rank 357th of 566 in state
55th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density 1,725.8/sq mi (666.3/km2)
 • Density rank 311th of 566 in state
59th of 70 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07675[12][13]
Area code(s) 201[14]
FIPS code 3400354870[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885336[17][2]
Website oldtappan.net

Old Tappan (/ld təˈpæn/ tə-PAN) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,750,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 268 (+4.9%) from the 5,482 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,228 (+28.9%) from the 4,254 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Old Tappan was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on October 18, 1894, from portions of Harrington Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier.[19] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[20] On April 23, 1896, additional territory was annexed from Harrington Township.[19]

Geography[edit]

The Lake Tappan reservoir straddles the Bergen County municipalities of Old Tappan and River Vale, as well as a smaller portion within adjacent Rockland County, New York.

Old Tappan is located at 41°01′49″N 73°59′09″W / 41.030312°N 73.985919°W / 41.030312; -73.985919 (41.030312,-73.985919). According to the United States Census Bureau, Old Tappan borough had a total area of 4.197 square miles (10.870 km2), of which, 3.332 square miles (8.629 km2) of it was land and 0.865 square miles (2.241 km2) of it (20.62%) was water.[1][2]

One of only four confluence points in New Jersey, the 41°N 74°W crossing, is in Old Tappan on watershed property owned by United Water (see link below).

The borough is bordered to the north by the hamlet of Tappan in the town of Orangetown, New York. Lake Tappan and the Hackensack River are on the western side of the town, bordering River Vale. Harrington Park is to the south and Northvale and Norwood are to the east.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 269
1910 305 13.4%
1920 404 32.5%
1930 600 48.5%
1940 609 1.5%
1950 828 36.0%
1960 2,330 181.4%
1970 3,917 68.1%
1980 4,168 6.4%
1990 4,254 2.1%
2000 5,482 28.9%
2010 5,750 4.9%
Est. 2013 5,874 [10][21] 2.2%
Population sources:
1900-1920[22] 1900-1910[23]
1910-1930[24] 1900-2010[25][26][27]
2000[28][29] 2010[7][8][9]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,750 people, 1,931 households, and 1,593 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,725.8 per square mile (666.3/km2). There were 1,995 housing units at an average density of 598.8 per square mile (231.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 74.78% (4,300) White, 0.73% (42) Black or African American, 0.09% (5) Native American, 22.24% (1,279) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.63% (36) from other races, and 1.53% (88) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.01% (288) of the population.[7] Korean Americans accounted for 17.1% of the population.[7]

There were 1,931 households, of which 40.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.1% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.5% were non-families. 16.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.98 and the average family size was 3.35.[7]

In the borough, 27.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 18.0% from 25 to 44, 32.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.2 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $125,435 (with a margin of error of +/- $30,643) and the median family income was $158,140 (+/- $27,026). Males had a median income of $90,536 (+/- $18,555) versus $61,875 (+/- $9,686) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $58,673 (+/- $7,319). About 2.4% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.8% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Same-sex couples headed 8 households in 2010, an increase from the 6 counted in 2000.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 5,482 people, 1,778 households, and 1,541 families residing in the borough. There were 1,804 housing units at an average density of 558.6 per square mile (215.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 82.69% Caucasian, 15.63% Asian, 0.60% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.44% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 2.75% of the population.[28][29]

