Olive View – UCLA Medical Center

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Olive View – UCLA Medical Center
Los Angeles County Department of Health Services
Olive View-UCLA Medical Center logo.png
Geography
Location 14445 Olive View Dr., Sylmar, California, United States
Organization
Care system Public
Funding Government hospital
Hospital type Teaching
Affiliated university University of California, Los Angeles
Services
Beds 377
History
Founded October 27, 1920; 93 years ago (1920-10-27)
Links
Website www.uclaoliveview.org
Lists Hospitals in California

Olive View – UCLA Medical Center is a hospital, funded by Los Angeles County,[1] located in the Sylmar neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, USA. It is one of the primary healthcare delivery systems in the north San Fernando Valley, especially the area's large indigent population. Olive View is also the closest county hospital serving the Antelope Valley after High Desert Hospital was converted to an urgent care clinic in 2003.

Overview[edit]

The new 377-bed state-of-the-art replacement facility, built on the old Sylmar site, was opened on May 8, 1987. Olive View incorporated UCLA in its name, becoming Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in 1992. In May 1997, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center became a part of ValleyCare, which maintains responsibility for the care of the medically indigent, low income, uninsured residents of the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys.

Olive View-UCLA Medical Center has a strong affiliation with the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, offering residency programs in all major specialty areas as well as providing an on-campus School of Nursing. It is also a major rotation site for medical students at UCLA. "As a public sector integrated health services delivery system, the hospital's vision is to serve as a model for enhancing health and providing education to patients, staff, and the community," according to the hospital.

Olive View-UCLA Medical Center is very active in clinical research.

History[edit]

The hospital was founded on October 27, 1920, as a tuberculosis (TB) sanatorium to relieve overcrowding at County General Hospital, and when it was no longer needed for TB treatment, the facilities became an acute care hospital in 1970. In 1962, Olive View Hospital performed the first open heart surgery successfully in the San Fernando Valley, and one of the first in Southern California.

The hospital was known as Olive View Hospital before it became affiliated with the university's School of Medicine in 1970. Olive View Hospital became Olive View Medical Center, a teaching hospital and a new 888-bed hospital was dedicated in December 1970.

The hospital was severely damaged six weeks after it opened during the 6.6[2] 1971 San Fernando earthquake (February 9, 1971), which caused the collapse of the four stairwell wings, as well as the parking structure. The first floor columns of the five-story main structure nearly collapsed as well, which nearly brought down the entire structure. The building was damaged beyond repair, and demolished in 1973. For the next sixteen years, Olive View served its patients through an interim facility at MidValley in Van Nuys.

The rebuilt Olive View UCLA Medical Center was opened in 1987.

In June, 1992, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approves contracts that allow postgraduate physicians from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to work at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center. Physicians can now receive training not available at Cedars-Sinai. Olive View-UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar is provided with three additional doctors at a cost to the county of $9,000 a month.[1]

The 2008 Sayre Fire caused damage to several outbuildings, and an evacuation of the intensive care patients from the hospital.

In February, 2012, psychiatric emergency service at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center is so overcrowded, that mentally ill patients sleep on mattresses on the floor.[2]

In June, 2012, patients with the least urgent medical conditions wait up to 24 hours to be seen. The Supreme Court upholds healthcare reform. Most of Olive View's poorest patients (primarily of Hispanic ethnicity) will now be eligible for medical coverage.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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