One Night at McCool's

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One Night at McCool's
One night at mccools.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Harald Zwart
Produced by Michael Douglas
Allison Lyon Segan
Written by Stan Seidel
Starring Liv Tyler
Matt Dillon
Paul Reiser
John Goodman
Michael Douglas
Andrew Silverstein
Music by Marc Shaiman
Cinematography Karl Walter Lindenlaub
Edited by Bruce Cannon
Production
company
October Films
As a Furthur Films
Distributed by USA Films
Release dates
  • April 27, 2001 (2001-04-27)
Running time
92 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Spanish
Budget $18 million[2]
Box office $13,473,370[2]

One Night at McCool's is a 2001 American crime comedy film written by Stan Seidel, directed by Harald Zwart, and starring Liv Tyler, Matt Dillon, Paul Reiser, John Goodman, Michael Douglas, and Andrew Silverstein.

Plot[edit]

The majority of the film consists of Randy, Carl, and Dehling reciting their separate lovesick accounts of their experiences with Jewel, each narrating over what they consider to be the real version of the recent events. Scenes are often re-enacted twice, with different accounts contradicting each other for comedic effect. For example, when Dehling is narrating, he acts as if he were a completely fair, by-the-book police officer, and Randy is painted as a slimy, macho, abusive thug. When Randy is telling the story, he is the innocent victim and Dehling is shown as a suspicious, prying, hard-nosed cop; Carl is convinced that every woman is in love with him, and during his version of the tale, everyone acts accordingly.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Writer Stan Seidel, who died prior to the film's release, drew much of the film's material from his days as a bartender at Humphrey's, a college bar located across the street from Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Reception[edit]

The film garnered mixed to poor reviews (Rotten Tomatoes rated it at 33%[3]), with Roger Ebert saying that the film "is so busy with its crosscut structure and its interlocking stories that it never really gives us anyone to identify with" but that "it has a lot of fun being a near miss."[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]