Olympus OM system

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The Olympus OM System (O = Olympus, M = Maitani) was a line of 35mm single-lens reflex cameras, lenses and accessories sold by Olympus between 1972 and 2002 (some accessories were sold until early 2003).

The system was introduced by Olympus in 1972, more than a decade after Nikon, Canon, and other manufacturers had established their own SLR ranges. The range was designed by Yoshihisa Maitani, chief designer for Olympus, and his staff. The nucleus of the system was a series of compact bodies divided into a professional series and a later consumer-oriented series. The first model introduced was the all-mechanical M-1, which after pressure from Leica was renamed OM-1. The body included a full aperture TTL CdS exposure meter and a bayonet lens mount of relatively large diameter. By the end of the 1970s it was joined by the semi automatic OM-2 and consumer oriented OM-10. Olympus continued the naming pattern with the professional OM-3 and OM-4, and the consumer-level OM-20, OM-30, and OM-40. The system was accompanied by a series of Zuiko-branded lenses, as well as a generous selection of accessories. The majority of OM bodies and lenses were manual focus only; the OM-707 of 1986 was the only true autofocus model.

Camera models[edit]

Olympus produced a wide variety of OM camera models over the years. These were divided into two distinct series. Cameras with single-digit model numbers were the professional series, optimized for features and ruggedness rather than ease of use. Two-digit (or more) model numbers, or letters, meant a consumer camera designed for ease of use.

All the consumer-grade models were discontinued after 1992, since the market for manual focus cameras in this segment had dried up. The consumer-grade line returned in 1997 with the Cosina-sourced OM-2000 model. Professional and advanced amateur demand for the high-end models continued, and they were produced until 2002 along with the consumer-grade OM-2000.[1]

Chronology of OM-system cameras[2]
1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s
Model 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2
M-1
OM-1
OM-1 MD
OM-1N
OM-2
OM-2N
OM-2S/SP
OM-3
OM-3Ti
OM-4
OM-4T/Ti chrome
OM-4T/Ti black
OM-10
OM-10 Quartz
OM-20 (OM-G)
OM-30(OM-F)
OM-40 (OM-PC)
OM-77AF (OM-707)
OM-88 (OM-101)
OM-2000

Professional cameras[edit]

OM-1[edit]

Main article: Olympus OM-1

The Olympus OM-1 is a manually operated 35 mm single-lens reflex camera forming the ground of the OM system introduced in 1972, at first called the Olympus M-1, Leica disputed this designation and it was changed to OM. It was designed by a team led by the late Yoshihisa Maitani with a through-the-lens exposure meter controlling a needle visible in the viewfinder. It was noted for its reduction of size, weight and noise. These features were essentially retained on later models. One feature unique to the OM1 compared to the rest of the OM system was its manual mirror lock-up making it ideal for astrophotography and macrophotography.

OM-2[edit]

Main article: Olympus OM-2

Introduced in 1975, the Olympus OM-2 was a semi automatic, aperture priority camera based on the OM-1 body, retaining compatibility with accessories and lenses. It boasts automatic through-the-lens (TTL) off-the-film (OTF) metering: exposure was considered very accurate, calculated by the measured light reflected off the surface of the shutter and/or the film surface during the actual exposure. The camera also offered a manual light-meter mode, as in the OM-1. It also introduces the integration of electronic flash into the exposure system via the same TTL exposure system.

OM-3[edit]

Main article: Olympus OM-3

The OM-3 was an updated version of the OM-1, a manual camera without automatic exposure modes, and an entirely mechanical shutter. It featured a multi-spot metering system (which it shared with the OM-4) in addition to the centre weighted metering on the earlier body. It also featured an LCD display similar to the OM-4 which could be illuminated in low light. Its main advantage over the OM-4 was its ability to operate without batteries due to its mechanical nature. Batteries were only needed for the multi spot meter and LCD display. It lacked a self-timer however.

In 1995, nine years after the OM-3 was discontinued, the OM-3Ti was released. It shared the improvements over the OM-3 that the OM-4Ti held over the OM-4.

OM-4[edit]

Main article: Olympus OM-4

The Olympus OM-4, an improved version of the OM-2, was manufactured from 1983 to 1987 introduced at US$685 list price for the body alone. It was a battery powered electromechanically controlled manual focus SLR with manual exposure control or aperture priority autoexposure. It used a horizontal cloth focal plane shutter with a speed range of 240 to 1/2000th second plus bulb and flash X-sync of 1/60th second.

