On the Issues

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For the feminist magazine, see On the Issues (magazine).

On the Issues or OnTheIssues is an American non-partisan, non-profit organization providing information to voters about candidates, primarily via their web site.[1] The organization was started in 1996, went non-profit in 2000, and is currently run primarily by volunteers.[2]

The owner and CEO of On the Issues is Dr. Naomi Lichtenberg. The editor-in-chief and content manager is Jesse Gordon. The organization is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Missoula, Montana.[3]

The organization's stated mission is to help voters pick candidates "based on issues rather than on personalities and popularity." They obtain their information from newspapers, speeches, press releases, book excerpts, House and Senate voting records, Congressional bill sponsorships, political affiliations and ratings, and campaign websites from the Internet.[3]

OnTheIssues has a reputation for helping voters to make educated decisions.[4] Among other things, they offer an online quiz "that aims to bring together the politically compatible – a wonk's version of an online dating service."[5] The "VoteMatch Quiz" has 20 questions, and matches users' answers against candidates for president and for Congress. The quiz also assigns a "political philosophy" by analyzing the answers on social issues versus economic issues.

The OnTheIssues website is characterized by heavy content and a lack of fancy technical features: an "information-rich, plain-jane site," according to U.S. News and World Report.[6] The website contains 75,000 pages covering about 1,000 incumbents and challengers,[7] as of early 2014.

On the Issues collaborated with Americans Elect to prepare for the AmericansElect.org convention in June 2012 by preparing platforms of questions for members of Congress, governors, mayors, and numerous other possible nominees.[8] As with the VoteMatch quiz, the AmericansElect platforms are inferred from voting records, bill sponsorships, and other public statements.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ OnTheIssues.org. Retrieved May 18, 2008.
  2. ^ "Political non-profit organizer" (YouTube interview with Jesse Gordon of OnTheIssues.org). Retrieved 2008-05-18.
  3. ^ a b "About", On The Issues. Retrieved May 18, 2008.
  4. ^ Elder, Jeff and Paynter, Marion. Web's many offerings are a political potpourri, Knight-Ridder via Baltimore Sun (2004-09-16): "There are excellent nonpartisan sites that can help you reach an educated decision on issues and races. You might start with www.OnTheIssues.org...." Retrieved May 18, 2008.
  5. ^ Calvan, Bobby. "Political matches made in cyberspace: Online 'dating games' aim to help voters find compatible candidates", Sacramento Bee (January 24, 2008). Retrieved May 18, 2008.
  6. ^ "Review of www.govote.com (OnTheIssues' VoteMatch quiz)". 2000-01-31. 
  7. ^ "OnTheIssues.org Q & A: In preparation for Software Freedom Day, The Sunlight Foundation panel on government transparency". 2013-09-21. 
  8. ^ "Americans Elect could put Buddy Roemer on presidential ballot". 2011-11-25. 

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