Ollam

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

An ollam or ollamh (anglicised as ollave or ollav), in early Irish Literature, is a member of the highest rank of fili. The term is used to refer to the highest member of any group: thus an ollam brithem would be the highest rank of judge and an ollam rí would be the highest rank of king. Ollav was also applied to a Druidic rank; meaning much the same as "professor," or person of great learning. [1] Typically the Ollav/ollam was endowed with a distinction equal to that of a king and could therefore wear six colours.

There was an official post in ancient Ireland called the " Ollam" or "Ard Ollam" or Chief Ollam of Ireland. The holder of the post had a standing equal to the High King of Ireland. One of the most famous Ollav/Ollam of Ireland was Ollav Fala, eighteenth descendant of Eremon circa 1000 B.C. [2]

Ollamh Fodhla, meaning "great teacher," was used to designate various prominent men throughout history.

Literary fosterage[edit]

In Ancient Ireland, ollams taught children either for payment or for no compensation.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sacred text archives". Internet Sacred Text Archives. Retrieved 2013-09-28. 
  2. ^ "Sacred text archives". Internet Sacred Text Archives. Retrieved 2013-09-28. 
  3. ^ "Fosterage in Ancient Ireland". Library Ireland. Retrieved 2012-06-16.