It was the first camera with a built-in spot meter [of a narrow angle, see Canon FTb] (2% of view; 3.3˚ with 50 mm lens) and could measure eight individual spots and average them. The light meter used a dual concentric segmented silicon photo diode to provide spot or centerweighted readings. It used a graduated linear LCD display for the shutter speed at the bottom of the viewfinder to precisely indicate its readings versus the actual camera settings instead of a needle.

In 1986 it was improved to a tougher OM-4Ti (OM-4T in USA) version, with titanium top and bottom plates, improved weatherproofing and high-speed sync with the flash staying on during the entire shutter operation, losing the light hidden by the curtains. This last version was finally discontinued in 2002.

Consumer-grade cameras[edit]

OM-10[edit]

Main article: Olympus OM-10

The OM-10 hit the markets in June 1979 at the same time as the OM-2N. The camera is a 35mm focal-plane shutter aperture priority AE SLR camera with an electronic shutter. Only aperture priority AE was available with the camera unless the optional manual exposure adapter was installed which allowed the setting of shutters speeds between 1 second and 1/1000 of a second (bulb mode is also available on the camera). The camera is equipped with a fixed pentaprism viewfinder which contains an LED exposure indicator. The finder coverage was measured to be 93%.

Exposure control is based on aperture priority AE or center-weighted light metering. Film speeds of the camera range from ASA 25 to ASA 1600. Film winding is done by using the film wind lever located on the top right of the camera. Film rewinding is done manually using the film rewind crank located above the film canister on the top left of the camera. The camera body measures 136 × 83 × 50 mm and weighs approximately 430 grams (15 oz).

OM-20[edit]

The OM-20 (sold in the United States as the OM-G) was essentially a refinement of the OM-10, replacing that model's rather tricky mode switch with one that was easier to use. The OM-20 also had a built-in shutter speed dial and a mode display in the view finder as well as a few more minor design improvements.

OM-30[edit]

Essentially an OM-20 with auto-focus capability. With a normal lens there are lights in the view finder to help aid the user with focusing, a special autofocus lens was also available at the time but is now very rare.

OM-40[edit]

A further refinement of the OM-20 with features that are more of interest to most serious photographers. It has a lighter slightly more modern and ergonomic body design. It also had an early form of Matrix metering and full mirror lock-up when the self-timer is switched on, a feature still rarely found in non-high end cameras.

Also known in some markets as the OM-PC, the OM-40 had a program mode that automated the selection of both the aperture and the shutter speed.

OM-2000[edit]

Essentially a Cosina-made SLR with an Olympus badge, not considered by Olympus "die-hard fans" to be a true OM camera.

The OM-2000 has a mechanical vertical shutter as opposed to the traditional OM cameras with their horizontal shutter. This allows the OM-2000 to synchronize an electronic flash at 1/125th of a second. Many photographers find this capability an advantage for the use of "fill flash" techniques in daylight.

Prototype cameras[edit]

OM-X[edit]

During the design study of the OM-1, the Olympus design team led by Yoshihisa Maitani had worked on a completely modular camera, like a 35 mm Hasselblad. This camera was built as a prototype, and was called the OM-X.[3]

Lenses[edit]

OM system lenses.

The OM Series lenses have the aperture control located on the lens barrel on the opposite side of the focusing ring from the mount. This was done to move it away from the shutter speed control, which is a ring on the camera body immediately behind the lens mount. They also feature a depth of field preview button on the lens itself, as opposed to most other SLR camera systems in which the button is placed on the camera body.

Olympus OM - Canon EOS adapter.

The OM lens is designed to sit 46 mm (as measured from the front of the aluminium ring on which the serial number is stamped) from the film onto which it projects, further away than many other lens systems. The combination of on-lens aperture control and this extra distance make OM lenses adaptable with full (manual) functionality to a variety of other camera systems – including the ubiquitous Canon EOS line – by using a specialized adapter.

