Oleg Shenin

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Oleg Semyonovich Shenin (Russian: Олег Семёнович Шенин; July 2, 1937 – May 28, 2009[1]) was the leader of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Shenin), which should not be confused with the larger UCP-CPSU.

Shenin was a member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union; he was also a member of the Politburo and Secretariat from 1990 to 1991. During the Soviet coup attempt of 1991, he was a member of the group of CPSU CC members who tried to regain control of the country in order to re-establish the Soviet Union.[2] He was later jailed for taking part in the events. He was given amnesty in 1994.[3]

Shenin was the founding Chairman of the Union of Communist Parties - Communist Party of the Soviet Union (UCP-CPSU) from 1993, until he broke away from the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (CPRF) in 2001, after its leader Gennady Zyuganov refused to back the creation of a united Communist Party of Russia and Belarus.[4] Zyuganov then succeeded Shenin as Chairman of the UCP-CPSU.

He was considered to be a hardline anti-Revisionist. In September 1997, he met with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il in Pyongyang.

Oleg Shenin registered as a presidential candidate for the 2008 presidential election but he was denied registration for failing to complete some paperwork correctly.[5] According to Shenin, his candidacy was rejected because he did not provide a letter from his employer; he described this as an "idiotic pretext" because he had been retired for years.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Умер Олег Шенин (in Russian). Gazeta.ru. 2009-05-28. Retrieved 2009-05-28. 
  2. ^ Vladimir Kvint and Natalia Darialova (1991-19-28). "Man in the shadows. (USSR Politburo member Oleg Shenin) (Hidden assets of the Soviet Communist Party)" (pdf). Forbes Magazine. Retrieved 2010-05-29.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  3. ^ "Oleg S. Shenin, Tried to Overthrow Gorbachev, Dies at 71". New York Times. 2009-05-29. Retrieved 2010-04-16. 
  4. ^ Natalya Krainova (2007-10-12). "Political Animal and Man of the People". The Moscow Times. Retrieved 2008-03-28. 
  5. ^ Nikolaus von Twickel (2007-12-20). "9 Independents File to Run for President". The Moscow Times. Retrieved 2008-01-02. 
  6. ^ "Why Putin falsified the Presidential elections", Northstarcompass.org, March 2008.