One City Center (St. Louis)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
One City Center
OneCityCenterStLouisMO.jpg
General information
Status Complete
Type Office
Location 515 North 6th Street, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Coordinates 38°37′49″N 90°11′24″W / 38.6303°N 90.1899°W / 38.6303; -90.1899Coordinates: 38°37′49″N 90°11′24″W / 38.6303°N 90.1899°W / 38.6303; -90.1899
Height
Roof 375 feet (114 m)
Technical details
Floor count 25

One City Center (also called 600 Washington, St. Louis Centre, and sometimes spelled One City Centre) is an office tower complex and former shopping mall in St. Louis, Missouri.

The mall portion converted into a parking garage in 2010.

The 25-story office tower is the ninth-tallest habitable building in St. Louis at a height of 375 feet (114 m).[1] The mall itself is only four stories, however, with a green, white, and glass façade. When the mall opened in 1985, St. Louis Centre was the largest urban shopping mall in the United States, with over 150 stores with 20 restaurants in 1,500,000 square feet (140,000 m2).[1][2][3][4] The $95 million[3] complex was originally to be developed by the May Company and called May Mall, but development for the mall was given to the Simon Property Group.

St. Louis Centre opened in 1985, with anchor stores Famous-Barr at one end and Dillard's at the other. The anchor location of Famous-Barr also contained that company's corporate offices, and the corporate headquarters of the May Company. The Dillard's location was once the flagship, and headquarters of Stix, Baer, Fuller, with that chain being sold to Dillard's just as mall construction commenced. The mall was initially popular and featured national chain stores. As the 1990s progressed, the mall faced challenges with the redevelopment of the former Westroads Shopping Center into the St. Louis Galleria. By the mid-1990s, Dillard's converted its location into one of its clearance stores, and no longer carried regular day-to-day merchandise, this location closed for good in 2001.[1][5] In recent years, the mall has undergone a series of financial troubles. In 2006, the almost-vacant "dead mall" closed,[6] and was bought by The Pyramid Companies and was planned to be turned into condominiums and retail space, though the plan was never realized,[3] as Pyramid closed in 2008 due to financial troubles.[7] The mall was foreclosed in 2009 by lender Bank of America and later bought for $12.7 million by Environmental Operations.[8] In 2009, the building was about 85% vacant, and other developers were trying to raise funding for a renovation of the mall.[9] Plans included a $35 million renovation, turning much of the complex into parking space,[3] as well as a $29 million project to attract tenants to the center's office tower.[9] The project, led by investor Stacy Hastie, includes plans for local law firm Lewis, Rice & Fingersh and accounting firm LarsonAllen LLP to move into the building. Earlier, the Missouri Development Finance Board had approved a $5 million loan for the project.[7] In May 2010, work began to convert part of the building into a 750-car parking garage and retail/entertainment complex called Mercantile Exchange.[4][10] The skybridges to the Famous-Barr Railway Exchange Building (St. Louis) and the former Stix, Baer and Fuller / Dillard's store (now referred to as The Laurel Building) have now been demolished to open up Washington and Locust streets.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "One City Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 9 February 2010. 
  2. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=fRhMAAAAIBAJ&sjid=qC4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=3749,3333531&dq=stix+baer+fuller+dillard's&hl=en
  3. ^ a b c d Brown, Lisa R. (25 October 2009). "St. Louis Centre: New parking, retail". St. Louis Business Journal. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 
  4. ^ a b AP (20 May 2010). "Party planned as downtown St. Louis skybridge falls to wrecking ball". Belleville News-Democrat. The McClatchy Company. Retrieved 27 May 2010. [dead link]
  5. ^ "One City Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 9 February 2010. 
  6. ^ Brown, Lisa R. (30 August 2006). "Steffen buys St. Louis Centre for $9.1M". St. Louis Business Journal. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  7. ^ a b Bryant, Tim (4 February 2010). "Foreclosure sale prods One City Centre renovation". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 16 February 2010. 
  8. ^ Hinderer, Katie. "Presbyterian Manors Secures $179M for Developmen". GlobeSt.com. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 
  9. ^ a b Logan, Tim. "State board gives first OK to $5M loan for One City Center". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 12 February 2010. 
  10. ^ Brown, Lisa R (16 May 2010). "Downtown St. Louis’ biggest eyesore to come down". St. Louis Business Journal (American City Business Journals, Inc). Retrieved 27 May 2010.