One Way Street

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For the traffic related article about one way streets, see one-way traffic. For the Soup Dragons song, see Hydrophonic (Soup Dragons album). For the Aerosmith song, see Aerosmith (album).
One Way Street
Onewaystreet.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Hugo Fregonese
Produced by Leonard Goldstein
Screenplay by Lawrence Kimble
Story by Lawrence Kimble
Starring James Mason
Märta Torén
Dan Duryea
Music by Frank Skinner
Cinematography Maury Gertsman
Edited by Milton Carruth
Production
company
Universal International Pictures
Distributed by Universal Studios
Release dates
  • April 21, 1950 (1950-04-21) (United States)
Running time 79 minutes
Country United States
Language English

One Way Street is a 1950 film noir directed by Hugo Fregonese featuring James Mason, Märta Torén and Dan Duryea. The crime film takes place mainly in Mexico.[1]

Plot[edit]

Dr. Frank Matson, a physician, steals $200,000 from mob boss John Wheeler henchmen after a robbery Wheeler and henchman Ollie have pulled off. Forced to go on the run, Matson also takes Wheeler's girlfriend Laura Thorsen with him.

After hiding out in Mexico, word gets back to Matson that Wheeler knows where he is. He and Laura go back to Los Angeles planning to return the money, only to find Wheeler has been shot by Ollie. About to meet the same fate, Matson produces a gun and kills Ollie instead.

Laura is waiting for him at a cafe. As they leave, Matson turns to go phone the airline to get away with Laura, but is hit by a car coming down the one-way street.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Film critic Bosley Crowther dismissed the film as uninteresting, "Perhaps it is all the fault of the script, which has our hero vacillating between a life of crime and regeneration via a lady's love and an honest but unremunerative practice. What it all adds up to is a standard romantic melodrama illustrating the facts that crime obviously doesn't pay and that the scenery and people below the border are colorful ... Like its title, One Way Street is explicitly obvious and not especially exciting."[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ One Way Street at the American Film Institute Catalog.
  2. ^ Crowther, Bosley. The New York Times film review, May 12, 1950. Accessed: August 16, 2013.

External links[edit]