Zuiko lenses specifications[4]
Lens Angle of view Elements – Groups Diaphragm Aperture range Closest focus Smallest field Focusing Weight Length Diameter Hood Filter
8 mm F2.8 Fisheye 180° (circle) 11–7 Auto 2.8–22 0.2 m - Straight helicoid 640 g 82 mm 102 mm Not necessary Built-in (L39,Y48, O56,R60)
16 mm F3.5 Fisheye 180° 11–8 Auto 3.5–22 0.2 m - Straight helicoid 180 g 31 mm 59 mm Not necessary Built-in

(L39,Y48, O56)

18 mm F3.5 100° 11–9 Auto 3.5–16 0.25 m 30×20 cm Straight helicoid 250 g 42 mm 62 mm 49 mm Adapter Ring 49→72 72 mm Screw-in (w.Adapter Ring 49→72)
21 mm F2 92° 11–9 Auto 2–16 0.2 m 21×14 cm Straight helicoid 250 g 43.5 mm 60 mm 55 mm Screw-in [57 mm Slide-on] 55 mm Screw-in
21 mm F3.5 92° 7–7 Auto 3.5–16 0.2 m 21×14 cm Straight helicoid 180 g 31 mm 59 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
24 mm F2 84° 10–8 Auto 2–16 0.25 m 23×15 cm Straight helicoid 280 g 48 mm 60 mm 55 mm Screw-in 55 mm Screw-in
24 mm F2.8 84° 8–7 Auto 2.8–16 0.25 m 23×15 cm Straight helicoid 180 g 31 m 59 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
24 mm F3.5 Shift 84° (100° at max. shift) 12-10 Manual 3.5–22 0.35 m 36×24 cm Rotating cam(Inner focus) 510 g 75 mm 84 mm Fixed Built-in (neutral, Y48,O56, R60)
28 mm F2 75° 9–8 Auto 2–16 0.3 m 27×18 cm Straight helicoid 250 g 43 mm 60 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
28 mm F2.8 75° 6–6 Auto 2.8–22 0.3 m 18×27 cm Straight helicoid 170 g 32 mm 60 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
28 mm F3.5 75° 7–7 Auto 3.5–16 0.3 m 18×27 cm Straight helicoid 180 g 31 mm 59 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
35 mm F2 63° 8–7 Auto 2–16 0.3 m 21×14 cm Straight helicoid 240 g 42 mm 60 mm 55 mm Screw-in 55 mm Screw-in
35 mm F2.8 63° 7–6 Auto 2.8–16 0.3 m 21×14 cm Straight helicoid 180 g 33 mm 59 mm 51 mm Slide-on 49 mm Screw-in
35 mm F2.8 Shift 63° (83° at max. shift) 8–7 Manual 2.8–22 0.3 m 21×14 cm Straigh helicoid 310 g 58 mm 68 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
40 mm F2 56° 6–6 Auto 2–16 0.3 m 18×12 cm Straight helicoid 140 g 25 mm 60 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm

Screw-in

50 mm F1.2 47° 7–6 Auto 1.2–16 0.45 m 24×16 cm Straight helicoid 285 g 43 mm 65 mm 51 mm Slide-on 49 mm Screw-in
50 mm F1.4 47° 7–6 Auto 1.4–16 0.45 m 24×16 cm Straight helicoid 230 g 36 mm [40 mm] 60 mm 51 mm Slide-on 49 mm Screw-in
50 mm F1.8 47° 6–5

[6–4]

Auto 1.8–16 0.45 m 24×16 cm Straight helicoid 170 g [165 g] 31 mm [32 mm] 59 mm [61 mm] 51 mm Slide-on 49 mm Screw-in
50 mm F2Macro 47° 9–7 Auto 2–16 0.24 m 7.2×4.8 cm Straight helicoid 320 g 55 mm 69 mm Not necessary 55 mm Screw-in
50 mm F3.5Macro 47° 5–4 Auto 3.5–22 0.23 m 7.2×4.8 cm Straight helicoid 200 g 40 mm 60 mm Not necessary 49 mm Screw-in
55 mm F1.2 43° 7–6 Auto 1.2–16 0.45 m 23×15 cm Straight helicoid 310 g 47 mm 65 mm 57 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
85 mm F2 29° 6–4

[5–4]