In 2000, there were 1,778 households out of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.7% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.3% were non-families. 12.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.02 and the average family size was 3.28.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 27.0% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $102,127, and the median income for a family was $106,772. Males had a median income of $77,635 versus $48,047 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $48,367. About 1.0% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and 3.1% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Old Tappan is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Old Tappan, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[32] This seven-member governing body enacts local ordinances, levies municipal taxes, conducts the affairs of the borough and in almost all cases, can review and approve the actions of other borough boards, committees and agencies. The Mayor and Borough Council conducts all of it business during monthly meetings open to the public. All legislative powers of the Borough are exercised by the Mayor and Council in the form of a resolution, ordinance or proclamation.[33]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Old Tappan is Republican Victor Polce, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Old Tappan Borough Council are Ron Binaghi (R, 2014), Guy Carnazza (R, 2015), Victor Cioce (R, 2016), Anna Haverilla (R, 2015), John Kramer (R, 2014) and Matt Nalbandian (R, 2016).[33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Old Tappan is located in the 5th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[8][42][43]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[45][46] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[47][48]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Bob Schroeder (R, Washington Township, Bergen County).[49] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[50] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[51]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[52] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[53] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[54] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[55] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[56] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[57] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[58] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[59] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[60] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[61][62] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[63] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[64] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[65][66][52]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,821 registered voters in Old Tappan, of which 749 (19.6% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,015 (26.6% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,057 (53.8% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[67] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 66.5% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 91.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[67][68]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,792 votes here (61.8% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,072 votes (37.0% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 23 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 2,898 ballots cast by the borough's 4,040 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.7% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[69][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,736 votes here (56.3% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,309 votes (42.4% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 17 votes (0.6% vs. 0.8%), among the 3,084 ballots cast by the borough's 3,986 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.4% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[71][72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,690 votes here (56.2% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,289 votes (42.9% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 20 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,006 ballots cast by the borough's 3,848 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.1% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,201 votes here (61.0% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 671 votes (34.1% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 72 votes (3.7% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 6 votes (0.3% vs. 0.5%), among the 1,969 ballots cast by the borough's 3,921 registered voters, yielding a 50.2% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[74]

Emergency services[edit]

Police[edit]

The Old Tappan Police Department provides police services to the Borough of Old Tappan. As of 2011, there are a total of 13 members of the department: one Chief, one Captain, three Sergeants, and eight Officers.[75] The OTPD is a full-time department funded by taxes.

The force is responsible for all aspects of policing in the borough, including responding to fire and medical emergency calls. Each patrol car is equipped with a first aid kit, oxygen tank, and an automated external defibrillator.

Dispatching is provided by the 9-1-1 call center at the River Vale Police Department as part of an interlocal arrangement that dates back to the late 1970s.[76]

Officers of the Old Tappan Police Department are members of Pascack Valley Local 206 of the New Jersey State Policemen's Benevolent Association.[77]

Fire[edit]

The Old Tappan Volunteer Fire Department (OTVFD) is an all-volunteer fire department. Established in 1932, the department consists of one Chief, one Deputy Chief, one Captain, and four Lieutenants. In addition, there is a Fire Marshal who heads the Old Tappan Bureau of Fire Prevention. The department is staffed by approximately 55 fully trained firefighters, and is a municipal-run public volunteer fire department that is funded by taxes. Dispatching is provided by the 9-1-1 call center at the River Vale Police Department.[78]

The OTVFD has one station, located at 231 Old Tappan Road. The station houses two pumpers, Engine 64 (first due) and Engine 62, one tower ladder, Ladder 63, and one rescue unit, Rescue 61.

Ambulance[edit]

Old Tappan Sunday School, Old Tappan Road

The Old Tappan First Aid Corps (OTFAC) was started in 1939, and is located at 4 Russell Avenue. The corps is run by administrative officers, line officers, and Trustees. The administrative officers are the President, Vice President, Treasurer, Assistant Treasurer, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, and Financial Secretary. The line officers are the Captain, 1st Lieutenant, and 2nd Lieutenant. The OTFAC is an all-volunteer independent public emergency medical service. As such, they do not bill for services, and their equipment is not directly paid for by the borough. Funding is provided by donations and support from the borough.

The corps provides basic life support, and is staffed primarily by certified Emergency Medical Technicians. CPR-trained drivers are also sometimes on duty. They have two Type III ambulances, Ambulance 66 and Ambulance 68. Dispatching is provided by the 9-1-1 call center at the River Vale Police Department.

The primary jurisdiction of the OTFAC is the Borough of Old Tappan, but the corps also regularly responds to requests for mutual aid from the neighboring First Aid Squads of River Vale, Emerson, Washington Township, Westwood, Hillsdale, and Tri-Boro (Park Ridge, Woodcliff Lake, and Montvale).

