Olutoyin Augustus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Olutoyin Augustus
Personal information
Born (1979-12-24) 24 December 1979 (age 34)
Oyo, Nigeria

Olutoyin "Toyin" Augustus (born 24 December 1979) is a Nigerian hurdler who competes in the 100 metres hurdles.

She began her career with a win at the African Championships in Athletics in 2006, easily beating the opposition to the 100 m hurdles title. She went on to represent Africa at the 2006 IAAF World Cup, where she finished in eighth place. In 2007 she added the All-Africa Games title to her continental one, holding off a challenge from compatriot Jessica Ohanaja. She began competing at the global level, making appearances at the 2007 World Championships, 2008 IAAF World Indoor Championships and the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, but she did not get past the heats stage at any of the events. She faced strong competition at continental level also, as Fatmata Fofanah took the 100 m hurdles title at the 2008 African Championships, leaving Augustus to settle for the silver medal.

She ran at the 2009 World Championships in Athletics, taking part in the hurdles competition as well as the women's 4×100 metres relay race for Nigeria. She reached the semi-final stage in the hurdles but was later disqualified and finished 16th overall in the sprint relay event.At the Berlin World Championships, Augustus was subject to a blood and urine test for the WADA. Her blood sample had no documented negative findings, but her urine sample tested positive for abnormal high levels of testosterone. The IAAF Doctor’s opinion stated that “This finding could be compatible with an administration of testosterone and/or related prohormones…”

A series of examinations and tests conducted by a MD specialist in gynecology and reproductive endocrinology at the USC (University of Southern California) Medical Hospital found that Augustus had multiple ovarian cysts which the doctor linked to a disorder called Polycystic Ovary Syndrome or PCOS. PCOS is a metabolic dysfunction causing hormonal disruptions and elevated DHEA, a precursor hormone to other reproductive hormones such as testosterone.

To contest the positive doping test and defend her case, Augustus (a United States resident) was required to attend the B sample testing conducted in Germany. If the B sample was also positive, she would then have to fly to Nigeria to present her case to a committee appointed by her country’s athletic federation. This committee would be the ruling body on her case. Although the doctor at USC concluded that the PCOS disorder caused the elevated DHEA levels in Augustus’ urine sample, these findings were rejected by the Nigerian committee. Augustus was ordered to serve the two year mandatory ban from IAAF sanctioned athletics competitions.

Augustus’ case was under review for several months, coming to a close in 2010. During this period Augustus continued to compete internationally, but withdrew from a competition in Belgium after notification that her case was rejected. Her ban was extended until February 2012 after it discovered that she had competed while ineligible.[1]

Toyin has recently been featured in various television spots for Xfinity 3D, Are You Smarter Than A 5th Grader? and most notably NCAA where she and other student athletes debunk the myth of the dumb jock stigma.[2]

Her personal best time is 12.85 seconds, achieved in 2009 in Nantes.

Achievements[edit]

Year Competition Venue Position Event
2006 African Championships Bambous, Mauritius 1st 100 m hurdles
IAAF World Cup Athens, Greece 8th 100 m hurdles
2007 All-Africa Games Algiers, Algeria 1st 100 m hurdles
World Championships Osaka, Japan 6th (heats) 100 m hurdles
2008 World Indoor Championships Valencia, Spain 5th (heats) 60 m hurdles
African Championships Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 2nd 100 m hurdles
Summer Olympics Beijing, China 7th (heats) 100 m hurdles
2009 World Championships Berlin, Germany 6th (semis) 100 m hurdles
6th (heats) 4×100 m relay

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IAAF Newsletter Edition 112. IAAF (2010-04-27). Retrieved on 2010-04-27.
  2. ^ [1]. "NCAA Pushes Back on Dumb Jock Myth" National Collegiate Athletic Association (2011-03-18). Retrieved on 2011-03-27.

External links[edit]