Auto 2–16 0.85 m 25×17 cm Straight helicoid 260 g 46 mm 60 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
90 mm F2Macro 27° 9–9 Auto 2–22 0.4 m 7.2×4.8 cm Straight helicoid 550 g 71 mm 72 mm 57 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
100 mm F2 24° 7–6 Auto 2–22 0.7 m 18×12 cm Straight helicoid 520 g 72 mm 70 mm Built-in 55 mm Screw-in
100 mm F2.8 24° 5–5 Auto 2.8–22 1m 29×19 cm Straight helicoid 230 g 48 mm 60 mm 49 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
135 mm F2.8 18° 5–5 Auto 2.8–22 1.5 m 32×21 cm Straight helicoid 360 g 80 mm 61 mm Built-in 55 mm Screw-in
135 mm F3.5 18° 5–4 Auto 3.5–22 1.5 m 32×21 cm Straight helicoid 290 g 73 mm 60 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
180 mm F2 14° 10–8 Auto 2–22 1.6 m 25×17 cm Rotating cam (Inner focus) 1,900 g 174 mm 113 mm Built-in 100 mm Screw-in
180 mm F2.8 14° 5–5 Auto 2.8–32 2 m 32×21 cm Straight helicoid 700 g 124 mm 80 mm Built-in 72 mm Screw-in
200 mm F4 12° 5–4 Auto 4–32 2.5 m 36×24 cm Straight helicoid 510 g 127 mm 67 mm Built-in 55 mm Screw-in
200 mm F5 12° 6–5 Auto 5–32 2.5 m 36×25 cm Straight helicoid 380 g 105 mm 62 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
250 mm F2 10° 12–9 Auto 2–22 2.2 m 25×17 cm Rotating cam (Inner focus) 3,900 g 246 mm 142 mm Built-in Slip-in (46 mm rear filter)
300 mm F4.5 6–4 Auto 4.5–32 3.5 m 33×22 cm Straight helicoid 1,100 g (1,020 g without tripod collar) 181 mm 80 mm Built-in 72 mm