The OTFAC is a member of the New Jersey State First Aid Council, the Pascack Valley Volunteer Ambulance Association, and the Pascack Valley Mutual Aid Group.

Education[edit]

The Old Tappan Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 770 students and 63.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.20:1.[79] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[80]) are T. Baldwin Demarest Elementary School[81] serving grades K - 4 (380 students) and Charles DeWolf Middle School[82] serving grades 5 - 8 (390 students).[83]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, together with students from Harrington Park, Northvale and Norwood,[84] along with students from Rockleigh who attend the high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[85] The school is one of the two schools of the Northern Valley Regional High School District, which also serves students from the neighboring communities of Closter, Demarest, Haworth at the Northern Valley Regional High School at Demarest.[86]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[87][88]

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 32.72 miles (52.66 km) of roadways, of which 27.54 miles (44.32 km) were maintained by the municipality and 5.18 miles (8.34 km) by Bergen County.[89]

Main roads include Old Tappan Road, Washington Avenue, Westwood Avenue, and Orangeburg Road.

Public transportation[edit]

Rockland Coaches provides service on routes 14ET to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[90][91]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Old Tappan include:

Historic sites[edit]

Old Tappan is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:[102]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  4. ^ a b Administrator/Clerk, Borough of Old Tappan. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 165.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Old Tappan, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Old Tappan borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 24, 2011.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Old Tappan borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 24, 2011.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Old Tappan, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 15, 2011.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
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  29. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Old Tappan borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  30. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Old Tappan borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 10, 2012.
  31. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 3, 2013. Accessed October 14, 2014.
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  33. ^ a b Mayor and Council, Borough of Old Tappan. Accessed October 14, 2014. A 2013 date is listed as of date accessed.
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  38. ^ Albrizio, Lianna. "Old Tappan's Polce wins another term as mayor", Northern Valley Suburbanite, November 8, 2011. Accessed January 10, 2012. "Republican incumbent Victor Polce was re-elected mayor of Old Tappan for a fourth term, while incumbents John Kramer and Ronald Binaghi, Jr. won council seats in uncontested elections."
  39. ^ Kwon, Grace. "No surprises in uncontested races in the Northern Valley", Northern Valley Suburbanite, November 6, 2012. "Old Tappan Republican incumbents Anna Haverilla and Guy Carnazza will retain their seats on the council with 1523 and 1481 votes respectively."
  40. ^ Mayor and Council Reorganization Meeting - Second Half, January 7, 2013, Borough of Old Tappan. Accessed September 3, 2013. "NOMINATION FOR COUNCIL PRESIDENT: Motion to nominate Councilman Cioce for Council President - Councilman Carnazza"
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  58. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  59. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  60. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  61. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
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  74. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  75. ^ Our Staff, Old Tappan Police Department. Accessed December 24, 2011.
  76. ^ Redmond, Kimberley. "Dispatch agreement with Old Tappan renewed", Pascack Valley Community Life, October 28, 2009. Accessed December 24, 2011. "During the Monday, Oct. 26 River Vale Council meeting, Mayor Joseph Blundo called attention to the importance of a recent renewal of an interlocal services agreement between the township and Old Tappan for dispatch services.... The previous agreement, which extended back to 2002, will expire this year. The mayor said Old Tappan and River Vale officials drew up another seven year agreement for the dispatch services.... For over 35 years, River Vale Police Department has served as the Public Safety Answering Point/911 dispatch center for Old Tappan. According to McCann, all police, fire and emergency calls for the neighboring borough are routed through the River Vale Police Department for dispatching."
  77. ^ Pascack Valley Local 206
