Omicron Tauri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
ο Tauri
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Taurus
Right ascension 03h 24m 48.79796s[1]
Declination +09° 01′ 43.9489″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) +4.875 ± 0.012[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type B2 V[2]
U−B color index −0.768 ± 0.005[2]
B−V color index −0.145 ± 0.006[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) –21.0 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: –67.04 ± 1.03[1] mas/yr
Dec.: –78.04 ± 1.02[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 11.21 ± 0.87[1] mas
Distance 290 ± 20 ly
(89 ± 7 pc)
Details
Surface gravity (log g) 4.15 ± 0.07[2] cgs
Temperature 20,700 ± 200[2] K
Rotational velocity (v sin i) 25 ± 2[2] km/s
Other designations
1 Tauri, BD+08 511, FK5 121, HD 21120, HIP 15900, HR 1030, SAO 111172

Omicron Tauri (ο Tau, ο Tauri) is a star in the constellation Taurus. Omicron Tauri is a yellow G-type giant with an apparent magnitude of +3.61. This star has three times the mass of the Sun and fifteen[3] to eighteen times the Sun's radius. Based on the latter, interferometry-measured radius, it is rotating once every 533 days.[4] It is approximately 212 light years from Earth and is radiating 155 times the luminosity of the Sun.[5]

This is a binary star system with the two components orbiting each other over a period of 1,655 days at an eccentricity of 0.263.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.  Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Nieva, M.-F. (February 2013), "Temperature, gravity, and bolometric correction scales for non-supergiant OB stars", Astronomy & Astrophysics 550: A26, arXiv:1212.0928, Bibcode:2013A&A...550A..26N, doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219677. 
  3. ^ da Silva, L. et al. (November 2006), "Basic physical parameters of a selected sample of evolved stars", Astronomy and Astrophysics 458 (2): 609–623, arXiv:astro-ph/0608160, Bibcode:2006A&A...458..609D, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20065105 
  4. ^ Setiawan, J. et al. (July 2004), "Precise radial velocity measurements of G and K giants. Multiple systems and variability trend along the Red Giant Branch", Astronomy and Astrophysics 421: 241–254, Bibcode:2004A&A...421..241S, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20041042-1 
  5. ^ Mallik, Sushma V. (December 1999), "Lithium abundance and mass", Astronomy and Astrophysics 352: 495–507, Bibcode:1999A&A...352..495M 
  6. ^ Lynds, Beverly T. (May 1957), "The Orbits of the Spectroscopic Binaries Omicron Tauri, Xi Cancri, and Mu Ursae Majories", Astrophysical Journal 125: 712, Bibcode:1957ApJ...125..712J, doi:10.1086/146345 

External links[edit]