Screw-in

350 mm F2.8 9–7 Auto 2.8–32 3 m 25×17 cm Rotating cam (Inner focus) 3,900 g 280 mm 142 mm Built-in Slip-in (46 mm rear filter)
400 mm F6.3 5–5 Auto 6.3–32 5 m 36×24 cm Straight helicoid 1,300 g 255 mm 80 mm Built-in 72 mm Screw-in
500 mm F8Reflex 5–2 - Single aperture of F8 4 m 28×19 cm Straight helicoid 590 g 97 mm 81 mm Built-in 72 mm Screw-in
600 mm F6.5 6–4 Auto 6.5–32 11 m 55×37 cm Rack and pinion 2,800 g 377 mm 110 mm Built-in 100 mm Screw-in
1000 mm F11 2.5° 5–5 Auto 11–45 30 m 98×65 cm Rack and pinion 4,000 g [4,150 g] 662 mm 110 mm Built-in 100 mm Screw-in
28–48 mm F4 75°–49° 8–8 Auto 4–22 0.65 m 74×49 cm (28 mm) 46×31 cm (48 mm) Rotating helicoid 300 g 54 mm (at 48 mm setting) 65 mm 55 mm Screw-in 49 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F3.5–4.5 63°–34° 9–8 Auto 3.5–22 0.45 m 21.7×14.5 cm (close focus, 70 mm) Rotating helicoid 190 g 51 mm 62 mm 51 mm Slip-on 49 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F3.5–4.8 63°–34° 7–7 Auto 3.5–22 (35 mm) 4.8–32 (70 mm) 0.4 m 22×15 cm Straight helicoid 185 g 65 mm 63 mm 52 mm Screw-in 52 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F3.6 63°–34° 10–8 Auto 3.6–22 0.8 m 72×48 cm (35 mm) 37.5×25 cm (70 mm) Straight helicoid 400 g 74 mm 67 mm 60 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F4 64°–34° 7–7 Auto 4–22 0.75 m 72×48 cm (35 mm) 36×24 cm (70 mm) Straight helicoid 385 g 71 mm 69 mm 57 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F4 Auto Focus 63°–34° 9–8 Auto 4–22 0.75 m 72×48 cm (35 mm) 36×24 cm (70 mm) Rotating helicoid 550 g (without batteries) 70 mm 92 mm 55 mm Screw-in 55 mm Screw-in
35–80 mm F2.8 63°–30° 16–14 Auto 2.8–22 0.6 m 62×41 cm (35 mm) 31×20 cm (80 mm) rotating focusing helicoid, rotating cam zoomring 650 g 99 mm 69 mm Bayonet mount 62 mm Screw-in
35–105 mm F3.5–4.5 63°–23° 16–12 Auto 3.5–22 (35 mm) 4.5–22 (105 mm) 1.5 m (0.31 m at close focus) 129×86 cm (35 mm) 45×30 cm (105 mm) close focus: 18×12 cm (35 mm) 25×17 cm (105 mm) rotating focusing helicoid and push-pull zoomring 470 g 85 mm 64 mm 55 mm Screw-in 55 mm Screw-in
50–250 mm F5 47°–10° 13–10 Auto 5–32 1.80 m (1.53 m at 250 mm, close focus) 103×69 cm (50 mm) 22×14 cm (250 mm) rotating focusing helicoid and push-pull zoomring 780 g 140 mm 72 mm Built-in 55 mm Screw-in
65–200 mm F4 37°–12° 14–11 Auto 4–32 1.2 m (0.85 m at close focus, 200 mm) 48×32 cm (65 mm) 17×11 cm (200 mm) 12×8 cm (200 mm, close focus) rotating focusing helicoid and push-pull zoomring 730 g 147 mm 71 mm Built-in 55 mm Screw-in
70–210 mm F4.5–5.6 34°–11° 10–7 Auto 4.5–22 (70 mm) 5.6–28 (210 mm) 1.14 m  ? Straight helicoid 335 g 103 mm 63 mm 52 mm Screw-in 52 mm Screw-in
75–150 mm F4 32°–16° 15–11 Auto 4–22 1.6 m 64×42 cm (75 mm) 32×21 cm (150 mm) Revolving helicoid 440 g 115 mm 63 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
85–250 mm F5 29°–10° 15–11 Auto 5–32 2 m 66–44 cm (85 mm) 23×15 cm (250 mm) Revolving helicoid 890 g 196 mm 70 mm Built-in 55 mm Screw-in
100–200 mm F5 24°–12° 9–6 Auto 5–32 2.4 m 69×46 cm (100 mm) 37×25 cm (200 mm) rotating focusing helicoid and push-pull zoomring 570 g 148 mm 63 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
20 mm F2 9° at highest magnifi-cation 6–4 Auto 2–16 - 0.86×0.57 cm (4.2×) 0.26×0.18 cm (13.6×) with Auto Bellows, 65–116, Auto Extension Tube 14, 15; fine focusing straight helicoid built-in 170 g 46 mm 60 mm not necessary -
20 mm F3.5 9° at highest magnifi-cation 4–3 Manual 3.5–16 - 0.84×0.56 cm (4.3×) 0.29×0.19 cm (12.4×) with Auto Bellows 70 g 20 mm 32 mm Not necessary 21 mm Slide-on
38 mm F2.8 9° athighest magnifi-cation 6–4 Auto 2.8–22 - 0.21×0.14 cm (1.7×) 0.54×0.36 cm (6.7×) with Auto Bellows, 65–116, Auto Extension Tube 14, 15; fine focusing straight helicoid built-in. 170 g 46 mm 60 mm Not necessary -
38 mm F3.5 9° at highest magnification 5–4 Manual 3.5–16 - 0.20×0.13 cm (1.8×) 0.59×0.39 cm (6.1×) with Auto Bellows 90 g 28 mm 43 mm Not necessary 32 mm Slide-on
80 mm F4 (Manual) 9° at highest magnifi-cation 6–4 Manual 4–22 - 7.20×4.80 cm (2.3×) 1.80×1.20 cm (2.0×) with Auto Bellows 200 g 46 mm 59 mm Not necessary 49 mm Screw-in
80 mm F4 (Auto) 9° athighest magnifi-cation 6–4 Auto 4–32 0.23 m 7.20×4.80 cm (2.3×) 1.80×1.20 cm (2.0×) with Auto Bellows, 65–116; fine focusing straight helicoid built-in 170 g 33 mm 60 mm not necessary 49 mm Screw-in
135 mm F4.5 18° 5–4 Auto 4.5–45 0.6 m 7.2×4.8 cm with Auto Bellows, 65–116; fine focusing straight helicoid built-in 320 g 47 mm 60 mm 57 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
24 mm F2.8AF 84° 8–7 Automatic control on camerabody 2.8–22 0.25 m 24×16 cm Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 170 g 32 mm 62 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
28 mm F2.8AF 75° 6–6 Automatic control on camera body 2.8–22 0.3 m 27×18 cm Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 170 g 32 mm 62 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
50 mm F1.8AF 47° 6–5 Automatic control on camera body 1.8–22 0.45 m 24×16 cm Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 170 g 32 mm 62 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
50 mm F2PF 47° 6–4 Automatic control on camera body 2–22 0.45 m 24×16 cm Driven by PF coupler on camera body 150 g 37 mm 64 mm Slide-on 49 mm