  78. ^ Fire Department, Borough of Old Tappan. Accessed December 24, 2011.
  79. ^ District information for Old Tappan School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  80. ^ School Data for Old Tappan Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  81. ^ T. Baldwin Demarest Elementary School, Old Tappan Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  82. ^ Charles DeWolf Middle School, Old Tappan Public Schools. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  83. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Old Tappan Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  84. ^ Home page, Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 4, 2011. Accessed October 14, 2014. "Welcome to Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, home of the Golden Knights. Although our students reside in four different towns; Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood, and Old Tappan, once they arrive here they are treated as one."
  85. ^ Rockleigh Public Services, Rockleigh, New Jersey. Accessed October 14, 2014. "Rockleigh Borough is a 'sending district' in that there is no public school within the Borough, except for three special-education schools administered by Bergen County.... The Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan, a nationally ranked high school, receives older children from Rockleigh Borough."
  86. ^ Northern Valley Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 14, 2014. "Located in the upper North Eastern corner of the state, Northern Valley Regional is comprised of two high schools, Demarest and Old Tappan and the Region III special educational program that services students across the spectrum. There are seven local communities that send their students to the regional high schools: Closter, Demarest, Harrington Park, Haworth, Northvale, Norwood and Old Tappan."
  87. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  88. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 11, 2013.
  89. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 1, 2013.
  90. ^ Commuter Routes, Rockland Coaches. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  91. ^ Schedule Details: Old Tappan, NJ to New York, NY, Rockland Coaches. Accessed October 14, 2014.
  92. ^ Zeitchik, Steven. "IN PERSON; Meet Joe Fan", The New York Times, January 23, 2005. Accessed July 14, 2009.
  93. ^ Goellner, Caleb. "'The Legend of Korra' Voice Actor P.J. Byrne Talks Bending It Like Bolin (Interview)", Comics Alliance, June 18, 2012. Accessed September 18, 2012.
  94. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "Old Tappan's P.J. Byrne co-stars on new CBS series 'Intelligence'", The Record (Bergen County), January 7, 2014. Accessed January 22, 2014. "It's a great time for P.J. Byrne. On the big screen, the actor with roots in Old Tappan can be seen as one of Leonardo DiCaprio's debaucherous crew in Martin Scorsese's The Wolf of Wall Street."
  95. ^ The State of Jazz: Meet 40 More Jersey Greats, The Star-Ledger, September 28, 2004.
  96. ^ Doblin, Alfred P. "Doblin: Ferriero, The Little Flower of Old Tappan", The Record (Bergen County), September 18, 2009. Accessed December 11, 2013. "JOE FERRIERO discovered fire. Joe Ferriero discovered America. Joe Ferriero discovered a cure for the common cold. Joe Ferriero discovered Wikipedia.... On Wednesday, the Ferriero Wikipedia listing was a better read than the latest Dan Brown novel. Who knew that Old Tappan resident Joseph Ferriero, former chairman of the Bergen County Democratic Organization, a modern-day Napoleon with a penchant for Ferragamo neckties, was New Jersey’s St. Therese of Lisieux, otherwise known as The Little Flower?"
  97. ^ Raab, Selwyn. "Strange Old Man on Sullivan St.: New Mob Power", The New York Times, February 3, 1988. Accessed June 26, 2010.
  98. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "Longtime soap As the World Turns comes to a halt this week", The Record (Bergen County), September 15, 2010. Accessed April 11, 2011. "For Kelley Menighan Hensley of Old Tappan, who has played Emily Stewart since 1992, that realism took getting used to. The actress, who'd grown up on ABC soaps and had never seen ATWT, checked it out before testing for the show.... Hensley, who met her husband, actor Jon Hensley (Holden Snyder), on ATWT, came to love being part of the show."
  99. ^ Lewis, Robert A. "How We Dropped the A-Bomb", Popular Science, August 1957. Accessed June 26, 2010.
  100. ^ LaPointe, Joe. "Boy Who Helped Yankees Is a Hit Again", The New York Times, April 14, 2006. Accessed August 18, 2008. "For years, Maier avoided interviews about the incident, but he was a national story after it occurred. He was from Old Tappan, N.J., and the ticket to the game had been a present at his bar mitzvah, held a week earlier with a World Series theme."
  101. ^ Price-Brown, Laura. "Are Off-Court Issues Affecting Nets?", Newsday, December 6, 2003. Accessed April 11, 2011. "The thought of shlepping every game night from his brand-new home in Old Tappan, NJ, to Uniondale was enough to make Kenyon Martin surlier than he already ..."
  102. ^ New Jersey - Bergen County, national Register of Historic Places. Accessed November 15, 2011.

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