Olga Kryshtanovskaya

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This name uses Eastern Slavic naming customs; the patronymic is Viktorovna and the family name is Kryshtanovskaya.

Olga Viktorovna Kryshtanovskaya (Russian: О́льга Ви́кторовна Крыштано́вская; born 1954)[1] is a Russian sociologist,[2] activist and State Duma deputy from the United Russia party.[3]

Education and career[edit]

Kryshtanovskaya works for Russian Academy of Science Institute for Sociology (ru) since 1989. In 2003 she discovered that majority of former KGB officials and military personnel are heading the government. In 2005 she published her research under a title of Putin's Elite and and since 1991 have published 34 studies.[4] In 2007 she estimated that only 26% of the military personnel that are currently in Kremlin are belong to siloviki group and that this number is expected to rise up to 78%.[5][6] interview with Radio Free Europe she compared Vladimir Putin to Yuri Andropov saying that:

Andropov thought that the Communist Party had to keep power in its hands and to conduct an economic liberalization. This was the path China followed. For people in the security services, China is the ideal model. They see this as the correct course. They think that [former Russian President Boris] Yeltsin went along the wrong path, as did Gorbachev.[7]

United Russia[edit]

In 2009 she joined United Russia party and became its deputy which was followed by the foundation of ru:Отличницы party in 2010 and two years later became Putin's trustee.[1]

In 2010 she said this about Dmitry Medvedev's policies:

Medvedev might find himself without support from the bureaucracy. Politicians are bound to start thinking one fine day whether they ought to continue supporting the man who would not support them. It is not an idle threat. Consider the opposition leaders we have in Russia nowadays. All of them from Zyuganov to Nemtsov to Yavlinsky to Kasyanov are political 'exiles' if I might use the term.[8]

In 2011 she said that only 6% of Russian women are into politics while the higher education for women is over 50%.[9]

On June 12, 2012 in an inrview with Dozhd channel, she said that she will revoke her United Russia membersip and will begin to study Russian Revolution since the coutry is in that phaze according to her.[10][11]

In 2013 amid President Putin's remarks about Aleksei Navalny she said that it is Putin's attempt at making sure that the criminal justice sysatem is respected in Russia.[12] The same year she also was quoted saying in The Moscow Times that athletes in other countries of the world will try to boycott 2014 Winter Olympics if Russia will not change its stance on anti-gay laws.[13]

Personal life[edit]

She is married and have two sons.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Ольга Крыштановская" (in Russian). RIA Novosti. February 25, 2013. Archived from the original on July 2, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Putin Calls for More Responsive Government". Fox News. Associated Press. September 23, 2011. Archived from the original on February 26, 2012. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  3. ^ Thomas Balmforth (June 6, 2011). "A New Russian Women's Movement -- Or A Cynical Political Ploy?". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. Archived from the original on July 2, 2014. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  4. ^ Anatoly Medetsky (October 13, 2003). "A Researcher Walks on a Razor's Edge". The Moscow Times. Archived from the original on July 31, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  5. ^ Robert Coalson (October 15, 2007). "Russia: Why The Chekist Mind-Set Matters". Radio Free Europe. Archived from the original on June 12, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Russia: Expert Eyes Security Ties Among Siloviki". Radio Free Europe. December 20, 2006. Archived from the original on November 17, 2012. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  7. ^ Brian Whitmore (February 9, 2009). "Andropov's Ghost". Radio Free Europe. Archived from the original on July 2, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Medvedev's 'Krysha'". Radio Free Europe. October 6, 2010. Archived from the original on January 21, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Ольга Крыштановская: Необходимо активнее вовлекать женщин в политическую жизнь страны" (in Russian). United Russia. September 22, 2011. Archived from the original on July 31, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Russia's 'Revolutionary' Situation". Radio Free Europe. June 12, 2012. Archived from the original on January 11, 2014. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Sanctions Bind Russia Together, For Now". The Moscow Times. March 24, 2014. Archived from the original on August 1, 2014. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  12. ^ Natalia Antonova; Kristen Blyth (July 22, 2013). "Navalny: Out of the frying pan, into the Moscow mayoral race". The Moscow News. RIA Novosti. Archived from the original on March 1, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 
  13. ^ Natalia Antonova (August 19, 2013). "The Week in Quotes: Rooms of the Russian soul". The Moscow News. Archived from the original on August 1, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014. 

External links[edit]