Screw-in

50 mm F2.8AF Macro 47° 8–7 Automatic controlon camera body 2.8–32 0.2 m 3.6×2.4 cm Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 340 g 57 mm 66 mm Built-in 49 mm Screw-in
28–85 mm F3.5–4.5AF 75°–29° 14–11 Automatic control on camera body 3.5–22 (28 mm) 4.5–27 (85 mm) 0.8 m (at close focus: 0.6 m) 85×57 cm (28 mm) 22×15 cm (85 mm) Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 480 g 84 mm 69 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F3.5–4.5AF 63°–34° 9–8 Automatic control on camera body 3.5–22 (35 mm) 4.5–32 (70 mm) 0.75 m (at close focus: 0.45 m) 40.4×27 cm (35 mm) 21.7×14.5 cm (70 mm, close focus) Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 250 g 53 mm 69 mm Slide-on 49 mm Screw-in
35–70 mm F3.5–4.5PF 63°–34° 9–8 Automatic control on camera body 3.5–22 (35 mm) 4.5–32 (70 mm) 0.75 m (at close focus 0.45 m) 40.4×27 cm (35 mm) 21.7×14.5 cm (70 mm, close focus) Driven by PF coupler on camera body 250 g 53 mm 69 mm Slide-on 49 mm Screw-in
35–105 mm F3.5–4.5AF 63°–23° 14–13 Automatic control on camera body 3.5–22 (35 mm) 4.5–27 (105 mm) 1.5 m (at close focus: 0.85 m) 129×86 cm (35 mm) 22×14 cm (105 mm, close focus) Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 460 g 84 mm 69 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in
70–210 mm F3.5–4.5AF 34°–11° 12–9 Automatic control on camera body 3.5–22 (70 mm) 4.5–32 (210 mm) 1.5 m (at close focus: 1.35 m) 52×34 cm (70 mm) 18×12 cm (210 mm, close focus) Driven by AF/PF coupler on camera body 790 g 125 mm 76 mm Slide-on 55 mm Screw-in

Prototype lenses[edit]

Manual Zuiko lenses that were never marketed:

  • 18 mm/f3.5, prototype of 18 mm/f3.5, L.zuiko with 12 elements 10 group, fixed 72 mm thread
  • 50 mm/f2 pancake, prototype of 40 mm/f2 pancake
  • 85 mm/f1.4, prototype, with GRIN (GRadient INdex of Refraction) elements
  • 160 mm/f3.5, prototype
  • 300 mm/f6.3, prototype
  • 400 mm/f4.5, prototype
  • 500 mm/f5.6, prototype
  • 800 mm/f9, prototype
  • 1200 mm/f14, prototype
  • 24–40 mm/f4, prototype[5]
  • 90–250 mm prototype of 85–250/5

Accessories[edit]

Being a system, Olympus made numerous accessories for professional portrait, photo journalism, sport photography and scientific photography.[6]

  • motor drives and exchangeable camera back for 250 exposures
  • lighting: dedicated flashes, shoes, cords, connectors, power sources, adapters and filters
  • interchangeable focusing screens instead of bulkier exchangeable finders
  • macrophotography: extension tubes, stands & bases, lightings and accessories
  • microphotography: systems and connecting, focusing, automatic and manual exposure units
  • technical photograph: data recording backs, endoscope and astrophotography adapters
  • cases, grips, cable release, battery holders

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ""OM system" 35 mm single lens reflex cameras sales terminated" (Press release). Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. January 17, 2002. Retrieved 2006-08-17. 
  2. ^ Hawkins, R. Lee (2003-08-11). "What years were the various OM cameras produced?". Olympus OM SLR FAQ. Retrieved 2006-08-17. 
  3. ^ Kouichi Akagi. "interview with Yoshihisa Maitani". Asahi Camera magazine (March 2002). Archived from the original on 2009-10-21. Retrieved 2006-08-16. 
  4. ^ Unofficial Olympus OM Sales Information File, Hans van Veluwen
  5. ^ http://www.cogitech.ca/photos/24-40/index.html
  6. ^ Olympus OM-1(n) & OM-2 (n) SLR cameras, Rick Oleson, Bruce hamm, Simon Evans & Mark Dapoz; Photography in Malaysia

External links[edit]